Date   

Auburn coal dock.

Curt Fortenberry
 

I've uploaded my photos of the small coal dock that existed at Auburn, Alabama (on the Western Railway of Alabama).  The color shots date from about 1973 (when I started at Auburn), and the b&w about 1976.  The dock shows up on the early Sanborn maps, but was gone by the mid-80s when I returned for a visit.  I only ever caught it being used the one time.


Curt Fortenberry


auburn_coal_dock by arrphoto



Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tony Thompson
 

       I've used the stainless tubing for a handrail "union" on several tank cars. My cutting technique is to put the handrail wire inside the tubing, then cut off both tubing and wire in one cut with an abrasive disk. That way, there are no burrs inside. Works perfectly, though a certain fraction of the cutoffs are now in new homes somewhere on my floor.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Stainless steel tubing

Bill Welch
 

Brass is very springy and it is hard to get it to behave, even with a good forming fixture, which Tom and I have.

Tom I misread the specs on the tubing you are using. If mine EVER comes, we should be using the same thing.

I also ordered more tubing to use with .015 wire as I have not made up my mind which wire size to use (yes despite all of the evidence). I am torn because I don't want the pipe unions to be too clunky. I don't remember if I have said it on this list but I have used .015 wire for the handrails on the 7-9 tank cars I have built so far because that was size of the Wire and Tubing Martin Lofton included in his 8K AC&F insulated tank car kit. I assumed it was correct and the rest is history. I even purchased a length of the .015 ID tubing from Martin to use with IM, L-L styrene models and Speedwitch and SC&F kits. I am very torn.

At some point soon, I will post photos of the fitting I use to cut the tubing.

Bill Welch


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

---In STMFC@..., <riverman_vt@...> wrote :

> Why the use of the two different types of wire, Tom? Is the stainless wire
> to stiff/difficult to make the required curvature for the end and bend to meet
> that on the sides? Are we speaking of stainless piano wire or something similar?

It's Detail Associates stainless steel wire, available in four sizes: 0.010", 0.012", 0.015" and 0.019". Straight, 12" lengths packed just like their brass wire, with stock numbers in the 3xxx series matching the 2xxx numbers of their brass wire. I use brass for the tank end handrails because it's much easier to form than the stainless. Even with a forming fixture I still do a lot of fiddling to get the end handrails to fit exactly. It's a leftover habit from my narrow gauge days when I did a lot of brass work - form the wire to fit exactly so that the solder, or in this case the splice, isn't under tension when the joint is completed.

I neglected to include the link Bill asked for in my previous reply. My 22 gauge (0.020" ID, 0.028" OD) stainless tubing came from Small Parts before Amazon took it over, but the Amazon link to the same tubing is:

 

A foot of it ($3.78) will make a LOT of unions. Enough to do lots of tank cars even if, like me, you have half of them go flying off into neverland when you're trying to maneuver them into position!


Tom Madden


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

> I really like the stiffness the SS wire would bring to the sides, a vulnerable area.
> I ordered my .019 ID SS tubing from "Small Parts," now "Amazon something"
> and it was supposed to come yesterday. It is spec'ed with an OD of .025 so
> I am afraid it will look clunky. Tom would you please share your tubing source
> and Part#? Thank you for posting the link.

Hmmmm. The 0.020" ID SS tubing has an OD of 0.028". That's the tubing I use to splice 0.019" handrails and is what's shown in the photo linked to my previous post. The next size down in the product line is 0.017" ID and 0.025" OD. If that's the size you ordered it will be fine for use with 0.015" handrails but not 0.019". The wall thickness on both sizes of tubing is 0.004". Seems to me a 0.028" OD splice on a 0.019" handrail (47% oversize) would be less visually distracting than an 0.025" OD splice on a 0.015" handrail (67% oversize).

The Resin Car Works web site has a couple of very useful late 1930's ACF drawings with all the pipe sizes called out. This one, from 1936, shows a tank car AB brake system:
And this 1939 drawing shows a dome platform and ladder:
All the railings and the train air line are 1 1/4" pipe. The supply line (branch pipe?) from the train air line to the brake valve is 1" pipe, and the air lines from the valve to the air reservoir and brake cylinder are 3/4" pipe.

