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Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

Tim asked:

> What do you use for a forming fixture? Can you post a photo? Forming
> the curved hand rails for tank cars is definitely a challenge!

Here's a photo of the cast resin forming fixture. They are $64 each from Resin Car Works but Frank will include an acid tank car kit for free. :)
Martin also included this in many of his tank car kits.

Tom Madden



Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tim O'Connor
 


clamp them with a hemostat or other scissor type clamp first so they
won't fly away



       I've used the stainless tubing for a handrail "union" on several tank cars. My cutting technique is to put the handrail wire inside the tubing, then cut off both tubing and wire in one cut with an abrasive disk. That way, there are no burrs inside. Works perfectly, though a certain fraction of the cutoffs are now in new homes somewhere on my floor.

Tony Thompson 


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill Welch wrote

Brass is very springy and it is hard to get it to behave, even with a
good forming fixture, which Tom and I have.

What do you use for a forming fixture? Can you post a photo? Forming
the curved hand rails for tank cars is definitely a challenge!

Tim O'Connor


Re: Auburn coal dock.

Charles Peck
 

Thank you Curt.  I'll be incorporating some details from your shot into a future project.
Very useful.
Regards, Chuck Peck

On Tue, Apr 28, 2015 at 1:49 PM, curtfortenberry@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I've uploaded my photos of the small coal dock that existed at Auburn, Alabama (on the Western Railway of Alabama).  The color shots date from about 1973 (when I started at Auburn), and the b&w about 1976.  The dock shows up on the early Sanborn maps, but was gone by the mid-80s when I returned for a visit.  I only ever caught it being used the one time.


Curt Fortenberry


auburn_coal_dock by arrphoto

auburn_coal_dock by arrphoto
This was a coal unloading trestle at Auburn, Alabama. I took the photos in 1973-1976 timeframe. previous page pages 1 2 ALL next page Auburn trestle...
Preview by Yahoo




Re: Stainless steel tubing

Bill Welch
 

Scott, it is pretty much the same one in Sunshine's kits and will be in the Yarmouth kit and I assume RCW is using ti too.

Bill Welch


Re: Clark Propst’s M&StL in video

Clark Propst
 

I don’t plan on tearing the layout down till towards the end of May. We’ll operate it at least once a week till then.
 
Someone has offered to put the thing for sale on eBay. That will be interesting!
 
I’ve been ruined by Charlie Duckworth. His layout and freight cars are to die for. I’ve been thinking about the next layout for a few years. We’ll have to see if it pans out?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa
 
 
 
Clark,

I enjoyed the video of what was close to your final operating session--or possibly your very last. A few years earlier, I appreciated the detailed article in RMC of your version of the M&StL in Mason City. I purchased the RMC with the first installment and believe a second installment about the model railroad appeared the following month, but I have yet to locate a copy. In any case, great work. Will you do another version of the M&StL or will another railroad be the focus of your modeling efforts?

Tom Baker

 


Re: Clark Propst’s M&StL in video

genegreen1942@...
 

Clark's layout is superb.  It is likely the best layout modeling I have ever seen.  I know many of you, perhaps most, have seen and enjoyed photos of Clark's layout and seen the high quality modeling and the good photography, too.  

BUT, for anyone familiar with Mason City or for someone who has walked the M&StL line through Mason City, the way Clark has captured scene after scene, each scene in proper sequence, has to be seen to be believed.  There does not appear to be any foreshortening, omissions or missing elements.  Somehow Clark squeezed in everything without making anything looked squeezed.

Okay, I'll confess a modicum of bias here.  Clark is a friend, I grew up 20 miles south of Mason City, went to school there, lived there, walked the M&StL with Clark and Doug Harding and am a slobbering M&StL freak, too.  Other than those tiny factors I am completely unbiased.

Gene Green


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

Scott Haycock asked:

> Could you tell us about this fixture? Or, maybe post a photo of it?

