Date   

Re: inexpensive pin vice/extra collets/cheap vs expensive wire drills

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <ed_mines@...> wrote :

"I bought an inexpensive pin vice off e bay and I can't get it to hold wire drills straight. Any comments?"


Comments? How about, you get what you pay for?

Otto Frei normally sells decent tools:

Vises: Bench, Hand, Pin Visest | OttoFrei.com

 


 





Re: Jack's RMC DiY Blast Booth

Douglas Harding
 

Bill, you can cut styrene, right? Cut rings the rings out of 40 thou and laminate together. He simple uses the plywood to hold the sleeves in place. Or search the local kitchen supply for large rubber rings used to seal jars. For an alternative to the sleeves what about a long pair of rubber gloves? Or how about a rubber seal at the arm holes and bare arms inside blaster. Certainly baking soda will not harm skin, and if careful you should be able to keep other blast medium off your skin.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

John
 

Tim,

The stuff I've used is Paasche AEX.  It's been a while since I bought any and at the time it was all that was available IIRC.  Now they call AEX fast cutting and they also have AE (medium cutting) and SSO (slow cutting). 
I poked around on their site and found the MSDS for these products.  AEX is aluminum oxide--no grit size given.  AE is pumice, and SSO is food starch.  Possibly one of these gentler compounds would be safe on painted items but I'd be cautious.

John Bopp



On Mar 13, 2015, at 2:25 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


What is the grit size for the Paasche aluminum oxide ? The label has no
size information. I've used the Badger grit and it seems more aggressive
than what I use in my booth which is 220 grit. I've tried to use baking
soda but it seemed much too soft, made a huge mess (in the garage), and
definitely is moisture absorbent.

Tim O'Connor



I've used an older Paasche LA-3 abrasive gun for some time.  The LAC-3 is the current version and has a carbide tip for better wear resistance.  I use it with Paasche compound for prepping brass for paint.  I used to use it only outdoors but now have a cabinet.  I found a cheap Harbor Freight blasting cabinet on closeout.  I threw out the HF gun and use the LA-3 in the cabinet.  I'm quite happy with it and Paasche products in general.
I've never used the LA-3 on plastic or any painted surfaces so can't say how it would work.  But I suspect it might be too aggressive and that the air eraser with a milder compound might be a better bet.

John Bopp
Farmington Hills, MI


On Mar 12, 2015, at 11:49 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have a small Badger Abrasion Gun that I use mainly for spraying Baking Soda to prep styrene and resin models before I paint. During my most recent etching ritual it became clogged and the usual cleaning steps did not clear it. I got frustrated and put it up and plan to completely disassemble it today to try to sort it out but I also went online today to see what is out there. TCP Global shows some Chinese Guns that I will look more closely at but I wanted to ask folks here if the have experience with either of these Passche Models:


Paasche Airbrush LAC#3 Abrasive Spray Gun


Re: Jack's RMC DiY Blast Booth

Bill Welch
 

For those interested in Jack's homebuild, my trip to Home Depot proved fruitless in finding a box similar to Jack's Sterilite example with the latches on each end to grasp the top so I continued down the road to Lowe's where I found an almost identical box made by Hefty; it is a 29 QT capacity measuring 16.7 inches by 12 inches and 13 inches deep or high. Price is $7.48. I also purchased an 8x10 inch piece of Lexan, screws, nuts and washers  and weather striping. I also bought a small 2.5 Gal. Shop Vac to collect the Baking Soda or to salvage more aggressive abrasives if I use them.

Jack used wood frames around the hand/arm opening to hold the elastic sleeves, but I am still cogitating on something similar that I can by as I do not have the tools to fabricate.  My next trip to hardware store I will look for something I can adapt. I am hoping I can find a Dry Cleaner nearby that offers Alterations so I can hire them to make the sleeves. With the Shop Vac I will need something to cover an air inlet so will look for that too. I also want to find a fitting of some kind to firmly surround the Air Eraser hose. suggestions gladly accepted.

For 1-to-1 scale work I don't consider myself particularly handy or crafty and my tools a very minimal, but I think if I can find fittings to adapt, I "will "git 'er done." LOL

This box provides plenty of room to manipulate a 50-foot boxcar model or an F-Unit or early Geep. It is clear so I don't think a light will be necessary.

