Date   

Re: Hobby Shops in the Nashville, TN area

bilbrey98@...
 

To echo what Mr. Mercante wrote, there really isn't "must visit" model railroad friendly hobby shops in the Nashville, TN area besides the one at the Tennessee Central Railway Museum.  The museum's hobby shop is small and tend to focus on the "southeastern" prototypes (catering mostly to HO and N).  There is a HobbyTown USA in Mt. Juliet (just east of Nashville) that has a small selection of model railroading equipment and books/magazines.  And, there is another hobbyshop around a hour's drive southeast of Nashville (the Dixie Flyer in Wartrace) that caters to model railroaders.  That store is located adjacent to the CSX mainline  (ex-NC&StL) that runs between Nashville and Chattanooga.

 

If you are visiting during the month of April, there are train shows on three of the Saturdays (April 11th @ the TCRM, a TCA "mini-meet" on April 18th, and April 25th in Wartrace).

 

James Bilbrey

LaVergne, TN


Mining traffic on LA&SL

Don Strack
 

I've been doing some newspaper research about the Pioche mining district in southern Nevada, which was connected to the rest of the world by LA&SL's 32-mile Pioche Branch from Caliente. From Caliente, LA&SL moved the mined ore north about 340 miles to the smelters near Salt Lake City, all of which were served directly by LA&SL. I am looking to see if the steel cars of the narrow gauge Eureka Hill Ry. were sold to the Pioche Pacific. But that's another story.


At its height in the mid 1920s, the entire Pioche district shipped about 1,800 to 2,000 tons per week, all over the LA&SL Pioche Branch. If my calculations are right, at about 40 tons per car, this makes about 45-50 cars per week, or about 9 cars per work day. Here is a specific week in April 1923: During the third week of April 1923, the Pioche district shipped 1,940 tons: Virginia Louise, 560 tons; Prince company, Bullionville tailings, 630 tons; Prince company, Dry Valley tailings, 355 tons; Bristol Silver Mines (Synder interests), 245 tons; Combined Metals mine (Synder interests), 150 tons. (Salt Lake Telegram, April 21, 1923)


This ore was mostly copper and iron, with nice percentages of silver and gold to make the trip worthwhile. The iron ore was needed by the big Salt Lake smelters as what was known as flux ore, to balance out the high sulphide copper ore being processed from the Bingham mines.


My point with this message is to ask if my 40-ton estimate is correct, and maybe what type of car. I do have a list of LA&SL gondolas from 1925, numbered in the 200000 series, with a stated capacity of 50 tons, but I don't think they actually were loaded to their limit due to bad track on the spurs at the mines.


Don Strack


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Bill Welch
 

Dear Ben,

The B50-15 is Sunshine #38.9 and the B50-13 is their #17.3. Sorry for the omission.

Bill Welch


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

benjamin
 

Bill:

I just received my copy of Ted's PRM Vol. 3.  I really enjoyed both of the articles that you authored and have not read Bob Chapman's article yet  I have one question for you.  What kit did you start with to model the TN&O boxcar?  I could not find that information when I read the article.

Thanks,
Ben Heinley
Denver


Re: Stripes and ampersand on T&NO (SP) freight cars

david ellzey
 

Looks like I have plenty lines to "erase". These are Red Caboose RTR cars that are lettered "as built", they may need to be renumbered too.

Thanks, David
 


From: "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2015 8:00 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Stripes and ampersand on T&NO (SP) freight cars

 

The thin white lines above & below reporting marks ended about 1948, if I
recall correctly. I have many photos of SP freight cars in this era and very
few of the cars still have the lines. Some still did, but it was uncommon by
1960 and later.

Tim O'Connor

>Modeling the late 50's and early 60's, would the stripes above and below the reporting marks have been removed during renumbering. Is it possible that a few stripes survived into the 60's? Same with the ampersand on T&NO cars, could any have survived?
>
>Thanks in advance.
>
>David Ellzey




ADMIN: Termination of the "Random Thought" thread

Mikebrock
 

Well, perhaps at some point this thread [ Random thoughts...] did have some discussion about steam era freight cars and while a few times it wandered into areas definitely out of scope [ business practices of manufacturers ], it did serve, I suppose, to allow those who fear the impending doom of the worl...uh...hobby to announce why they believe model trains are fast disappearing so maybe we won't have to endure that again for awhile. I actually would have terminated this thread long ago except that I got involved with 4-12-2 studies again.