I posted a pdf file showing my method to the Files area last week. It's titled

Cutting_Stainless_Tubing.pdf

If that link doesn't work maybe this one will:

https://xa.yimg.com/df/STMFC/Cutting_Stainless_Tubing.pdf?token=2s_2J0cHdsmz12utbaf54KrpkmN8owY2J0-oKyissU75kb9_OnwcBQeuFkZpLDlfQi7sopncRQOo5sFciPhY7wJLUE-HZvz06fT2DDTlO-yL0n6vs7Vdm1oGzQ&type=download

Tom Madden


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2015

Douglas Harding
 

Scott I also had the that issue when I down loaded and attempted to view the file in Chrome. But once saved on my computer, in my TMK file, I was able to open and read the pdf with no trouble. I did not try a different browser so don’t know if it was the browser or not.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2015

Scott H. Haycock
 

Bruce,

I tried downloading the last issue, when it came out, and now this one, But all I get is the text, with no photos. Is there an alternate way to download these issues? 

Scott Haycock


 

Folks,


The Spring 2015 issue of the Keystone Modeler (No. 92) is now available for free download at:

This issue includes a review of the Rivarossi U25C, building an 80F81A tender for the BLI H10s, scratchbuilt FI flat and a Vandalia N6b cabin car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."





Re: Auburn coal dock.

Jared Harper
 

Curt,

This is totally cool.  Unfortunately the Alma branch didn't have a facility like this so I can't build one for my layout.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


---In STMFC@..., <curtfortenberry@...> wrote :

I've uploaded my photos of the small coal dock that existed at Auburn, Alabama (on the Western Railway of Alabama).  The color shots date from about 1973 (when I started at Auburn), and the b&w about 1976.  The dock shows up on the early Sanborn maps, but was gone by the mid-80s when I returned for a visit.  I only ever caught it being used the one time.


Curt Fortenberry


auburn_coal_dock by arrphoto



Re: Stainless steel tubing

Scott H. Haycock
 

 


Bill Welch Wrote:

"Brass is very springy and it is hard to get it to behave, even with a good forming fixture, which Tom and I have."


Bill, or Tom,

Could you tell us about this fixture? Or, maybe post a photo of it?


Scott Haycock 



The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2015

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

The Spring 2015 issue of the Keystone Modeler (No. 92) is now available for free download at:

This issue includes a review of the Rivarossi U25C, building an 80F81A tender for the BLI H10s, scratchbuilt FI flat and a Vandalia N6b cabin car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




Re: Stainless steel tubing

ed_mines
 

Years ago I used the same technique as Tony when building scientific equipment.


I currently cut the brass Albion tubes with a rat tail file with nothing inside the tubes and the tubes seem to be resistant to deforming.


There are a lot of brass bits in the carpet beneath my desk. Maybe the next person living here will think they are gold.


Ed Mines


Re: Auburn coal dock.

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Curt,

Very good images. Lots of details. Also very light rail and no tie plates. 

Thanks for sharing these wonderful images. Now I wonder just where something like this might fit on the layout.

Cheers,
— Bill



On Apr 28, 2015, at 10:49 AM, curtfortenberry@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


I've uploaded my photos of the small coal dock that existed at Auburn, Alabama (on the Western Railway of Alabama).  The color shots date from about 1973 (when I started at Auburn), and the b&w about 1976.  The dock shows up on the early Sanborn maps, but was gone by the mid-80s when I returned for a visit.  I only ever caught it being used the one time.



Curt Fortenberry


auburn_coal_dock by arrphoto





Auburn coal dock.

Curt Fortenberry
 

I've uploaded my photos of the small coal dock that existed at Auburn, Alabama (on the Western Railway of Alabama).  The color shots date from about 1973 (when I started at Auburn), and the b&w about 1976.  The dock shows up on the early Sanborn maps, but was gone by the mid-80s when I returned for a visit.  I only ever caught it being used the one time.


