Date   
Re: B&O 175975 box car

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Group!

The B&O Summary of Equipment of January 1, 1940 shows cars 175000-175999 as M-15D 40'-8" IL boxcars built in 1923.  Further Summaries show 390 in 1950 and rapidly diminishing numbers thereafter.  Check the Westerfield M-15 offerings for possible application.  Car in question was built by the Baltimore site of SSC.

I am not sure what the other questions are after.   Regards--Mike Schleigh



On Saturday, March 21, 2015 10:34 AM, "water.kresse@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I have a picture of a freshly repainted B&O box car No. 175975 at East Lexington yard.  It has a steel end with three vertical stamped-steel braces and wooden sides and doors.  The two box cars behind it are steel.  It has Roman stenciling and the round monogram with a dome in the middle.  Most of the images I have here are WW1 plus.  The sister C&O combine and passenger car train consist image has pre-1932 wooden cars.
Was there a mass shopping of these cars after WW1? . . . or WW2?
 
Al Kresse


Re: B&O 175975 box car

al.kresse
 

I have a picture of a freshly repainted B&O box car No. 175975 at East Lexington yard.  It has a steel end with three vertical stamped-steel braces and wooden sides and doors.  The two box cars behind it are steel.  It has Roman stenciling and the round monogram with a dome in the middle.  Most of the images I have here are WW1 plus.  The sister C&O combine and passenger car train consist image has pre-1932 wooden cars.
Was there a mass shopping of these cars after WW1? . . . or WW2?
 
Al Kresse

Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Armand Premo
 

Pierre,There are those who just like to build whether plastic OR resin. Armand P{remo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2015 7:53 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

 

A narrow niche of lunatics! :-)
And I include myself in that niche.

In truth resin kits are popular only in certain circles. And the numbers show that. I'm happy to sell 100-150 of any particular kit I release. Injection molded kits need at least 10 times that volume, if not more.
My observations would suggest that the percentage of modelers who buy resin is similar to the percentage of modelers who self-describe as "prototype modelers".

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/21/2015 7:45 AM, 'Armand' armprem2@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

    How do you account for the popularity of resin kits? Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 4:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

 


I had a conversation with Dick at the NMRA convention in Valley Forge and
also got the same impression of "tunnel vision" ... and without a doubt his
kits had problems. But then Branchline and Proto2000, who produced some of
the finest kits available, also folded up and sold out. So I think at least
part of the problem was there was already a huge shift underway to RTR by
the late 1980's. A one-man shop or any very small business without Chinese
manufacturing partners is fighting a strong head wind in this hobby, especially
with the decline in local hobby shops to stock kits for the "browsers".

Tim O'Connor

>I rarely comment on other people's business; today I'll make an exception. Dick fell into the trap that many smaller manufacturers do... they become "married" to one tool shop and refuse to see the limitations of that shop. Eastern Car Works is another example. Dick relied on the same toolmaker from the beginning to the end of his business... If Lloyd said it couldn't be done, by golly, it couldn't, don't bother me with the pesky detail that others are obviously doing it.
>
>I had an interesting conversation with both Dick and Lloyd back in the nineties when Accurate Finishing was looking to get into developing our own tooling; learned a lot, also saw the limitations. Why Dick never could is beyond me.
>
>Dennis Storzek

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4257/9347 - Release Date: 03/20/15

Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Pierre Oliver
 

A narrow niche of lunatics! :-)
And I include myself in that niche.

In truth resin kits are popular only in certain circles. And the numbers show that. I'm happy to sell 100-150 of any particular kit I release. Injection molded kits need at least 10 times that volume, if not more.
My observations would suggest that the percentage of modelers who buy resin is similar to the percentage of modelers who self-describe as "prototype modelers".
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/21/2015 7:45 AM, 'Armand' armprem2@... [STMFC] wrote:

�

��� How do you account for the popularity of resin kits? Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 4:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

�


I had a conversation with Dick at the NMRA convention in Valley Forge and
also got the same impression of "tunnel vision" ... and without a doubt his
kits had problems. But then Branchline and Proto2000, who produced some of
the finest kits available, also folded up and sold out. So I think at least
part of the problem was there was already a huge shift underway to RTR by
the late 1980's. A one-man shop or any very small business without Chinese
manufacturing partners is fighting a strong head wind in this hobby, especially
with the decline in local hobby shops to stock kits for the "browsers".

