Date   

Re: Yarmouth stirrup steps

Robert J Miller CFA
 

I think the appropriate method may vary with the complexity of the task. E.G. photos might be adequate to explain how to drill ladder rails, while folding & twisting sill steps into shape might be better done with a short video. In any case, any tips you can illustrate, regardless of the medium use, would be most welcome.
 
Robert J. Miller CFA
Saginaw, MI

Tell the truth, work hard, and come to dinner on time.
Gerald R. Ford



From: "Pierre Oliver pierre.oliver@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2015 3:35 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Yarmouth stirrup steps

 
Hope it works for you Ed.
Now in that vein, what would you guys like to see for guides for some of these fiddly bits, like folding ladder stiles, and twisting the stirrups?
Some form of link to YouTube clips? Or would simple blogpsots with images suffice?
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


On 4/12/2015 2:53 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
thanks indeed!

ed mines




Re: Yarmouth stirrup steps

Robert J. Amsler, Jr.
 

Pierre:



I would prefer a video or photos because I believe it communicates best when coupled with a description. I know that at times I have had to read someone’s description more than a time or two to try and understand what the person is saying. Once I see the photo, then I understand what the person said and I wonder how I ever had trouble understanding what the person wrote.



Bob Amsler

Saint Louis, Missouri



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2015 2:35 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Yarmouth stirrup steps





Hope it works for you Ed.
Now in that vein, what would you guys like to see for guides for some of these fiddly bits, like folding ladder stiles, and twisting the stirrups?
Some form of link to YouTube clips? Or would simple blogpsots with images suffice?

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com <http://www.elgincarshops.com>
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com <http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com>

On 4/12/2015 2:53 PM, ed_mines@yahoo.com <mailto:ed_mines@yahoo.com> [STMFC] wrote:



thanks indeed!



ed mines


Re: Old Trains, New Parts?

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

The link is not working.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


Andy Harman wrote:
"This really started with the Ulrich GS gondola, which I think was a well detailed and good looking model in its day, and unlike its modern
superplastic or even brass counterparts, it actually had operating drop doors.

I really can't think of any instances in which I'd use this vintage stuff to make a state of the art prototypical model."
Actually, you just named one instance. The Ulrich GS gon is still the only game in town for SP Class G-50-12; the Red Caboose and Detail Associates models are not the same prototype. Here's one of Tony Thompson's models (scroll midway down page):
http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/04/choosing-model-car-fleet-8-gondloas.html

Ben Hom


Re: Old Trains, New Parts?

Tony Thompson
 

Ben Hom wrote:

Actually, you just named one instance. The Ulrich GS gon is still the only game in town for SP Class G-50-12; the Red Caboose and Detail Associates models are not the same prototype. Here's one of Tony Thompson's models (scroll midway down page):
http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/04/choosing-model-car-fleet-8-gondloas.html


    Ben's link unfortunately misspells "gondolas," so won't work. Here is the right link:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Old Trains, New Parts?

Benjamin Hom
 

Andy Harman wrote:
"This really started with the Ulrich GS gondola, which I think was a well detailed and good looking model in its day, and unlike its modern
superplastic or even brass counterparts, it actually had operating drop doors.

I really can't think of any instances in which I'd use this vintage stuff to make a state of the art prototypical model."
Actually, you just named one instance. The Ulrich GS gon is still the only game in town for SP Class G-50-12; the Red Caboose and Detail Associates models are not the same prototype. Here's one of Tony Thompson's models (scroll midway down page):
http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/04/choosing-model-car-fleet-8-gondloas.html


Ben Hom


Re: Old Trains, New Parts?

Andy Harman
 

I too have some stash of vintage HO freight cars from the 1950s and 60s, but my reason for having them is nostalgic rather than prototype modeling. As such I look for complete original cars in good condition, built or unbuilt. Athearn metal line, MDC when it really was "die cast", Revell, Varney, Hobbyline, Ulrich etc. I do occasionally set up some code 100 track and operate these cars behind a Mantua Pacific or other blacksmith-era power. One thing I have done is put Kadees on everything. I may be nostalgic but I'm not a masochist. I always despised horn hook and Mantua loop couplers, and that's one headache I don't need.

This really started with the Ulrich GS gondola, which I think was a well detailed and good looking model in its day, and unlike its modern superplastic or even brass counterparts, it actually had operating drop doors.

I really can't think of any instances in which I'd use this vintage stuff to make a state of the art prototypical model. Doesn't mean it can't be done, but that's not really what I'm wanting from them. They are what they are, and I consider the vintage stuff to be a separate hobby. I didn't cut my teeth on Lionel like so many of my generation and before, so I have no childhood memories there to try and reclaim - Lionel was something the other kids had. My childhood memories are of these old metal, metal and wood, and early plastic rolling stock.

