Date   

Re: Weed sprayer

Charles Hladik
 

    When I did a PWD tar truck I used sprue  to do the bottom rear sprayer ( the only one). The ladder idea sound reasonable.
 
Chuck Hladik
 

In a message dated 5/29/2015 8:35:47 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Wow! What a homely looking critter. 


Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 29, 2015, at 5:15 PM, Clark Cooper csc@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Rich,

Not long ago the Great Northern Hysterical Society offered a kit for just such a thing:

https://www.gnrhs.org/sold_out_kits.htm

Being a member of said Society, I have one of those kits. The illustrated directions have you fabricating something out of the included styrene rod and some brass wire. Doesn't look very complicated. If you want a copy of that page, let me know.

-Clark Cooper
(the other Iowa Clark)
On May 29, 2015, at 7:05 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] wrote:

> 
> For the track level sprayers, cut down ladders is exactly what I am planning on using. It's the topside sprayers, which look like some kind of cannons, that are the problem. And, yes, I have looked for cannons that would work (from military model sites) but I have not found any suitable ones.
>  
> Richard Townsend 
> Lincoln City, Oregon
>  



Re: Tru-Color and Accu-Paint reducer

Tim O'Connor
 

Scott you must be new :-)

Accupaint, Star (P-B-L), and TruColor are (were) all made by the same
industrial supplier and are essentially the same although ratios of thinner
and retarder do seem to vary. (I used to watch George Bishop bottle his
Accupaint and he would dilute the paint while bottling.) The supplier was
originally 'discovered' by Fred Becker of Front Range -- good to know if
you ever need to strip an old Front Range model.

Tim O'Connor

---------------------------------

Are you saying that these two brands are similar enough that
automotive lacquer thinner works equally well with each?
Scott Haycock


Re: Tru-Color and Accu-Paint reducer

Scott H. Haycock
 

But Andy,
You're talking about Accu-Paint. I thought the conversation was about Tru-Color.

Are you saying that these two brands are similar enough that automotive lacquer thinner works equally well with each?

The idea of a reducer, IIRC, also referred to as an extender, to slow the drying time, is common to many other paint usages, like furniture, woodwork, etc. Have you tried the Hi-Gloss with Tru-Color? Do you know who manufactures Hi-Gloss? It sounds like a viable product on several levels in our hobby. I want some!

Scott Haycock  


 

Hello-

I was convinced years ago by a Jim Six article on Accu-paint. Jim said that he reduced all of his Accu-paint with automotive lacquer thinner (much better than the hardware store lacquer thinner, which I use for clean-up) for his Accu-Paint jobs. Although a friend of mine gets good results with the hardware store thinner).

I use "Hot Shop"automotive acrylic lacquer reducer. Called hot shop for use in hot weather so the lacquer won't dry before it lands on the intended surface, creating a dull finish. It is also called "Hi-Gloss" because its lower volitility stays wet longer producing a nice gloss.

I am very satisfied with these results over the years, and I see no reason to change now. A gallon can is not too expensive, about what a quart of Tru-color reducer would cost. The Accu-Paint thinner had alcohol and acetone, which I believe automotive lacquer reducers also have.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: dental wax

mwbauers
 

There's also a two-part silicone putty from the regular molding and casting guys.

Make two equal balls, kneed them together, press on the object....... and wait five minutes. You get a silicone mold.

Both Smooth-on and Alumilite have it.

Best to ya...
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi, USA



On May 29, 2015, at 5:29 PM, Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


There is a material called dental impression putty. Two part stuff like an epoxy.
Available from many sources including Amazon.  I have no experience at using it.
Chuck Peck

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 6:12 PM, Mark P Stamm mark@... [STMFC]<STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Micro Mark carries a rubber mold making material that is reusable.  You heat the rubber material in the microwave pour your mold, cast and than you can create a new mold by reheating the mold material in the microwave. I have not tried it but it seems like an interesting solution to creating molds. 

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On May 29, 2015, at 2:50 PM, edb8391@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Ed and all,

When I had impressions taken for making a 5 unit bridge for my lower right jaw in 2005, the dentist used a hard setting epoxy-like resin.  It was sort of purple in color, very soft and mushy when put on. Remarkably hard when set.  I don't know if dental wax is made or used anymore.


Ed Bommer


Re: Tru-Color and Accu-Paint reducer

mwbauers
 

Andy,

Does the stuff work nice with plastics ?

To give you a benchmark on that with me.......... I even get ordinary ScaleCoat paint [type-one] to work okay on plastics.

Best to ya...
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi, USA

On May 29, 2015, at 9:01 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Hello-

I was convinced years ago by a Jim Six article on Accu-paint. Jim said that he reduced all of his Accu-paint with automotive lacquer thinner (much better than the hardware store lacquer thinner, which I use for clean-up) for his Accu-Paint jobs. Although a friend of mine gets good results with the hardware store thinner).

