Date   

(No subject)

Dave Owens
 

Hello all:
The tentative schedule for NERPM in Collinsville, Conn. is now on our website.

http://neprototypemeet.com/NERPM%20Tenativeschedule%202015.pdf

One can also find registration information and photos of past meets.

I hope you'll consider joining us or attending any of the proto meets
that occur around the country through the year.

Thanks,
Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.

--
2015 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
May 29-30, 2015 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com
www.facebook.com/NERPM


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Paul Hillman
 


My question about the rivets is because Archer's patterns don't fit what I'm trying to build, but MM & MS patterns seem to. Thus, if MM or MS are 3D then I could invest in them. My local hobby shops don't carry any of them.
 
Trying to build some bridge gusset-plates, and other unique stuff, for STMFC freight cars to roll through.
 
Paul Hillman
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2015 7:35 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Microscale rivets ...

 

Once the cat is out of the bag, the copycats come out of the woodwork.

I figure if the project is worth hand applying rivets, it's worth getting the good ones.  I have been using Archer successfully for several years now.  I don't see any reason to change. 

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On May 16, 2015, at 8:12 PM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Richard Brennan wrote:

Chuck - You used "MicroMark"... which are an Archer Surface Details clone.


      I would say more in the character of a cheap copy. If you look closely at the Micromark product, they are misshapen and hardly any two are the same. But of course from a distance they do make a row of little dots. If you care, Archer rivets are far more consistent and are better shaped.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Microscale rivets ...

Andy Harman
 

Once the cat is out of the bag, the copycats come out of the woodwork.

I figure if the project is worth hand applying rivets, it's worth getting the good ones.  I have been using Archer successfully for several years now.  I don't see any reason to change. 

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On May 16, 2015, at 8:12 PM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Richard Brennan wrote:

Chuck - You used "MicroMark"... which are an Archer Surface Details clone.


      I would say more in the character of a cheap copy. If you look closely at the Micromark product, they are misshapen and hardly any two are the same. But of course from a distance they do make a row of little dots. If you care, Archer rivets are far more consistent and are better shaped.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Microscale rivets ...

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Brennan wrote:

Chuck - You used "MicroMark"... which are an Archer Surface Details clone.


      I would say more in the character of a cheap copy. If you look closely at the Micromark product, they are misshapen and hardly any two are the same. But of course from a distance they do make a row of little dots. If you care, Archer rivets are far more consistent and are better shaped.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Microscale rivets ...

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 5/16/2015 10:59 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
�

Paul

Yes the Micromark rivets are like Archer rivets. The question was whether anyone
knows about the Microscale rivet sheet, which may simply be flat decals.

I saw them in Caboose Hobbies the other day. Although they were in the usual Microscale envelopes, I ran my finger nail over them and they felt and looked embossed.

Spen Kellogg


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 07:15 AM 5/16/2015, 'Chuck Cover' chuck.cover@gmail.com [STMFC] wrote:
I have used the Microscale rivets on a number of projects and found them to be great. They are less expensive than the Archer. If you want to check out two projects to see the results: TKM #82 p16, Northumberland Water tower, and TKM #92 p21, 80F81a tender for BLI H10s.
Chuck - You used "MicroMark"... which are an Archer Surface Details clone.

The question was on the just-released MicroSCALE decals:
http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MD&Product_Code=87-1498


Flat or Raised?


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Mark Stamm
 

Tim 

You can get issue 92 from the Societies webpage. It is the most recent issue. 

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On May 16, 2015, at 12:32 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


Chuck, the rivets you used on the water tower were MicroMARK -- not MicroSCALE.

I don't have the #92 issue.

Tim O'Connor

Tim ;and list,
>
>I have used the Microscale rivets on a number of projects and found them to be great. They are less expensive than the Archer. If you want to check out two projects to see the results: TKM #82 p16, Northumberland Water tower, and TKM #92 p21, 80F81a tender for BLI H10s.
>
>Chuck Cover
>Santa Fe, NM


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Tim O'Connor
 

Paul

Yes the Micromark rivets are like Archer rivets. The question was whether anyone
knows about the Microscale rivet sheet, which may simply be flat decals.