I will add one thing and try to keep some of our members from considering suicide by simply noting that the old song is right. "Nothing stays the same".

And now, the thread called "Random Thoughts from my two articles..." but which really is a thread about the health of the MR hobby is now terminated. I might note that the new wing to Moderate Jail is ready for admittance...although, as is our custom...while we supply clean plates and drinking glasses...there is no food or drink.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Hobby Shops in the Nashville, TN area

Mitchell Mercante
 

TJ,

The only model railroad friendly hobby shop in Nashville and its immediate surroundings is at the Tennessee Centrail Railway Museum in Nashville.  There is a smallish but well stocked store in the museum with nothing but railroad related products.

Regards,

Mitch Mercante



On Sunday, March 22, 2015 11:18 AM, "'T.J. Stratton' michigancentralrr@... [STMFC]" wrote:




Are there any "must visit" model railroad friendly hobby shops in the Nashville, TN area?

Thanks- TJ

TJ Stratton Maumee, OH. "Modeling the 1950's branch lines of the Michigan Central Railroad in southern Michigan" Mailto:michigancentralrr@...





Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitc...

mwbauers
 

In another Yahoo group, they are discussing ways to bring in new modelers.

They inspired me to come up with a display that starts from the basic level and ends with the completed models along with some one building and chatting with them.... With slideshows  and some other goodies.

It goes outside of any ingrained preference for RTR or kit and gives a bit of inspiration for trying a different approach.

I'm quite bummed at my favorite hobby shop closing, even to the point of not yet trying a recommended new place. Or maybe it's all of this blasted snow that kept me away since the end of December, when 'my' place closed?

I can at least feel I'm working on the promotion of the hobby this coming fall and now that the snow is nearly gone, I'll finally get to that highly recommended hobby shop.

While I've lamented losing that grand old hobby shop, I've felt good about planning out my next few projects involving just how to make the things, and have fun in the building process.

That last paragraph is just what I most enjoy about this hobby.

Mike Bauers


On Mar 22, 2015, at 11:24 AM, "tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

All five of my Grandson's have trains and I have made sure of that. Tim and I belong to  a Facebook group that would send the "old man's hobby" stats in the round file as we are definitely the minority if you are say old is 50+. 
 
I am sick of this hobby doom and is getting real old.
 
If you want a hobby shop support him.  Don't spend all your money on the Internet.
 
If you want to do the Internet thing, if a good shop on line...
 
If you like kits because you like to model don't buy ready to run.
 
If you don't want to buy Ready to Run vote with your dollars.
 
It is that simple... No more whining, please!
 
Can we move on now please?
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
In a message dated 3/21/2015 6:58:08 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
I have to agree somewhat that that it's an "old man's hobby". Back in the early 50's just about every kid had a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. Now, the kids want computer games and other hi-tech stuff. Changing times.
I remember steam on mainline railroads (yep, I'm a dinosaur), that's why most of us in our 60's and older model the transition era, we can relate. It was a very interesting era.
But this hobby is getting more hi-tech and sophisticated all the time, great to lure the younger generation in. I personally think it will be around a very long time.


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitc...

Greg Martin
 

All five of my Grandson's have trains and I have made sure of that. Tim and I belong to  a Facebook group that would send the "old man's hobby" stats in the round file as we are definitely the minority if you are say old is 50+. 
 
I am sick of this hobby doom and is getting real old.
 
If you want a hobby shop support him.  Don't spend all your money on the Internet.
 
If you want to do the Internet thing, if a good shop on line...
 
If you like kits because you like to model don't buy ready to run.
 
If you don't want to buy Ready to Run vote with your dollars.
 
It is that simple... No more whining, please!
 
Can we move on now please?
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 3/21/2015 6:58:08 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
I have to agree somewhat that that it's an "old man's hobby". Back in the early 50's just about every kid had a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. Now, the kids want computer games and other hi-tech stuff. Changing times.
I remember steam on mainline railroads (yep, I'm a dinosaur), that's why most of us in our 60's and older model the transition era, we can relate. It was a very interesting era.
But this hobby is getting more hi-tech and sophisticated all the time, great to lure the younger generation in. I personally think it will be around a very long time.