I use "Hot Shop"automotive acrylic lacquer reducer. Called hot shop for use in hot weather so the lacquer won't dry before it lands on the intended surface, creating a dull finish. It is also called "Hi-Gloss" because its lower volitility stays wet longer producing a nice gloss.

I am very satisfied with these results over the years, and I see no reason to change now. A gallon can is not too expensive, about what a quart of Tru-color reducer would cost. The Accu-Paint thinner had alcohol and acetone, which I believe automotive lacquer reducers also have.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Tru-Color and Accu-Paint reducer

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy

I've used a different automotive lacquer thinner, but not with Accupaint,
since I still have a good supply of the AP thinner (I bought 5 or 6 of the
large bottles at some point). But when I run out I'll definitely try the
automotive products. Usually when AP gives a dull finish it just means I
need to add thinner.

Tim O'

I was convinced years ago by a Jim Six article on Accu-paint. Jim said that he reduced all of his Accu-paint with automotive lacquer thinner (much better than the hardware store lacquer thinner, which I use for clean-up) for his Accu-Paint jobs. Although a friend of mine gets good results with the hardware store thinner).

I use "Hot Shop"automotive acrylic lacquer reducer. Called hot shop for use in hot weather so the lacquer won't dry before it lands on the intended surface, creating a dull finish. It is also called "Hi-Gloss" because its lower volitility stays wet longer producing a nice gloss.

I am very satisfied with these results over the years, and I see no reason to change now. A gallon can is not too expensive, about what a quart of Tru-color reducer would cost. The Accu-Paint thinner had alcohol and acetone, which I believe automotive lacquer reducers also have.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Tru-Color and Accu-Paint reducer

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-

I was convinced years ago by a Jim Six article on Accu-paint. Jim said that he reduced all of his Accu-paint with automotive lacquer thinner (much better than the hardware store lacquer thinner, which I use for clean-up) for his Accu-Paint jobs. Although a friend of mine gets good results with the hardware store thinner).

I use "Hot Shop"automotive acrylic lacquer reducer. Called hot shop for use in hot weather so the lacquer won't dry before it lands on the intended surface, creating a dull finish. It is also called "Hi-Gloss" because its lower volitility stays wet longer producing a nice gloss.

I am very satisfied with these results over the years, and I see no reason to change now. A gallon can is not too expensive, about what a quart of Tru-color reducer would cost. The Accu-Paint thinner had alcohol and acetone, which I believe automotive lacquer reducers also have.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


From: "'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 5:05 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Tru Color Paint Stripper?

 
Allen,

While Tru Color is acetone based, I wouldn’t rush out to buy acetone as a diluent. Acetone is good for cleanup, but I stay with the manufacturer’s thinner for dilutions. Tru Color’s web site says that you may lose the gloss finish if you use acetone for a dilution thinner. Since I haven’t tried diluting with acetone, I can’t speak to the results. The solvent base in Tru Color is more complicated than just acetone.

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 4:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tru Color Paint Stripper?

FWIW, I use Home Depot Mineral Spirits for my thinner. I have good success with both Floquil and Tru Color. Evidently not together in small amounts. Nelson, thanks for telling me that Tru color is Acetone based. I will by a can of that and see if it works better than mineral spirits. As I do a lot of airbrushing, my wallet finds that this is the best way to go.

Allen

On Friday, May 29, 2015 1:11 PM, "Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]" wrote:

This has been an interesting thread. I too believe that the results that Nelson reports are from too high pressure. The pressure that I find best with TruColor is about 15-20 psi.

Increasingly, Tru-Color is my go-to paint, very forgiving and producing a lovely smooth finish. I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner. Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.

I am not above stripping flawed paint finishes, but I believe that I would first try the other simpler methods already advised.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD

Okoboji, IA






Re: WLE 84110 or maybe 24110. was RE: Re: completing a Richard Hendrickson freight car

Allan Smith
 

There is a photo of AC&F 30000 on page 125,129,404 of the 1940 Car Builders Cyclopedia that matches the car in the Hendrickson photo


Al Smith
Sonora Ca

On Monday, May 25, 2015 7:08 PM, "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Thank you, Bob, I kind of wondered . . .

So, going back to my original question . . .

"But as is all too often the case, I'm distracted by the box car in the
prototype photo, because of the end design. It doesn't look very much like
a "standard" dreadnaught (knowing there's not really any such thing) but
more like a Hutchins end. Do you or does any of the esteemed readers of
this list know anything about that car?"

The picture is the prototype shot in Tony's original post about completing
one of Richard's in-process models. You can find it here:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2015/05/completing-richard-hendrickson-fre
ight.html

The car number is very fuzzy in the photo, and my subject line is a guess -
depends on how you squint at a blown-up image of the end number.