Andy


Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs

Benjamin Hom
 

Clark Propst wrote:
"Frustrated with another project I decided to build my PMHS commissioned Red Caboose model. It’s been forever since I’ve built one of those X29 cars. I was very impressed with the engineering of the kit. Went together much better than most plastic kits and with better detailing. The PMHS had an amended instruction page added. I noticed from photos in RP Cyc 18 they missed the route card placard on the door and the pulling loops in the sill."

Careful - you have more issues than a missing route card placard and towing loops. Do not depend on the kit instructions regarding brake layout - ensure you verify the prototype brake layout (including the retainer line on the B end) and modify as necessary. The AB brake layout in the Red Caboose instructions is correct ONLY for PRR Dreadnaught end cars built new with AB brakes and is not correct for Class X29 boxcars retrofitted with AB brakes or any ARA-design cars built new. The transverse-mounted reservoir is a key spotting feature and is an obvious indicator that you got it wrong on the model, so a little care here is in order.


Ben Hom


Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs

Clark Propst
 

Frustrated with another project I decided to build my PMHS commissioned Red Caboose model. It’s been forever since I’ve built one of those X29 cars. I was very impressed with the engineering of the kit. Went together much better than most plastic kits and with better detailjk.
The PMHS had an amended instruction page added. I noticed from photos in RP Cyc 18 they missed the route card placard on the door and the pulling loops in the sill.
I haven’t glued the Accurail Hutchins roof on yet. I’m waiting to stop at a hobby shop in St Paul this weekend to pick up more Kadee running boards. I’ll paint them together before installing.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Search Function

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

I asked a question, no need to get all emotional over it

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


From:"'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]"
Date:Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 11:58 AM
Subject:Re: [STMFC] Search Function

 

WHAT?  NO!  This car has nothing to do with Branchline.  Where did you get that idea??  This is a car that was tooled by Atlas a few years back and does not even vaguely resemble the Branchline steel cars (other than it being about 40’ in length and steel construction).  And yes, Branchline fixed the error on their car almost immediately.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Apr 14, 2015, at 10:48 AM, Mark Drake markstation01@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



This was the old Branchline car, right? And if so it was never made accurately was it?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


From:"Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date:Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 11:37 AM
Subject:Re: [STMFC] Search Function

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"I entered Atlas USRA Rebuilds and received lots of hits from July and August 2013 discussions as well as discussions from the original, early 2011 model release."

Do a search on "S Helper Service USRA Rebuild" and you'll turn up older posts when this model first hit the shelves. We'd like to think that the bad old days when manufacturer research consisted of copying Athearn's models, but unfortunately, this abomination shows that the practice is alive and well.

Ben Hom





Re: Search Function

Bruce Smith
 

WHAT?  NO!  This car has nothing to do with Branchline.  Where did you get that idea??  This is a car that was tooled by Atlas a few years back and does not even vaguely resemble the Branchline steel cars (other than it being about 40’ in length and steel construction).  And yes, Branchline fixed the error on their car almost immediately.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Apr 14, 2015, at 10:48 AM, Mark Drake markstation01@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



This was the old Branchline car, right? And if so it was never made accurately was it?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


From:"Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date:Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 11:37 AM
Subject:Re: [STMFC] Search Function

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"I entered Atlas USRA Rebuilds and received lots of hits from July and August 2013 discussions as well as discussions from the original, early 2011 model release."

Do a search on "S Helper Service USRA Rebuild" and you'll turn up older posts when this model first hit the shelves. We'd like to think that the bad old days when manufacturer research consisted of copying Athearn's models, but unfortunately, this abomination shows that the practice is alive and well.

Ben Hom





Re: Search Function

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

This was the old Branchline car, right? And if so it was never made accurately was it?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


From:"Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]"
Date:Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 11:37 AM
Subject:Re: [STMFC] Search Function

 

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"I entered Atlas USRA Rebuilds and received lots of hits from July and August 2013 discussions as well as discussions from the original, early 2011 model release."

Do a search on "S Helper Service USRA Rebuild" and you'll turn up older posts when this model first hit the shelves. We'd like to think that the bad old days when manufacturer research consisted of copying Athearn's models, but unfortunately, this abomination shows that the practice is alive and well.

Ben Hom


Re: Search Function

Benjamin Hom
 

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"I entered Atlas USRA Rebuilds and received lots of hits from July and August 2013 discussions as well as discussions from the original, early 2011 model release."

