Date   

Re: This image and the next three

Dennis Storzek
 

There was never any requirement to have poling pockets. They were a defensive move by the railroads; otherwise creative switchmen would jam the pole wherever they though it wouldn't slip, and if it happened to damage the car, not their problem. Same thing with roping staples; railroads started adding them to keep customers with car movers from ripping the sill steps off. It's a good bet that's how that queenpost disappeared.

Apparently, the DL&W was cheap, and wouldn't spend the money on either.

Dennis Storzek


Re: This image and the next three

Charles Peck
 

I looked at all three photos and all I see on the corners is a large cast washer under the nut that
fastens the outer truss rod to the end sill.  
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 10:07 AM, John Larkin jflarkingrc@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I can see what appears to be a poling pocket on the first car in the series.  The rest would, of course, be hidden.

John Larkin



1930 C&O Box car instructions

Doug Pillow
 

Hi All'

Anyone have instructions for 1930 C&O box car they can scan and e mail me. Yankee Clipper or Funaro and Carmelengo will work. E mail is jssp46@.... It would be most appreciated.


                                                                                  Thank You

                                                                                  Doug Pillow


Re: This image and the next three

John Larkin
 

I can see what appears to be a poling pocket on the first car in the series.  The rest would, of course, be hidden.

John Larkin


Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

Tim O'Connor
 

hmmmm... I think micrometer or calipers (to measure the maximum separation)
then a calculator to determine the spacing (down to .001) and then the micrometer
again open to exactly that -- then set my locking dividers to that measurement.

then poke, twist, poke, twist, poke, twist, poke ... each rung is marked on a straight
line.

done.

Tim O'Connor

The technique works with notebook paper or any other set of parallel lines as long as they are spaced closer than your desired spacing. You don't even need a ruler! Just transfer the distance between the top and bottom to your cardstock, then place one mark on the first line, and swing the other till it is on the seventh line (or six or five for fewer rungs). Mark the intersections on your template and you have your rung spacing. If you really want it to the gnats a.., pick the distance off the model with locking dividers, swing those to the number of desired rungs, then butt your template edge against the dividers and mark or draw a line on the parallel lines and reset the dividers to the interval along the line. What you are doing is using the equal interval of the parallel lines to divide the uneven distance. It's a slick trick you can use for all sorts of evenly spaced layout tasks like gondola ribs, panel seams, window mullions, etc.

John


Re: Sheet lead

Jared Harper
 

I got mine from McMaster--Carr also.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


---In STMFC@..., <gsgondola@...> wrote :

Sheet lead is easier to get in Califonia than in Ohio.  It's not used for roofing around here.  I got mine from McMaster-Carr direct.

Sent from my little plastic pop tart

On Jun 16, 2015, at 5:18 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Paul Catapano wrote:

 

Re: source for sheet lead

Did anyone suggest roofers, or rain gutter installers? If you are in California forget it. Almost anywhere else though.


     Both professional plumbing shops AND roofers supply stores DO sell sheet lead in California. I just verified that with some phone calls.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Perhaps, a photo has been posted

Aley, Jeff A
 

Schuyler,

 

               Perhaps not.

               I find no such folder, and no photos awaiting my approval.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, STMFC

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2015 4:07 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Perhaps, a photo has been posted

 

 

Pending, of course, authorization from the Boss (Brock, not Springsteen) you may be able to find a photo in a folder cleverly named “PRR & ERIE box cars,” in which you may find an image of such cars (one each), coupled together, on a siding somewhere in (presumably) North America.  I have no idea whether the photo actually made it into the folder, as a notation appeared advising that “An error has occurred.”

 

I also have no idea where this photo was taken, nor when, nor what is happening.  It’s a postcard which was given to me, and I scanned it so it won’t deteriorate any more than it has already.

 

I hope you can see it.  Any information will be dutifully recorded along with the image in my files.

 

Schuyler


Re: Sheet lead sources

Jared Harper
 

I bought a square foot.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


---In STMFC@..., <ted_waterhouse@...> wrote :

Yeah, McMaster-Carr looks like a perfect and easy source - assuming they'll sell me a 6"x6" piece with no minimum order - will pursue it. Many thanks, Ted Waterhouse
--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 6/16/15, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Sheet lead sources
To: STMFC@...
Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2015, 10:41 AM


 









Actually, the answer to this question is the source
of EVERYTHING in the world except gifts for the missus;
McMaster Carr Co.  They stock sheet lead in
multiple thickness, pre-cut in various sheet sizes from
6" x 6" to 48" x 48", and it will come
in a plain brown wrapper so your neighbors won't know
you are poluting the planet. :-)

Lets see if a direct link works:

McMaster-Carr



McMaster-Carr
McMaster-Carr
supplies products used to maintain manufacturing plants and
large commercial facilities worldwide.