Schuyler

To the Group:

I really made a muddle of my comments about these box car ends. Offline
someone kindly pointed out my error.

Maybe I need new glasses, but after looking at the photo with the end view
of the WLE box car again, I see it is some type of 4/4 end with some very
unusual corrugation patterns on the end. The manufacturer of these ends I
now admit is unknown to me. The Pullman-Standard ends I discussed were 4/5
for 40-ft cars and 5/5 for the 50-ft cars with similar, but smaller
corrugations.

Bob Witt

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Re: Weed sprayer

Scott H. Haycock
 

Richard,

If it looks like a small cannon, couldn't you turn it from a piece of styrene rod in a drill or press, using some small files and sandpaper?

Scott haycock


 

For the track level sprayers, cut down ladders is exactly what I am planning on using. It's the topside sprayers, which look like some kind of cannons, that are the problem. And, yes, I have looked for cannons that would work (from military model sites) but I have not found any suitable ones.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
 


Re: Weed sprayer

A&Y Dave in MD
 

What about a fire fighting tug sprayer?

$90 would be too much for the sprayer only, but ask the manufacturer or see if someone else offers just the detail.

Dave


Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On May 29, 2015, at 8:05 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

For the track level sprayers, cut down ladders is exactly what I am planning on using. It's the topside sprayers, which look like some kind of cannons, that are the problem. And, yes, I have looked for cannons that would work (from military model sites) but I have not found any suitable ones.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, May 29, 2015 5:00 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Weed sprayer

 
I think I would be looking through bits of sprue or else split a plastic ladder lengthwise
to leave pieces of rung hanging down as nozzles.
Chuck Peck 

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 6:55 PM, Patrick Wade patwadesb@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
Walthers has or had an oil loading rack kit. There were arms that swung over the tank car dooms to fill the cars. Perhaps one of these arms would work.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 3:08 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
I want to build a model of a weed sprayer with roof-top sprayer guns in addition to the track-level sprayer arms. My problem is coming up with something to use for the topside sprayer guns. I thought about water cannons from the Revell fire boat, but they are too big. Any suggestions?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
     



Re: Weed sprayer

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Wow! What a homely looking critter. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 29, 2015, at 5:15 PM, Clark Cooper csc@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Rich,

Not long ago the Great Northern Hysterical Society offered a kit for just such a thing:

https://www.gnrhs.org/sold_out_kits.htm

Being a member of said Society, I have one of those kits. The illustrated directions have you fabricating something out of the included styrene rod and some brass wire. Doesn't look very complicated. If you want a copy of that page, let me know.

-Clark Cooper
(the other Iowa Clark)
On May 29, 2015, at 7:05 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] wrote:

> 
> For the track level sprayers, cut down ladders is exactly what I am planning on using. It's the topside sprayers, which look like some kind of cannons, that are the problem. And, yes, I have looked for cannons that would work (from military model sites) but I have not found any suitable ones.
>  
> Richard Townsend 
> Lincoln City, Oregon
>  



Re: Weed sprayer

Clark Cooper
 

Rich,

Not long ago the Great Northern Hysterical Society offered a kit for just such a thing:

https://www.gnrhs.org/sold_out_kits.htm

Being a member of said Society, I have one of those kits. The illustrated directions have you fabricating something out of the included styrene rod and some brass wire. Doesn't look very complicated. If you want a copy of that page, let me know.

-Clark Cooper
(the other Iowa Clark)

On May 29, 2015, at 7:05 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] wrote:


For the track level sprayers, cut down ladders is exactly what I am planning on using. It's the topside sprayers, which look like some kind of cannons, that are the problem. And, yes, I have looked for cannons that would work (from military model sites) but I have not found any suitable ones.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Re: Tru Color Paint Stripper?

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Allen,



While Tru Color is acetone based, I wouldn’t rush out to buy acetone as a diluent. Acetone is good for cleanup, but I stay with the manufacturer’s thinner for dilutions. Tru Color’s web site says that you may lose the gloss finish if you use acetone for a dilution thinner. Since I haven’t tried diluting with acetone, I can’t speak to the results. The solvent base in Tru Color is more complicated than just acetone.



Nelson Moyer





From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 4:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tru Color Paint Stripper?





FWIW, I use Home Depot Mineral Spirits for my thinner. I have good success with both Floquil and Tru Color. Evidently not together in small amounts. Nelson, thanks for telling me that Tru color is Acetone based. I will by a can of that and see if it works better than mineral spirits. As I do a lot of airbrushing, my wallet finds that this is the best way to go.

Allen





On Friday, May 29, 2015 1:11 PM, "Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:





This has been an interesting thread. I too believe that the results that Nelson reports are from too high pressure. The pressure that I find best with TruColor is about 15-20 psi.