Bill Welch


Re: URTX refrigerator cars leased to whom?

Douglas Harding
 

And don’t forget that Union Refrigeration was acquired by General American in 1929. Union Refrigeration continued to operate as a separate company, the URTX reporting marks lasted until long after this list. URTC and GATC were leasing companies, and leases had defined times. When a lease ended cars were returned, refurbished, most likely renumbered and repainted for a new lease. When a lease expired, a railroad or company would examine their needs, and if warranted sign a new lease for new cars.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


inexpensive pin vice/extra collets/cheap vs expensive wire drills

ed_mines
 

I bought an inexpensive pin vice off e bay and I can't get it to hold wire drills straight. Any comments?


Anyone know where I can get extra collets which hold the smaller sized wire drills?


Bought some US made , small wire drills off e bay ($6/doz) and they make cheaper, overseas made drills look like junk.


Ed Mines


Re: [resinfreightcars] multi-car loads by Richard Hendrickson

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Tony does the swivel pin in the 2-car pipe load fit very loosely? It seems to me that as long as there is a little "slack" in the fit then the slight change in center-to-center distance as it goes around a curve would not cause any problems -- On the other hand there must be a "minimum radius" for this arrangement yes?

Thanks for the article -- great open loads!


      You're welcome, Tim. The pin moves freely in the socket, but has little slack. I agree that SOME small slack poses no problem. My tightest radius anywhere on my layout is an industrial 22-inch, and I have a No. 4 switch in the same area -- this assembly runs through it fine. I also have a No. 6 crossover, through which it moves well too. I am sure there is a minimum radius, but don't know what it is. Obviously ONE issue is overhang on really sharp radii. I would not want to run this through tunnels over sharp curvature.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

Tim O'Connor
 


What is the grit size for the Paasche aluminum oxide ? The label has no
size information. I've used the Badger grit and it seems more aggressive
than what I use in my booth which is 220 grit. I've tried to use baking
soda but it seemed much too soft, made a huge mess (in the garage), and
definitely is moisture absorbent.

Tim O'Connor



I've used an older Paasche LA-3 abrasive gun for some time.  The LAC-3 is the current version and has a carbide tip for better wear resistance.  I use it with Paasche compound for prepping brass for paint.  I used to use it only outdoors but now have a cabinet.  I found a cheap Harbor Freight blasting cabinet on closeout.  I threw out the HF gun and use the LA-3 in the cabinet.  I'm quite happy with it and Paasche products in general.
I've never used the LA-3 on plastic or any painted surfaces so can't say how it would work.  But I suspect it might be too aggressive and that the air eraser with a milder compound might be a better bet.

John Bopp
Farmington Hills, MI


On Mar 12, 2015, at 11:49 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have a small Badger Abrasion Gun that I use mainly for spraying Baking Soda to prep styrene and resin models before I paint. During my most recent etching ritual it became clogged and the usual cleaning steps did not clear it. I got frustrated and put it up and plan to completely disassemble it today to try to sort it out but I also went online today to see what is out there. TCP Global shows some Chinese Guns that I will look more closely at but I wanted to ask folks here if the have experience with either of these Passche Models:


Paasche Airbrush LAC#3 Abrasive Spray Gun


Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

John
 

I've used an older Paasche LA-3 abrasive gun for some time.  The LAC-3 is the current version and has a carbide tip for better wear resistance.  I use it with Paasche compound for prepping brass for paint.  I used to use it only outdoors but now have a cabinet.  I found a cheap Harbor Freight blasting cabinet on closeout.  I threw out the HF gun and use the LA-3 in the cabinet.  I'm quite happy with it and Paasche products in general.
I've never used the LA-3 on plastic or any painted surfaces so can't say how it would work.  But I suspect it might be too aggressive and that the air eraser with a milder compound might be a better bet.

John Bopp
Farmington Hills, MI


On Mar 12, 2015, at 11:49 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have a small Badger Abrasion Gun that I use mainly for spraying Baking Soda to prep styrene and resin models before I paint. During my most recent etching ritual it became clogged and the usual cleaning steps did not clear it. I got frustrated and put it up and plan to completely disassemble it today to try to sort it out but I also went online today to see what is out there. TCP Global shows some Chinese Guns that I will look more closely at but I wanted to ask folks here if the have experience with either of these Passche Models:


Paasche Airbrush LAC#3 Abrasive Spray Gun

The above seems simpler than this model:

Paasche AECR Remote Air Eraser Etching Tool

The hose arrangement seems complex to me. Can anyone comment on the tip sizes and if they come in different sizes?