Tim O'

Has it ever been answered if these other co.'s rivets are 3D like Archer, or 2D decals? I've read these many messages but don't recall that being answered.

Paul Hillman


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Paul Hillman
 

Has it ever been answered if these other co.'s rivets are 3D like Archer, or 2D decals? I've read these many messages but don't recall that being answered.
 
Paul Hillman
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2015 11:32 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Microscale rivets ...

 


Chuck, the rivets you used on the water tower were MicroMARK -- not MicroSCALE.

I don't have the #92 issue.

Tim O'Connor

Tim ;and list,
>
>I have used the Microscale rivets on a number of projects and found them to be great. They are less expensive than the Archer. If you want to check out two projects to see the results: TKM #82 p16, Northumberland Water tower, and TKM #92 p21, 80F81a tender for BLI H10s.
>
>Chuck Cover
>Santa Fe, NM


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Tim O'Connor
 

Chuck, the rivets you used on the water tower were MicroMARK -- not MicroSCALE.

I don't have the #92 issue.

Tim O'Connor





Tim ;and list,


I have used the Microscale rivets on a number of projects and found them to be great. They are less expensive than the Archer. If you want to check out two projects to see the results: TKM #82 p16, Northumberland Water tower, and TKM #92 p21, 80F81a tender for BLI H10s.

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM


Re: Tank car markings

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 5/16/2015 6:02 AM, caboose9792@... [STMFC] wrote:
Don't have the date offhand when they became mandatory on new construction.

    Because they didn't become mandatory!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Microscale rivets ...

mwbauers
 

Are they embossed or 'painted' ?

Mike Bauers


On May 16, 2015, at 9:15 AM, "'Chuck Cover' wrote:

 

Tim and list,

 

I have used the Microscale rivets on a number of projects and found them to be great.  


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Chuck Cover
 

Tim ;and list,

 

I have used the Microscale rivets on a number of projects and found them to be great.  They are less expensive than the Archer.  If you want to check out two projects to see the results:  TKM #82 p16, Northumberland Water tower, and TKM #92 p21, 80F81a tender for BLI H10s.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: RE: End-of-car vs under-frame cushioning

water.kresse@...
 

Thanks Rich,
 
I see that modern (offered today by Greenville) have long stroking end-of-car cushioning devices.
 
Where the full under-frame cushioning devices too complicated? . . . not cost effective? . . . whatever other reason?  Or did trucks eventually take that market over?
 
Al Kresse . . . stretching what just started in the last years of the late steam era (post-1956 for the C&O)


From: "cinderandeight@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 9:45:02 PM
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] RE: End-of-car vs under-frame cushioning

 
Elden,
    A few comments on this.  First the PRR had cushioned under frame cars in late 1950 in the form of the leased GAEX box car fleet, which was added to in 1955.  These cars had Waugh end of car cushioning which I believe was a descendent of the Duryea under frames.(maybe someone can enlighten me on this?)  I think these cars were leased to study both under frame cushioning, and loader equipment (they had Evans DF units), plus other design features such as stronger sidesill/under frame construction to deal with fork truck stress, and heavy duty door posts..
    As you state, the X48 from Pullman Standard was the first group of purchased cars with cushioned under frames (the GAEX cars later were bought in 1960 after the ten year leases expired).    The same under frames went into the X29E as you have said, but the same technology also went into the class X52 50' 6" box cars I believe.
    I spent a pleasant hour under a X52 in a bad order yard once as a young man.  It was raining hard, and I had my choice of climbing into an open box car, or under a X52.  I could see there was no chance of car movements, they had sat there for years, so I went under the car to examine the cushion under frame (and stay dry).
    I question the "rubber draft gear" comment.  The car clearly had a sliding center sill, and large flexible hoses to take up the slack for the brake lines.  If you check car diagrams it is pretty apparent that the X29E and X52 under frames are the same creatures, only with the later being 10' longer.
I agree that the PRR was slow to adopt cushioning on box cars, and most of the real developments came after this list's time line.
    Rich Burg


Re: Tank car markings

caboose9792@...
 