Tim O'Connor

>I rarely comment on other people's business; today I'll make an exception. Dick fell into the trap that many smaller manufacturers do... they become "married" to one tool shop and refuse to see the limitations of that shop. Eastern Car Works is another example. Dick relied on the same toolmaker from the beginning to the end of his business... If Lloyd said it couldn't be done, by golly, it couldn't, don't bother me with the pesky detail that others are obviously doing it.
>
>I had an interesting conversation with both Dick and Lloyd back in the nineties when Accurate Finishing was looking to get into developing our own tooling; learned a lot, also saw the limitations. Why Dick never could is beyond me.
>
>Dennis Storzek

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4257/9343 - Release Date: 03/20/15


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Armand Premo
 

    How do you account for the popularity of resin kits? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 4:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

 


I had a conversation with Dick at the NMRA convention in Valley Forge and
also got the same impression of "tunnel vision" ... and without a doubt his
kits had problems. But then Branchline and Proto2000, who produced some of
the finest kits available, also folded up and sold out. So I think at least
part of the problem was there was already a huge shift underway to RTR by
the late 1980's. A one-man shop or any very small business without Chinese
manufacturing partners is fighting a strong head wind in this hobby, especially
with the decline in local hobby shops to stock kits for the "browsers".

Tim O'Connor

>I rarely comment on other people's business; today I'll make an exception. Dick fell into the trap that many smaller manufacturers do... they become "married" to one tool shop and refuse to see the limitations of that shop. Eastern Car Works is another example. Dick relied on the same toolmaker from the beginning to the end of his business... If Lloyd said it couldn't be done, by golly, it couldn't, don't bother me with the pesky detail that others are obviously doing it.
>
>I had an interesting conversation with both Dick and Lloyd back in the nineties when Accurate Finishing was looking to get into developing our own tooling; learned a lot, also saw the limitations. Why Dick never could is beyond me.
>
>Dennis Storzek

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4257/9343 - Release Date: 03/20/15

Re: reviews or comparison of HO 33" and 36" wheels

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Thanks Dennis, that sounds like it is about the closest.  I'd forgotten S scale options.


Regards,


Ben Scanlon

Fw: Tahoe Model Works' 15 trucks

Andy Carlson <midcenturyandy@...>
 


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@...>
Date: Fri, Mar 20, 2015 at 7:21 PM
Subject: Fw: Tahoe Model Works' 15 trucks
To: Andy Carlson <midcenturyandy@...>



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@...>
To: Steam Era <stmfc@...>
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 8:42 AM
Subject: Tahoe Model Works' 15 trucks

Hello-

I am opening the doors to selling Brian Leppert's whole line of Tahoe Model Works HO trucks, which now are up to 15 unique trucks. Jim Hayes' web site for Sunshine models has prototype data and close-up pictures for all 15 trucks. Google "Sunshine Models" and click on "Links", scroll down to "Tahoe Model Works" and click.

I am offering all 15 different trucks as wheel-less truck pairs. Prices are $4.50/pair.

001   Dalman 2-level w/o lateral motion device
002   Dalman 2-level with lateral motion device
003   Arch Bar ASF 5'6" w.b.
004   Bettendorf Swing Motion Caboose truck
005   Barber-Bettendorf Swing Motion Caboose truck
006   Buckeye 50-ton w/ spring plank
007   Double truss self-aligning 50-ton
008   Coil-Eliiptic spring pack 50-ton
009   Barber Lateral motion 50-ton
010   ASF Ride-control A-3 70-ton
011   Old-time Arch Bar 5'0" w.b.
012   USRA Andrews
013   Barber S-2 w/ spring plank
014   Scullin 40-ton ARA w/ lateral motion
015   Scullin 40-ton ARA w/o lateral motion

Also, all of the trucks are available as the complete factory packaged line with code 88 semi-scale wheelsets. These are priced at $7.25/pair.  The part numbers for these is the above numbering, by substituting the 1st zero with a "2", e.g. A double truss # 007 becomes # 207 for the semi-scale equipped truck.

By special order, I can supply the above 15 trucks with code 110 "fat wheels" for the same 47.25/pair price. The example of the # 007, replace the 1st 0 with a "1", #107 is the double truss truck with fat wheels.

Shipping of $3.85 is applied to all orders. To contact me off-list (Please), use my email  <midcentury@...>
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Bill Welch
 

I really appreciate and enjoy knowing this part of the history of prototype modeling in 1/87th.

Bill Welch

Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal (UNCLASSIFIED)

spsalso
 

"How could anything in N scale be 'the next big thing"

That wasn't the thought in my mind a very long time ago when I saw a very attractive woman claiming her prize for her N scale contest submission.


Ed

Edward Sutorik

Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal (UNCLASSIFIED)

Alexander Schneider Jr
 

How could anything in N scale be 'the next big thing" :)

Alex Schneider



On Friday, March 20, 2015 3:15 PM, "'Gatwood, Elden SAW' elden.j.gatwood@... [STMFC]"



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Brian;

That is a story so strange it could only come from the model railroading world.  People think I'm nuts when I describe some of these events!