Re: If things are so bad why. . .

Jack Burgess
 

Tim wondered:

I watched a Netflix documentary today on 3-D printing, and I wondered -- Who
will produce the first 3-D copier? I mean, you just put the car (or 1:1
part) into the copier and out pops a perfect scale copy! :-) It's a whole
new world.

It is already being done Tim. A friend has a 3D scanner which will output
code to drive a CNC machine. Newer scanners will output a file which can be
3D printed. I doubt that the resolution is what we need but all of this
technology is changing fast. How about figures on your layout which
replicate yourself and friends:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2836838/worlds-first-3d-full-body-scann
ing-booth-to-create-custom-you-figurines.html


Jack Burgess


Re: If things are so bad why. . .

Jack Burgess
 

Tim wondered:

I watched a Netflix documentary today on 3-D printing, and I wondered -- Who
will produce the first 3-D copier? I mean, you just put the car (or 1:1
part) into the copier and out pops a perfect scale copy! :-) It's a whole
new world.

It is already being done Tim. A friend has a 3D scanner which will output
code to drive a CNC machine. Newer scanners will output a file which can be
3D printed. I doubt that the resolution is what we need but all of this
technology is changing fast. How about figures on your layout which
replicate yourself and friends:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2836838/worlds-first-3d-full-body-scann
ing-booth-to-create-custom-you-figurines.html


Re: Random Thoughts ...

MDelvec952@...
 



Looking for 500-sellers in the resin biz I would first check with Al Westerfield. That his kits were distributed by Walthers and were a stock item in the hobby shop heyday before the names like Sunshine and Funaro and Speedwich were common makes me think that many of his PRR and NYC offerings may have had a 500-piece stocking order at Walthers.

I am curious which of the injected steam-era freight cars may have sold a million units over its lifetime, as was suggested in a previous note in this thread.

             ....Mike Del Vecchio


-----Original Message-----
From: riverman_vt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Mar 22, 2015 12:43 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts ...

 
    Now you have me curious, Tim. It is possible that a resin car kit or two have 
sold 500 units but which do you think these might have been and what evidence 
of such  do we have?

Cordially, Don Valentine


Hobby Shops in the Nashville, TN area

T.J. Stratton
 

Are there any "must visit" model railroad friendly hobby shops in the Nashville, TN area?

Thanks- TJ

TJ Stratton Maumee, OH. "Modeling the 1950's branch lines of the Michigan Central Railroad in southern Michigan" Mailto:michigancentralrr@...


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

david ellzey
 

The tinplate train set was the humble beginning of this hobby. Am I correct on this assumption? I believe one reason kids wanted trains was the larger roles that railroads played in the communities at that time. Another reason is the fascination of seeing a miniature train snake through trackwork and realistic scenery, this certainly still holds true today! It offers something for just about every one with an interest in railroads or history.
David
 


From: "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2015 9:03 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

 
I have to agree somewhat that that it's an "old man's hobby". Back in the early 50's just about every kid had a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. Now, the kids want computer games and other hi-tech stuff. Changing times.

   But the trains under the Christmas tree that kids played with are NOT the hobby, not now and not then. Of course it may get kids intrigued, but the hobby we are talking about is, one might say, entirely different. Most people join it decades later than the Christmas tree experience.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history







Re: Random Thoughts ...

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

Oh wow, now we're looking for "evidence"....stick a fork in this thread, it's done. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


From:"riverman_vt@... [STMFC]"
Date:Sun, Mar 22, 2015 at 12:43 AM
Subject:[STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts ...

 

    Now you have me curious, Tim. It is possible that a resin car kit or two have 

sold 500 units but which do you think these might have been and what evidence 
of such do we have?

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: paper models (was Re: Random Thoughts ...)

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tim,

Clever Models has an HO or O-scale Clyde Puffer paper model: http://clevermodels.squarespace.com/models-gallery/ . Admittedly, this is a European design, but the superstructure could easily be reworked to something more American. This is a print-it-yourself kit.