Not sure why there's confusion on what wire size represents each of those pipe sizes in HO. Detail Associates prints that information on the packaging for all of their brass wire sizes: 0.012" wire represents 3/4" iron pipe, 0.015" represents 1" pipe and 0.019" represents 1 1/4" pipe.

Tom Madden 


Re: Clark Propst’s M&StL in video

Thomas Baker
 



​Clark,

I enjoyed the video of what was close to your final operating session--or possibly your very last.  A few years earlier, I appreciated the detailed article in RMC of your version of the M&StL in Mason City.  I purchased the RMC with the first installment and believe a second installment about the model railroad appeared the following month, but I have yet to locate a copy.  In any case, great work.  Will you do another version of the M&StL or will another railroad be the focus of your modeling efforts?

Tom Baker


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tim O'Connor
 


Thanks Tom! That's what I more or less expected I guess once the car is
painted and weathered the union will not stand out as much. A small price
to pay for greater durability!

Tim O'Connor



 Here's a link to a photo of a stainless steel tubing union joining a brass end handrail to a stainless side handrail on a Resin car Works acid tank car shell. The union is 0.020" I.D. and the handrails are 0.019" O.D.
  http://www.pullmanproject.com/SS%20Union.jpg


Re: Stainless steel tubing

riverman_vt@...
 

    Why the use of the two different types of wire, Tom? Is the stainless wire to stiff/difficult to make the
required curvature for the end and bend to meet that on the sides? Are we speaking of stainless piano
wire or something similar?

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Clark Propst’s M&StL in video

Clark Propst
 

I don’t know about genius, just prototype modeling. I plan to talk about building a portion of it at Naperville this year and will talk ideas for it’s replacement at the St Louis RPM.
 
I’m told an article on the layout in it’s present configuration (different from 2008) will be published later this year.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa
 
Clarke,

I never got to see your layout in person but it was always an inspiration to me. To model in a pure state using a switch list to build your roster from is so simple it’s genius. Building the layout around an actual town instead of Imagineering a track plan to fit the Gruesome Casket Company or other buildings you got for $1.00 at a swap is the way to go.

At our recent train show in Lagrange, IL I spotted the December 2008 RMC sitting in a pile of free magazines and grabbed it so I had a fresh copy to keep.

Sincerely,

Rob Manley



Re: Stainless steel tubing

Bill Welch
 

I really like the stiffness the SS wire would bring to the sides, a vulnerable area. I ordered my .019 ID SS tubing from "Small Parts," now "Amazon something" and it was supposed to come yesterday. It is spec'ed with an OD of .025 so I am afraid it will look clunky. Tom would you please share your tubing source and Part#? Thank you for posting the link.

Bill Welch


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

Here's a link to a photo of a stainless steel tubing union joining a brass end handrail to a stainless side handrail on a Resin car Works acid tank car shell. The union is 0.020" I.D. and the handrails are 0.019" O.D.

http://www.pullmanproject.com/SS%20Union.jpg

 Tom Madden


Re: e bay chuckle

Tom Madden
 

The old blue box Mantua reefer kits had paper sides. You'd buy the kit and then select the sides from the dealer's supply. The problem with the one on eBay is that one side was trimmed wrong. The printed legend "Mantua Metal Products Co., Woodbury Heights, N.J." is supposed to be trimmed off. Here's a scan I just made of an untrimmed Mantua reefer side I've had squirreled away for, oh, 60+ years. Still in the original cellophane wrapper.