BTW, did women in N-scale ever turn into the next big thing?  I am really out of touch...

Elden Gatwood


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 2:38 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

 

Page Porter became head of the Art Department after Model Die Casting moved to Carson City, NV.  Page had Clarence Menteer's ear and had proposed the WP autocar project to him.  John Ryczkowski was probably the real impetus behind the project and provided the general arrangement drawing, without which we couldn't have done the tooling.  Richard Hendrickson also provided photos and diagrams.

Monju Menteer, Clarence's step daughter, pretty much had the say on what new cars we would do.  She felt that the future of the hobby was women in N scale and prototype didn't sell.  The last was, I think, a result of conversations with Richard Schweiger of C&BT Shops.  After Page's departure, Monju had her way.

As for my input, they had offered me the chance to buy one of those vacuum-formed plastic 4X8 layouts at dealer discount, which I declined.  Every real model railroader wants a layout, right?  But my in terest then was Southern Pacific over Donner in 1949 and cab forwards on that layout wouldn't have worked.  So Monju and her new art director decided I was just a brass collector and railroad historian and knew nothing of the hobby and thus my opinion was worthless (despite that I've been reading model railroading magazines since 1963).

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV
MDC moldmaker for 18 years 



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Gatwood, Elden SAW" <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
------------------------------------


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Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Tim O'Connor
 

I had a conversation with Dick at the NMRA convention in Valley Forge and
also got the same impression of "tunnel vision" ... and without a doubt his
kits had problems. But then Branchline and Proto2000, who produced some of
the finest kits available, also folded up and sold out. So I think at least
part of the problem was there was already a huge shift underway to RTR by
the late 1980's. A one-man shop or any very small business without Chinese
manufacturing partners is fighting a strong head wind in this hobby, especially
with the decline in local hobby shops to stock kits for the "browsers".

Tim O'Connor

I rarely comment on other people's business; today I'll make an exception. Dick fell into the trap that many smaller manufacturers do... they become "married" to one tool shop and refuse to see the limitations of that shop. Eastern Car Works is another example. Dick relied on the same toolmaker from the beginning to the end of his business... If Lloyd said it couldn't be done, by golly, it couldn't, don't bother me with the pesky detail that others are obviously doing it.

I had an interesting conversation with both Dick and Lloyd back in the nineties when Accurate Finishing was looking to get into developing our own tooling; learned a lot, also saw the limitations. Why Dick never could is beyond me.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

 

I rarely comment on other people's business; today I'll make an exception. Dick fell into the trap that many smaller manufacturers do... they become "married" to one tool shop and refuse to see the limitations of that shop. Eastern Car Works is another example. Dick relied on the same toolmaker from the beginning to the end of his business... If Lloyd said it couldn't be done, by golly, it couldn't, don't bother me with the pesky detail that others are obviously doing it.

I had an interesting conversation with both Dick and Lloyd back in the nineties when Accurate Finishing was looking to get into developing our own tooling; learned a lot, also saw the limitations. Why Dick never could is beyond me.

   I greatly appreciate these insights into both MDC, from Brian Leppert, and into what Dennis knows about C&BT Shops. But as someone who knew Dick Schweiger well (when I lived in PIttsburgh), I can tell you that Dick was endlessly frustrated with Lloyd's inability to produce molds for more refined parts. Dick does seem to have talked himself into believing it was "good enough," but let's not think for a minute he didn't know better. He was a skilled modeler himself and certainly was very well aware of how details OUGHT to look. What I never understood was Dick's failure to find another toolmaker.
     Then he fell into the belief that molded-on details would result in FAR more sales. On this list, we don't need to discuss the pros and cons of that one.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <b.hom@...> wrote :

"Dick deserves much credit for both introducing the postwar AAR boxcar models and coming up with the blueprint for the next generation of freight car models to come (multiple detail variations, separate detail parts). Unfortunately, it appears he drew the wrong conclusions from his sales. Prototype does sell; poorly executed prototype models don't."


I rarely comment on other people's business; today I'll make an exception. Dick fell into the trap that many smaller manufacturers do... they become "married" to one tool shop and refuse to see the limitations of that shop. Eastern Car Works is another example. Dick relied on the same toolmaker from the beginning to the end of his business... If Lloyd said it couldn't be done, by golly, it couldn't, don't bother me with the pesky detail that others are obviously doing it.

I had an interesting conversation with both Dick and Lloyd back in the nineties when Accurate Finishing was looking to get into developing our own tooling; learned a lot, also saw the limitations. Why Dick never could is beyond me.

Dennis Storzek

Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Brian;

That is a story so strange it could only come from the model railroading world. People think I'm nuts when I describe some of these events!