Increasingly, Tru-Color is my go-to paint, very forgiving and producing a lovely smooth finish. I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner. Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.



I am not above stripping flawed paint finishes, but I believe that I would first try the other simpler methods already advised.



Denny



Denny S. Anspach MD

Okoboji, IA















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Weed sprayer

Richard Townsend
 

For the track level sprayers, cut down ladders is exactly what I am planning on using. It's the topside sprayers, which look like some kind of cannons, that are the problem. And, yes, I have looked for cannons that would work (from military model sites) but I have not found any suitable ones.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, May 29, 2015 5:00 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Weed sprayer

 
I think I would be looking through bits of sprue or else split a plastic ladder lengthwise
to leave pieces of rung hanging down as nozzles.
Chuck Peck 

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 6:55 PM, Patrick Wade patwadesb@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
Walthers has or had an oil loading rack kit. There were arms that swung over the tank car dooms to fill the cars. Perhaps one of these arms would work.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 3:08 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
I want to build a model of a weed sprayer with roof-top sprayer guns in addition to the track-level sprayer arms. My problem is coming up with something to use for the topside sprayer guns. I thought about water cannons from the Revell fire boat, but they are too big. Any suggestions?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
     



Re: Weed sprayer

Charles Peck
 

I think I would be looking through bits of sprue or else split a plastic ladder lengthwise
to leave pieces of rung hanging down as nozzles.
Chuck Peck 

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 6:55 PM, Patrick Wade patwadesb@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Walthers has or had an oil loading rack kit. There were arms that swung over the tank car dooms to fill the cars. Perhaps one of these arms would work.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 3:08 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I want to build a model of a weed sprayer with roof-top sprayer guns in addition to the track-level sprayer arms. My problem is coming up with something to use for the topside sprayer guns. I thought about water cannons from the Revell fire boat, but they are too big. Any suggestions?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
     




Re: Weed sprayer

Patrick Wade
 

Walthers has or had an oil loading rack kit. There were arms that swung over the tank car dooms to fill the cars. Perhaps one of these arms would work.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Thu, May 28, 2015 at 3:08 PM, richtownsend@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I want to build a model of a weed sprayer with roof-top sprayer guns in addition to the track-level sprayer arms. My problem is coming up with something to use for the topside sprayer guns. I thought about water cannons from the Revell fire boat, but they are too big. Any suggestions?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
     



Re: dental wax

Charles Peck
 

There is a material called dental impression putty. Two part stuff like an epoxy.
Available from many sources including Amazon.  I have no experience at using it.
Chuck Peck

On Fri, May 29, 2015 at 6:12 PM, Mark P Stamm mark@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Micro Mark carries a rubber mold making material that is reusable.  You heat the rubber material in the microwave pour your mold, cast and than you can create a new mold by reheating the mold material in the microwave. I have not tried it but it seems like an interesting solution to creating molds. 

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On May 29, 2015, at 2:50 PM, edb8391@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Ed and all,

When I had impressions taken for making a 5 unit bridge for my lower right jaw in 2005, the dentist used a hard setting epoxy-like resin.  It was sort of purple in color, very soft and mushy when put on. Remarkably hard when set.  I don't know if dental wax is made or used anymore.


Ed Bommer





Re: dental wax

Mark Stamm
 

Micro Mark carries a rubber mold making material that is reusable.  You heat the rubber material in the microwave pour your mold, cast and than you can create a new mold by reheating the mold material in the microwave. I have not tried it but it seems like an interesting solution to creating molds. 

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On May 29, 2015, at 2:50 PM, edb8391@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Ed and all,

When I had impressions taken for making a 5 unit bridge for my lower right jaw in 2005, the dentist used a hard setting epoxy-like resin.  It was sort of purple in color, very soft and mushy when put on. Remarkably hard when set.  I don't know if dental wax is made or used anymore.


Ed Bommer




Re: USRA single sheathed box cars flooring questions

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <jayrs9@...> wrote :
Dennis, thanks for a peak inside the working of the Pullman Library.  I sent an email query to them a couple days ago using the address in the link you gave (pullmanlibrary@...) but have not heard back.  Is there a more specific email address, I fear my email might have fallen into some deep hole.

Jay Ruppel

=========

Give it a week. The Pullman Library is 100% volunteer staffed, usually Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. There is not much reason to check the e-mail at other times, as the answers will all be out at the library. If you don't get a reply by next Wednesday, give them a call at the number at the contact link I posted.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Tru Color Paint Stripper?

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Denny wrote:

 

[Snip] I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner.  Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.

 

It took a while but I finally realized that with a gravity feed airbrush, I didn’t need to thin Floquil at all…

 

Jack Burgess

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