Not worried about cost exactly, and if the Chinese tools seem viable, I might go that way. Mainly concerned about support and parts and Passche has good rep for both.


Would love to know what others are using. Thanks!


Bill Welch


Re: Jack's RMC DiY Blast Booth [was: Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns]

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Thanks Richard...I didn't know that RMC was doing that.

Jack Burgess

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 13, 2015 10:09 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Jack's RMC DiY Blast Booth [was: Re: Air Erasers or
Abrasion Guns]

...which RMC has on-line at:
http://rrmodelcraftsman.com/extraboard/cm_extra_sandingbooth.php

I've already purchased the plastic storage box per instructions...

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 02:08 PM 3/12/2015, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC]
wrote:
I wrote an article which was in the Feb 2012 issue of RMC on building
your own blast booth using a plastic storage box. Let me know if any of
you want a copy.

Jack Burgess



------------------------------------
Posted by: Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Jack's RMC DiY Blast Booth [was: Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns]

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

...which RMC has on-line at:
http://rrmodelcraftsman.com/extraboard/cm_extra_sandingbooth.php

I've already purchased the plastic storage box per instructions...

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 02:08 PM 3/12/2015, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC] wrote:
I wrote an article which was in the Feb 2012 issue of RMC on building your own blast booth using a plastic storage box. Let me know if any of you want a copy.

Jack Burgess


Re: [EXTERNAL] multi-car loads by Richard Hendrickson (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Very nice! Thanks, Tony!

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 13, 2015 12:38 PM
To: STMFC; abrown@... [resinfreightcars]
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [STMFC] multi-car loads by Richard Hendrickson



I have written up and photographed some of the open-car loads built by Richard Hendrickson, involving multiple cars, and posted the descriptions to my blog. If you're interested, here is a link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/03/richard-hendricksons-multi-car-loads.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


multi-car loads by Richard Hendrickson

Tony Thompson
 

I have written up and photographed some of the open-car loads built by Richard Hendrickson, involving multiple cars, and posted the descriptions to my blog. If you're interested, here is a link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/03/richard-hendricksons-multi-car-loads.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: URTX refrigerator cars leased to whom?

sherman4863
 

Tom

  The info I have shows UTLX cars leased 1/1928-1/194?.  They leased GAXT cars starting 1/1946 so don't know if that is when the UTLX went back. Sam Sheerman


Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

mwbauers
 

A well fitting dust-filtering mask.

It can vary due to facial hair like beards........... But in general you are just filtering out dust when you blast or air-erase. A heavy blasting needs a more robust mask. A  comparatively light air-erasing or hobby-level paint removal blasting needs a decent dust mask that can be as simple as a name-brand painters disposable dust mask. Follow the directions about fitting the mask to your face and checking the fit, then start the job.

At work, with general grinding or closed booth vapor-bead blasting making a dust, the standard 3M paper dust mask works well. [worn under a face shield for grinding]............ remember to goggle your eyes as well while blasting. If there's dust in the air, it also gets into your eyes.

It changes to a better chemical-filtering mask if you are dealing with any fumes. But blasting is just making dust. The full time pros doing it all day use heavy-duty non-disposable commercial replacement filter masks, you won't need that for just the occasional hobby chore.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 13, 2015, at 10:53 AM, john.allyn wrote:


What kind of mask do you recommend/use?  

John Allyn


From: "Mike Bauers 

 

WEAR A MASK !!!


You will otherwise be inhaling fragments of decals, paint, and sometimes rust. A safer blast medium is not your only concern.


Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

john.allyn@...
 

What kind of mask do you recommend/use? 

John Allyn


From: "Mike Bauers mwbauers55@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, March 13, 2015 12:02:49 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

 

WEAR A MASK !!!