Safety dome covers that cannot be removed with the cars under pressure. Don't have the date offhand when they became mandatory on new construction.

Mark Rickert
 
In a message dated 5/12/2015 4:12:59 P.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

What was the meaning of the diamond marking on the dome of some ICC 103 tank cars?

Andy Miller

.


Re: Microscale rivets ...

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tim,

We were all waiting for you to risk your money first. :~)

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 5/15/15 8:06 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


I was wondering if anyone had purchased these and found them to
be useful (or useless) ... We speculated on them a while back but
I don't recall if anyone actually saw them or used them.

Tim O'Connor



some more Ebay auctions -- RI/SP/C&O

Tim O'Connor
 

Challenger SP S-12 0-6-0 Oakland Mole passenger switcher
http://www.ebay.com/itm/321756282222

Overland RI C-415 in maroon paint
http://www.ebay.com/itm/321756254794

Overland C&O F-9 55' Greenville well flat car with transformers load
http://www.ebay.com/itm/321756291247

Thanks!

Tim O'Connor


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: RE: End-of-car vs under-frame cushioning

cinderandeight@...
 

Elden,
    A few comments on this.  First the PRR had cushioned under frame cars in late 1950 in the form of the leased GAEX box car fleet, which was added to in 1955.  These cars had Waugh end of car cushioning which I believe was a descendent of the Duryea under frames.(maybe someone can enlighten me on this?)  I think these cars were leased to study both under frame cushioning, and loader equipment (they had Evans DF units), plus other design features such as stronger sidesill/under frame construction to deal with fork truck stress, and heavy duty door posts..
    As you state, the X48 from Pullman Standard was the first group of purchased cars with cushioned under frames (the GAEX cars later were bought in 1960 after the ten year leases expired).    The same under frames went into the X29E as you have said, but the same technology also went into the class X52 50' 6" box cars I believe.
    I spent a pleasant hour under a X52 in a bad order yard once as a young man.  It was raining hard, and I had my choice of climbing into an open box car, or under a X52.  I could see there was no chance of car movements, they had sat there for years, so I went under the car to examine the cushion under frame (and stay dry).
    I question the "rubber draft gear" comment.  The car clearly had a sliding center sill, and large flexible hoses to take up the slack for the brake lines.  If you check car diagrams it is pretty apparent that the X29E and X52 under frames are the same creatures, only with the later being 10' longer.
I agree that the PRR was slow to adopt cushioning on box cars, and most of the real developments came after this list's time line.
    Rich Burg


Microscale rivets ...

Tim O'Connor
 

I was wondering if anyone had purchased these and found them to
be useful (or useless) ... We speculated on them a while back but
I don't recall if anyone actually saw them or used them.

Tim O'Connor


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: PRR G22, and G22B gons (UNCLASSIFIED)

Aaron Heaney
 

Ops sorry it is Wolfhunt1987@...

Aaron Heaney 


On May 15, 2015, at 8:50 AM, "'Gatwood, Elden SAW' elden.j.gatwood@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Aaron;

I need your e-mail address!

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2015 4:05 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] PRR G22, and G22B gons (UNCLASSIFIED)



Elden


I was wondering if you have photos of the G22 subway haulers.


Aaron Heaney



On Thursday, May 14, 2015 9:25 AM, "'Gatwood, Elden SAW' elden.j.gatwood@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Group;

I was thinking about the G22 and subclasses last night, and was reminded once again how many cool variants that did put together, including the many container carriers, and even the subway movers they converted from G22.

If anyone has interest, please ask, and we can dialogue on-list. I can also share photos; I won't post photos, and ask that they not be shared, but if you contact me with your e-mail address with your subjects of interest, we will be good to go.

Elden Gatwood


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 13, 2015 2:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] PRR G22B gon



Can't speak to the trucks, but Scalecoat Oxide Red is my default colour for PRR.


Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 5/13/2015 2:45 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] wrote:




Would 2D-F8 trucks be appropriate for these?




What modern day paint would you recommend?




The one piece Westerfield model has the underframe cast in as part of the one piece casting.




Ed Mines




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE








Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


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