View on www.mcmaster.com


Preview by Yahoo
 









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Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

gewaldphoto
 

It's a common trick from drafting to use a ruler or other object with evenly spaced markings on it to divide a line into equal units. The example in the blog post is more complicated than I remember the technique. Much easier than measuring to four decimal points and trying to get a spacing without a strange remainder left over.

No need for the parallel lines at 30 degrees in the blog post. I would recommend just making a right triangle where one side is the distance between the top and bottom rungs of the ladder. The other right angle side would be the bottom rung position on the ladder and would extend out as far as you need it to make the the long end, or hypotenuse, a convenient length. For seven steps that might be 1.5 inches with a mark at each quarter inch or it could be 5/16ths if that is easier, then use a T-square to transfer the marks on the hypotenuse over to the side that corresponds with the distance from the top to the bottom rung. In drafting we had triangle shaped rulers with inches divided in different ways on the 6 different edges. Much easier to use than a standard ruler in inches. One might be in 1/10ths of an inch, another in 1/12ths, another in 1/6ths and so on. Centimeters and millimeters might be easier than inches and fractions of an inch.

You can easily adapt this to any scale, just use bigger spaces on the ruler and angle it so you get enough divisions you need.

Garrett







--
Sent from Postbox


Perhaps, a photo has been posted

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Pending, of course, authorization from the Boss (Brock, not Springsteen) you may be able to find a photo in a folder cleverly named “PRR & ERIE box cars,” in which you may find an image of such cars (one each), coupled together, on a siding somewhere in (presumably) North America.  I have no idea whether the photo actually made it into the folder, as a notation appeared advising that “An error has occurred.”

 

I also have no idea where this photo was taken, nor when, nor what is happening.  It’s a postcard which was given to me, and I scanned it so it won’t deteriorate any more than it has already.

 

I hope you can see it.  Any information will be dutifully recorded along with the image in my files.

 

Schuyler


Re: This image and the next three

mwbauers
 

So…… [might be a silly question of mine]

Were these cars mainly used to ship the stored ice from the warehouses to the distributors in the warmer months of the year?

Its hard to see from the angle………

Are the loading doors similar to regular hinged reefer doors………. or sliding plug doors?

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Jun 21, 2015, at 5:14 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

his photo is from 1912. The "boxcars" on the siding are actually ice cars, which were insulated and had plug doors, most of which were built for ice service and not intended or marked for interchange. The Pocono Mountains had many lakes and ice harvesters.




Re: This image and the next three

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Quite right, Mike, 1912.  It was the 1892 date on the map that led me astray, that and being up past what apparently is my bedtime . . .

 

Schuyler

 

 

Likely there was a fatality, which is why they kept the wrecked wagon there long enough to dispatch a photographer with an 8x10 view camera, likely the next day.

 

And I don't mean to embarrass Schuyler, but this photo is from 1912. The "boxcars" on the siding are actually ice cars, which were insulated and had plug doors, most of which were built for ice service and not intended or marked for interchange. The Pocono Mountains had many lakes and ice harvesters.

 

The photo is at Plymouth is on the "Bloom," the line between Scranton and Northumberland that passed through Bloomsburg that was very coal laden near Scranton end.  That's the Parrish Breaker in the distance that straddles the main line.

 

           ....Mike Del Vecchio



-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 21, 2015 3:44 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] This image and the next three

 


flat tire, circa 1892


Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.
 
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg
 
Schuyler


Re: This image and the next three

MDelvec952
 



Likely there was a fatality, which is why they kept the wrecked wagon there long enough to dispatch a photographer with an 8x10 view camera, likely the next day.

And I don't mean to embarrass Schuyler, but this photo is from 1912. The "boxcars" on the siding are actually ice cars, which were insulated and had plug doors, most of which were built for ice service and not intended or marked for interchange. The Pocono Mountains had many lakes and ice harvesters.

The photo is at Plymouth is on the "Bloom," the line between Scranton and Northumberland that passed through Bloomsburg that was very coal laden near Scranton end.  That's the Parrish Breaker in the distance that straddles the main line.

           ....Mike Del Vecchio



-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Jun 21, 2015 3:44 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] This image and the next three

 

flat tire, circa 1892



Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.
 
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg
 
Schuyler


Re: This image and the next three

Charles Peck
 

I find the group of three insulated box cars interesting.  All in rough shape as in "not suitable for interchange"
but then likely only in local use anyway.  No poling pockets although I understand poling was common
in that era.  The center car of the three has a truss rod loose and perhaps the queenpost missing.  Certainly
sagging for lack of attention.  I suppose wooden cars of the era did require a lot more attention from the
car shops than the later steel cars. 
The canvas(?) above and below the doors are interesting features. Extra padding to better seal the doors
against sags and twists? 
Certainly an era that would be very interesting to model if I knew more about it all.
Chuck Peck (so very grateful for modern air conditioning in Florida) 

On Sat, Jun 20, 2015 at 11:02 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.