Another print-it-yourself kit from Scalescenes makes several narrowboats in N or OO (which can be rescaled for HO): http://scalescenes.com/products/T018-Narrowboats-and-lock . These aren't quite as a adaptable to the US scene as the Puffer, but are interesting models.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



On 3/21/15 11:11 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Mike

There's some really cool stuff there -- I'm a real believer in paper for
building structures and I see from this web site there are SHIP MODELS too!
Paper is ideal IMO for a lot of applications like this for layouts because
it is cheap, light, and static -- i.e. it doesn't have to move around on
wheels or be handled. It's just there to serve as a backdrop for TRAINS. :-)

Tim O'Connor



 I was afraid I'd scare too many with that one. Its very complex.
 But it sure shows how complex curved surfaces can be done in materials one wouldn't expect to work.
 Best to ya,
 Mike Bauers
 Milwaukee, Wi

 There's a GG1` paper kit as well.
  http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/2027/gg1/index.html
 Scott Haycock



Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I've seen lots of youth railroad model videos on YouTube (even one weathering freight cars that fit this list) and someone contacted me from my rail history website asking for proto info to design freight cars virtually. Modeling with a computer takes different skills than modeling with resin, but no less interesting or rewarding.

Perhaps it may only be an old man's hobby if your looking for a kid like Opie Taylor or Dennis the Menace instead of Bart Simpson or Sheldon Cooper?

Could it be the hobby may be bigger and faster growing without you seeing it?

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Mar 21, 2015, at 9:58 PM, david ellzey davidellzey1@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have to agree somewhat that that it's an "old man's hobby". Back in the early 50's just about every kid had a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. Now, the kids want computer games and other hi-tech stuff. Changing times.
I remember steam on mainline railroads (yep, I'm a dinosaur), that's why most of us in our 60's and older model the transition era, we can relate. It was a very interesting era.
But this hobby is getting more hi-tech and sophisticated all the time, great to lure the younger generation in. I personally think it will be around a very long time.
 

From: "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2015 8:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

 

> Face it; it's an old man's hobby.
> Brad

Not old -- but most people get into the hobby (or come back to it, as I did)
in their 30's and 40's after they "settle down" and develop an interest in doing
some activity in their leisure time at home. But I think the median age of NMRA
membership was always in the low 40's... It's probably climbed now since a lot
of new model railroaders no longer join because there are so many other outlets
for sharing in the hobby. Like STMFC!

Ah well it's nothing to worry about -- considering everything that is out there,
there's never been a better time to enjoy this hobby than right now!

Tim O'Connor




Re: paper models (was Re: Random Thoughts ...)

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike

There's some really cool stuff there -- I'm a real believer in paper for
building structures and I see from this web site there are SHIP MODELS too!
Paper is ideal IMO for a lot of applications like this for layouts because
it is cheap, light, and static -- i.e. it doesn't have to move around on
wheels or be handled. It's just there to serve as a backdrop for TRAINS. :-)

Tim O'Connor



 I was afraid I'd scare too many with that one. Its very complex.
 But it sure shows how complex curved surfaces can be done in materials one wouldn't expect to work.
 Best to ya,
 Mike Bauers
 Milwaukee, Wi

 There's a GG1` paper kit as well.
  http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/2027/gg1/index.html
 Scott Haycock


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

Tim O'Connor
 

David

And people are living longer. And the world as a whole is becoming much
wealthier, with lots more leisure and hobby spending. These are macro trends,
as is the decline of unskilled or low-skill manufacturing jobs, automation,
etc. I read somewhere that 80% of the children born in the USA after 2000
will reach their 100th birthday! And railroads are enjoying a revival in
much of the world and have pretty much stopped contracting in North America.
So I think you are right, this is a great, fun hobby and will continue to be
as long as our civilization lasts. :-)

Tim O'Connor

I remember steam on mainline railroads (yep, I'm a dinosaur), that's why most of us in our 60's
and older model the transition era, we can relate. It was a very interesting era. But this hobby
is getting more hi-tech and sophisticated all the time, great to lure the younger generation in.
I personally think it will be around a very long time.


Re: Random Thoughts from my two articles in Volume 3 of Speedwitch's Modeling Journal

mwbauers
 

I was afraid I'd scare too many with that one. Its very complex.

But it sure shows how complex curved surfaces can be done in materials one wouldn't expect to work.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 21, 2015, at 9:53 PM, 'Scott H. Haycock '  wrote:


There's a GG1` paper kit as well.


Scott Haycock


 



Here..... try something different.... download and consider building this per the plans and study how you could make a more conventional RR model from it.....


Or some just as modern, but less complicated to build...

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