Do a search on "S Helper Service USRA Rebuild" and you'll turn up older posts when this model first hit the shelves. We'd like to think that the bad old days when manufacturer research consisted of copying Athearn's models, but unfortunately, this abomination shows that the practice is alive and well.


Ben Hom


Re: Bettendorf catalogs

Douglas Harding
 

Gene, Brian Leppert posted about 20 pages from a 1907 Bettendorf catalog to the STMFC files the end of February. All were images about tank cars. Check

 

File : /Bettendorf Tank Car/page 44 001.jpg

Uploaded by : brianleppert@...

Description :

 

You can access this file at the URL:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/Bettendorf%20Tank%20Car/page%2044%20001.jpg

 

This the only think I have ever seen of a Bettendorf Catalog.

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 10:05 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Bettendorf catalogs

 

 

Has anyone ever come across any Bettendorf catalogs?  

Gene Green


Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs

Bill Welch
 

Thanks Elden & Ben

I knew the re-building program was the ultimate solution for the X29 but this started a couple of decades+ after they were built and the B&O apparently never did anything for their M-26. It is just curious to me.

Bill Welch


Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

Gene:

I was interested in their tendency to leak but was not aware of any sweating issue.

Bill Welch
==========

Slightly different discussion, but sweating was a big problem with ANY all steel roof, given the proper conditions. Jim Dick of the NPHS sent me copies of a considerable amount of correspondence generated in the Minneapolis milling district concerning this. It seems, during cold weather cars loaded with warm flour would have the moisture condense on the car roof as the load cooled, and rain back down on the load. This did not occure on older cars with outside metal roofs, since they had a layer of wood under the roof panels, or cars with inside metal roofs, because the outer board covering allowed the roof panels to warm with the load.

There was really no good solution to this, as the railroads had a lot of compelling reasons to go with the new all steel roofs. In later years, when bunkerless refrigerator cars (RB's or more commonly RBL's) became more common, these became the preferred car for flour loading, as they had a wood lining under the roof.

As a side note, one has to keep in mind that as long as the railroads were the only game in town for bulk shipments, they were not particularly responsive to customer complaints, often choosing to pay a certain amount in damage claims rather than spend additional capital funds on improving the car fleet.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Bettendorf catalogs

hees@...
 

The Smithsonian has three in their trade literature collection.

Randy Hees


Search Function

Eric Hansmann
 

I just used the search function at our YahooGroup site and it worked fine
using Chrome. There are two search boxes. A small one on the toolbar near
the New Message button is actually to search a message number. Use the
larger search box at the top, beside the Search Groups button. It is marked
as Search Conversations. You probably need to login to YahooGroups to use
the search function.
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/info


I entered Atlas USRA Rebuilds and received lots of hits from July and August
2013 discussions as well as discussions from the original, early 2011 model
release.


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX



________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 9:35 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Atlas HO USRA Steel Rebuilt Box Car

    I sure wish I could search Ben, but for some reason Yahoo doesn't want
us to do that anymore.  Could have saved a bunch of emails (grin).

Jon Miller


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Bill;

Some of the discussion I looked at focused mostly on one big thing: $$$$. It was decided that the least costly method to keep in service a very numerous, but obviously undersized and eventually obsolete car was to completely rebuild some of them (classes X29B, then X29D, then X29E, F, and G), and just patch the rusted out sides, and glop on asphaltum to help with leaks.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 9:34 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [STMFC] Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs



The reason for my interest is that RR's like the Maine Central and LNE who owned similar cars with the same roof design re-fitted them eventually with modern paneled roofs while I think CNJ ordered their cars with the more reliable Hutchins roof. I strikes me as interesting and maybe even mystifying why the two very large owners did not have a program for their leaky roofs and I wondered if they ever talked about it. I have never seen any mention of dealing with this problem in what I have read about the X29 and M-26.

Bill Welch



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs

Benjamin Hom
 

Bill Welch wrote:
"I strikes me as interesting and maybe even mystifying why the two very large owners did not have a program for their leaky roofs and I wondered if they ever talked about it. I have never seen any mention of dealing with this problem in what I have read about the X29 and M-26."

The Pennsy's solution for dealing with the problem was to rebuild the cars into Class X29B, X29D - X29G, and X29L.


Ben Hom


Re: PRR X29 and B&O M-26 roofs

Bill Welch
 

The reason for my interest is that RR's like the Maine Central and LNE who owned similar cars with the same roof design re-fitted them eventually with modern paneled roofs while I think CNJ ordered their cars with the more reliable Hutchins roof. I strikes me as interesting and maybe even mystifying why the two very large owners did not have a program for their leaky roofs and I wondered if they ever talked about it. I have never seen any mention of dealing with this problem in what I have read about the X29 and M-26.

Bill Welch

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