http://www.pullmanproject.com/Crazy.jpg

 Tom Madden


Re: e bay chuckle

Jeff Pellas <jppellas@...>
 

Of almost every piece of model train rolling stock, no matter how generic, there was at least one real-world car that a given model was based on and therefore "reasonably" accurately depicted. I try to figure out what that original car was and what paint scheme went with it and then I look for that version to collect it. Of course there are usually many, many paint schemes and number variations of every car because the manufacturer was trying to sell as many models as possible so some research is required before I pull the trigger and pick one up. 
    As far as the Mantua Metal Lines cars go, I've acquired a caboose, gon and boxcar and examined them closely... and I'll be darned if I can figure out exactly what prototypes they depict. They are all "sort of" like something but not exactly like anything. The boxcar builds up into a nice looking car, in my opinion, but what is it? It is kind of like a "modernized" version of the USRA all steel boxcar with dreadnought ends, but the rivet pattern is all wrong for that. It might be a "modernized" 1932 ARA steel boxcar (PRR X29) but I believe only the PRR ever built them --and I've never seen PRR sides for that car (not saying they don't exist, just that I've never seen them). 
     If you're looking for a vintage model of a 1932 Modernized X29 boxcar, Lehigh Models made a pretty nice one with a metal frame, bakelite ends and roof and cardstock sides. Naturally they printed many card stock sides of many railroads which are fanciful but they did print PRR sides which are basically accurate. 
     No model train maker ever mass produced a model of an all steel USRA boxcar, even though they were once as ubiquitous as the PRR X29, until the recent release by BLI.  
      
Jeff
jppellas@...


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Ehni bpehni@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2015 9:52 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



I'm not that familiar with old Mantua, but that looks to be factory, which I would assume disqualifies it from a chuckle. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Apr 27, 2015, at 4:13 PM, 'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC] < STMFC@...> wrote:




Re: e bay chuckle

 

I'm not that familiar with old Mantua, but that looks to be factory, which I would assume disqualifies it from a chuckle. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)


Re: e bay chuckle

Charles Peck
 

This is a great reminder that there are lots of folks on the other end of the modeling spectrum.
A friend of mine sold an AHM caboose on ebay for something over $60 and bragged about
it for years. 
Here on the proto end of the scale we mostly talk to each other.  Manufacturers who want
to stay afloat need to remember that there are a lot more of the others than there are of us. 
We are very fortunate to have a few suppliers who cater to our niche market.
To those, I say THANK YOU!
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 6:41 PM, Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

That old kit is the rare "max headroom" ice reefer.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Apr 27, 2015, at 5:46 PM, "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


If I were starting a collection of misfit toys, those two would be on
the top of my "buy" list.

Yeesh.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/371293529593
http://www.ebay.com/itm/221756213234



Heated Car Placard Posted in photos

Bill Welch
 

I just posted a scan of a Heated Car Placard issued by BREX and dated 12-3-1930.


Bill Welch


Re: Working HO car brakes

Rio Grande Ltd <rgmodels@...>
 

st our recent West Side reunion there was a hopper train, 6 cars, that had operating hopper doors, in HO scale.

eric bracher



-----Original Message-----
From: LARRY larrywolohon@... [STMFC]
To: Era Freight cars, Steam
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2015 3:23 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Working HO car brakes

 
John & everybody else,

Ed Black built some HO cars probably at least 45 years ago with working brakes, at least turning the brake wheel would tighten or loosen the brakes on the trucks. He gave a clinic probably 15 years ago @ one of our Division 8 meetings of the North Central Region, of the NMRA, how he modeled these.

Larry Wolohon

From: "e27ca@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 27, 2015 11:28:09 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Very Small Plastic Tubing

 
Chuck,

The future was 25 years ago.  The 1990 NMRA convention contest in Pittsburgh featured Randy Anderson's scratch built HO Scale B&O O-27 gon with working hand brakes. 

John King  


Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

That old kit is the rare "max headroom" ice reefer.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Apr 27, 2015, at 5:46 PM, "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


If I were starting a collection of misfit toys, those two would be on
the top of my "buy" list.

Yeesh.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/371293529593
http://www.ebay.com/itm/221756213234


Re: e bay chuckle

Brian Termunde
 

So is:


... a steam era HyCube?

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT
 
"My Train of Thought left the station without me!"


Re: e bay chuckle

Benjamin Hom
 

Ed Mines wrote:
"See Mantua box car - Pacific Fruit Express"
http://www.ebay.com/itm/371293529593 (we think)

If you look beyond this silly paint job, the Mantua/Tyco DS reefer (NOT to be confused with the ex-Lindberg Mantua "Heavies" steel reefer) can be used as the basis for a poor man's R-30-21. See Bob Smaus' "Building PFE R-30-21's from Tyco Reefers" in the September 1992 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman.


Ben Hom

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