BTW, did women in N-scale ever turn into the next big thing? I am really out of touch...

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 2:38 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal



Page Porter became head of the Art Department after Model Die Casting moved to Carson City, NV. Page had Clarence Menteer's ear and had proposed the WP autocar project to him. John Ryczkowski was probably the real impetus behind the project and provided the general arrangement drawing, without which we couldn't have done the tooling. Richard Hendrickson also provided photos and diagrams.

Monju Menteer, Clarence's step daughter, pretty much had the say on what new cars we would do. She felt that the future of the hobby was women in N scale and prototype didn't sell. The last was, I think, a result of conversations with Richard Schweiger of C&BT Shops. After Page's departure, Monju had her way.

As for my input, they had offered me the chance to buy one of those vacuum-formed plastic 4X8 layouts at dealer discount, which I declined. Every real model railroader wants a layout, right? But my in terest then was Southern Pacific over Donner in 1949 and cab forwards on that layout wouldn't have worked. So Monju and her new art director decided I was just a brass collector and railroad historian and knew nothing of the hobby and thus my opinion was worthless (despite that I've been reading model railroading magazines since 1963).

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV
MDC moldmaker for 18 years



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Benjamin Hom
 

Brian Leppert wrote:
"Monju Menteer, Clarence's step daughter, pretty much had the say on what new cars we would do. She felt that the future of the hobby was women in N scale and prototype didn't sell. The last was, I think, a result of conversations with Richard Schweiger of C&BT Shops. After Page's departure, Monju had her way."
Dick deserves much credit for both introducing the postwar AAR boxcar models and coming up with the blueprint for the next generation of freight car models to come (multiple detail variations, separate detail parts). Unfortunately, it appears he drew the wrong conclusions from his sales. Prototype does sell; poorly executed prototype models don't.


Ben Hom

Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

brianleppert@att.net
 

Page Porter became head of the Art Department after Model Die Casting moved to Carson City, NV.  Page had Clarence Menteer's ear and had proposed the WP autocar project to him.  John Ryczkowski was probably the real impetus behind the project and provided the general arrangement drawing, without which we couldn't have done the tooling.   Richard Hendrickson also provided photos and diagrams.

Monju Menteer, Clarence's step daughter, pretty much had the say on what new cars we would do.  She felt that the future of the hobby was women in N scale and prototype didn't sell.  The last was, I think, a result of conversations with Richard Schweiger of C&BT Shops.  After Page's departure, Monju had her way.

As for my input, they had offered me the chance to buy one of those vacuum-formed plastic 4X8 layouts at dealer discount, which I declined.  Every real model railroader wants a layout, right?  But my interest then was Southern Pacific over Donner in 1949 and cab forwards on that layout wouldn't have worked.  So Monju and her new art director decided I was just a brass collector and railroad historian and knew nothing of the hobby and thus my opinion was worthless (despite that I've been reading model railroading magazines since 1963).

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV
MDC moldmaker for 18 years  

Car # for Milw Composite Gondola

Gary Wildung
 

I have a Milw Composite Gondola Kit made by Westerfield  in 303000 to 310624 series  . Looking for the numbers in 1953 when there are six left they also had 11 left in 1952 equipment register . I known 306811 was the only one left in 1/56 from the information  from Westerfield  Would like to use one  the other  numbers. Thanks for any help on this.
Gary

new book

Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC,
Per Eric Neubauer's request, I'm forwarding a short message about his new book.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

Begin forwarded message:

Cast Steel Underframe Railcar Production is done and available as a free download. Check out the Eric's Car of the Month page at ericsrailroadcarhistory.com .
Enjoy,
Eric

Re: reviews or comparison of HO 33" and 36" wheels

Dennis Storzek
 

Ben,

You need to think outside the box... or scale, as the case may be. Northwest Short Line, long a supplier of after market wheels and gears here in the US, has Code 88 profile Sn3 26" wheels. 26" in S scale, 1:64, is .406" - Close enough? Of course, Sn3 is only .563" gauge, but you were going to re-gauge these anyway, right?

Actually, you should contact NWSL; they used to do custom wheelsets, any stock wheel on any stock axle, for not much over the price of standard sets. The also used to be able to supply custom length axles. I haven't dealt with them since the ownership changed, but I imagine they still do. If you talk with them, please report back.

Here is their web page:
Home Page

 


And the specific wheel page:
http://www.nwsl.com/uploads/chap3_web_02-15.pdf


Dennis Storzek

Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

O Fenton Wells
 

As usual Bill you have inspired me to try to build one or two of these.  So the $64 question is will Athearn re release these cars. According to their web site yesterday they are discontinued.  Anyone have any thoughts?

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...