Curt Fortenberry


auburn_coal_dock by arrphoto



Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tony Thompson
 

       I've used the stainless tubing for a handrail "union" on several tank cars. My cutting technique is to put the handrail wire inside the tubing, then cut off both tubing and wire in one cut with an abrasive disk. That way, there are no burrs inside. Works perfectly, though a certain fraction of the cutoffs are now in new homes somewhere on my floor.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Stainless steel tubing

Bill Welch
 

Brass is very springy and it is hard to get it to behave, even with a good forming fixture, which Tom and I have.

Tom I misread the specs on the tubing you are using. If mine EVER comes, we should be using the same thing.

I also ordered more tubing to use with .015 wire as I have not made up my mind which wire size to use (yes despite all of the evidence). I am torn because I don't want the pipe unions to be too clunky. I don't remember if I have said it on this list but I have used .015 wire for the handrails on the 7-9 tank cars I have built so far because that was size of the Wire and Tubing Martin Lofton included in his 8K AC&F insulated tank car kit. I assumed it was correct and the rest is history. I even purchased a length of the .015 ID tubing from Martin to use with IM, L-L styrene models and Speedwitch and SC&F kits. I am very torn.

At some point soon, I will post photos of the fitting I use to cut the tubing.

Bill Welch


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

---In STMFC@..., <riverman_vt@...> wrote :

> Why the use of the two different types of wire, Tom? Is the stainless wire
> to stiff/difficult to make the required curvature for the end and bend to meet
> that on the sides? Are we speaking of stainless piano wire or something similar?

It's Detail Associates stainless steel wire, available in four sizes: 0.010", 0.012", 0.015" and 0.019". Straight, 12" lengths packed just like their brass wire, with stock numbers in the 3xxx series matching the 2xxx numbers of their brass wire. I use brass for the tank end handrails because it's much easier to form than the stainless. Even with a forming fixture I still do a lot of fiddling to get the end handrails to fit exactly. It's a leftover habit from my narrow gauge days when I did a lot of brass work - form the wire to fit exactly so that the solder, or in this case the splice, isn't under tension when the joint is completed.

I neglected to include the link Bill asked for in my previous reply. My 22 gauge (0.020" ID, 0.028" OD) stainless tubing came from Small Parts before Amazon took it over, but the Amazon link to the same tubing is:

 

A foot of it ($3.78) will make a LOT of unions. Enough to do lots of tank cars even if, like me, you have half of them go flying off into neverland when you're trying to maneuver them into position!


Tom Madden


Re: Stainless steel tubing

Tom Madden
 

---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

> I really like the stiffness the SS wire would bring to the sides, a vulnerable area.
> I ordered my .019 ID SS tubing from "Small Parts," now "Amazon something"
> and it was supposed to come yesterday. It is spec'ed with an OD of .025 so
> I am afraid it will look clunky. Tom would you please share your tubing source
> and Part#? Thank you for posting the link.

Hmmmm. The 0.020" ID SS tubing has an OD of 0.028". That's the tubing I use to splice 0.019" handrails and is what's shown in the photo linked to my previous post. The next size down in the product line is 0.017" ID and 0.025" OD. If that's the size you ordered it will be fine for use with 0.015" handrails but not 0.019". The wall thickness on both sizes of tubing is 0.004". Seems to me a 0.028" OD splice on a 0.019" handrail (47% oversize) would be less visually distracting than an 0.025" OD splice on a 0.015" handrail (67% oversize).

The Resin Car Works web site has a couple of very useful late 1930's ACF drawings with all the pipe sizes called out. This one, from 1936, shows a tank car AB brake system:
And this 1939 drawing shows a dome platform and ladder:
All the railings and the train air line are 1 1/4" pipe. The supply line (branch pipe?) from the train air line to the brake valve is 1" pipe, and the air lines from the valve to the air reservoir and brake cylinder are 3/4" pipe.

Not sure why there's confusion on what wire size represents each of those pipe sizes in HO. Detail Associates prints that information on the packaging for all of their brass wire sizes: 0.012" wire represents 3/4" iron pipe, 0.015" represents 1" pipe and 0.019" represents 1 1/4" pipe.

Tom Madden 

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