You will otherwise be inhaling fragments of decals, paint, and sometimes rust. A safer blast medium is not your only concern.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 12, 2015, at 8:22 PM, David bott wrote:

I used the wrong term in biodegradable. Small amounts of sodium bicarbonate can be absorbed in the lung mucus and then excreted, whereas aluminum oxide would not and would create longer lasting and more deleterious effects in the lungs as the body tried to get rid of it. Size always matters and I typically wear a filter mask and would never recommend inhaling large clouds of any particulate, but in the trace amounts you might inhale even with precautions biochemistry matters too. I'd rather inhale a small amount of sodium bicarbonate than aluminum oxide. Your preferences may vary.

Despite the numbers on the MOHs scale, sodium bicarbonate has been effective for me in removing decals and paint from styrene and brass on my models. .................




Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

Misc Clark
 

Jack - your blast booth from a storage box sounds interesting...may I get a copy of the article you wrote about it?
Thanks,
Clark Cone

On Thu, Mar 12, 2015 at 5:08 PM, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I wrote an article which was in the Feb 2012 issue of RMC on building your own blast booth using a plastic storage box. Let me know if any of you want a copy.

Jack Burgess

jack@...

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2015 1:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

The Badger is mostly plastic but maybe i will see something when I get it apart. The AO is abrasive enough to make the gun self-cleaning I suppose.

Bill Welch

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

mwbauers
 

WEAR A MASK !!!

You will otherwise be inhaling fragments of decals, paint, and sometimes rust. A safer blast medium is not your only concern.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 12, 2015, at 8:22 PM, David bott wrote:

I used the wrong term in biodegradable. Small amounts of sodium bicarbonate can be absorbed in the lung mucus and then excreted, whereas aluminum oxide would not and would create longer lasting and more deleterious effects in the lungs as the body tried to get rid of it. Size always matters and I typically wear a filter mask and would never recommend inhaling large clouds of any particulate, but in the trace amounts you might inhale even with precautions biochemistry matters too. I'd rather inhale a small amount of sodium bicarbonate than aluminum oxide. Your preferences may vary.

Despite the numbers on the MOHs scale, sodium bicarbonate has been effective for me in removing decals and paint from styrene and brass on my models. .................


URTX refrigerator cars leased to whom?

Thomas Baker
 

​Whether the Hopkins photos are still available I do not know, but a few years ago, I selected some that piqued my curiosity.  Among them was a photo showing a URTX refrigerator car leased to the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern Railway.  The photo was in black and white, so I cannot determine whether the MN&S emblem was red/white on the car or black/white.  Regardless of color or lack thereof, such a car would make an interesting model on my model railroad.  Does anyone know how long the MN&S leased refrigerator cars from URTX?  


Tom Baker


Re: Air Erasers or Abrasion Guns

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I used the wrong term in biodegradable. Small amounts of sodium bicarbonate can be absorbed in the lung mucus and then excreted, whereas aluminum oxide would not and would create longer lasting and more deleterious effects in the lungs as the body tried to get rid of it. Size always matters and I typically wear a filter mask and would never recommend inhaling large clouds of any particulate, but in the trace amounts you might inhale even with precautions biochemistry matters too. I'd rather inhale a small amount of sodium bicarbonate than aluminum oxide. Your preferences may vary.

Despite the numbers on the MOHs scale, sodium bicarbonate has been effective for me in removing decals and paint from styrene and brass on my models. I probably should etch for better adhesion, but I haven't.

And despite being on the east coast, I have not had much clogging. FYI, I use a Paasche air eraser, but really infrequently. If I buy aluminum oxide and a booth, they take up storage space. On the infrequent occasion I need to remove paint or decals, I can go into my wife's box, which she keeps for removing minor sink clogs or odors in trash cans. So it's a multi-task material, easily available and with less opportunity costs than Al oxide abrasive. Others will have far higher volumes and a dedicated cabinet and a recycled abrasive material would make far greater sense.

Most paint removal for me is on a loco, and decal removal even on freight cars is rare. I tend to need resin kits or kit bashing for my freight cars, so relative to this list topic, I find an air eraser and bicarb out on my picnic table with a mask is sufficient.

Your mileage WILL vary.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Mar 12, 2015, at 7:39 PM, Dave Parker spottab@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

4. Sodium bicarbonate is inorganic, so it cannot be "biodegradable". It is water-soluble (unlike Al oxide), but inhalation hazards are first and foremost a function of particle size, not chemical composition. The smaller the particle, the worse it is for your health.

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