 

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg

 

Schuyler



Re: This image and the next three

Tim O'Connor
 


flat tire, circa 1892



Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.
 
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg
 
Schuyler


Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

Robert kirkham
 

Speaking of ladders and tools, for the origami brass ladders used in Yarmouth kits, I’ve used a scrap piece of styrene cut to a squared letter C shape.  Along the top and bottom of the C, I super-glue grab irons so the wire mounting arms are sticking up from the jig.   The wire arms provides 4 mounting points for the two ladder stiles, and makes it easy to glue the remaining rungs into place while keeping the ladder square.   One they are complete, the ladder is removed from the jig and the top and bottom rungs can be added.
 
 
 
Rob Kirkham 
 
 
 

Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2015 4:23 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders
 


The technique works with notebook paper or any other set of parallel lines as long as they are spaced closer than your desired spacing.  You don't even need a ruler!  Just transfer the distance between the top and bottom to your cardstock, then place one mark on the first line, and swing the other till it is on the seventh line (or six or five for fewer rungs).  Mark the intersections on your template and you have your rung spacing.  If you really want it to the gnats a.., pick the distance off the model with locking dividers, swing those to the number of desired rungs, then butt your template edge against the dividers and mark or draw a line on the parallel lines and reset the dividers to the interval along the line.  What you are doing is using the equal interval of the parallel lines to divide the uneven distance.  It's a slick trick you can use for all sorts of evenly spaced layout tasks like gondola ribs, panel seams, window mullions, etc.

John
 
John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights

707-490-9696

PO Box 44736
Washington, DC 20026-4736
 

From: "'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC]"
To: Steam Era Freight Cars
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2015 3:26 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders
 
 
Bill's explanation was hard for me to follow, and I know the trick. I'll try to explain it by example.
 
I took an HO boxcar off my layout and, using a ruler, measured a side ladder. The top rung is 1-9/32". or 1.28125" from the bottom rung, center to center. There are 7 rungs in the ladder. 7 rungs means 6 spaces between rungs. The spacing between rung works out to .2135", an inconvenient measurement! 
 
For this to work, you want to use a measurement that is less than the total (1.28125''). 6 times 3/16" equals 1.125", a lesser number.
 
Now, Take a piece of paper and draw 7 parallel lines, 3/16" apart. Take a piece of cardstock, and make a pair of small marks 1-9/32" apart along one edge. Align the bottom  mark on the cardstock, with the bottom-most line.Rotate the card so that the top mark lines up with the top line. This is where the angle comes in. Now all the other lines can be marked on the card, and they will be evenly spaced.

This is easier to do, than explain. Try it with my numbers, then you'll grasp the concept. 
 
Scott Haycock
 



 
 
OK, I’m always grateful to learn new tricks, but this one I do not follow.  Bill - what is the advantage you are gaining with the diagonal lines?  I do not see how drawing equally spaced marks on the diagonals is easier than doing so on the vertical line?  Clearly I’m missing something.  Can you explain.
 
Rob Kirkham
 
 
 



Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the explanation Scott (and Greg Kennelly of list).  
 
Rob Kirkham    
 

Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2015 12:26 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders
 


Bill's explanation was hard for me to follow, and I know the trick. I'll try to explain it by example.
 
I took an HO boxcar off my layout and, using a ruler, measured a side ladder. The top rung is 1-9/32". or 1.28125" from the bottom rung, center to center. There are 7 rungs in the ladder. 7 rungs means 6 spaces between rungs. The spacing between rung works out to .2135", an inconvenient measurement! 
 
For this to work, you want to use a measurement that is less than the total (1.28125''). 6 times 3/16" equals 1.125", a lesser number.
 
Now, Take a piece of paper and draw 7 parallel lines, 3/16" apart. Take a piece of cardstock, and make a pair of small marks 1-9/32" apart along one edge. Align the bottom  mark on the cardstock, with the bottom-most line.Rotate the card so that the top mark lines up with the top line. This is where the angle comes in. Now all the other lines can be marked on the card, and they will be evenly spaced.

This is easier to do, than explain. Try it with my numbers, then you'll grasp the concept. 
 
Scott Haycock
 

 

 

OK, I’m always grateful to learn new tricks, but this one I do not follow.  Bill - what is the advantage you are gaining with the diagonal lines?  I do not see how drawing equally spaced marks on the diagonals is easier than doing so on the vertical line?  Clearly I’m missing something.  Can you explain.
 
Rob Kirkham
 

 

 


SAL B-7 Underframe Help Needed

Bill Welch
 

The instructions with Sunshine #55.8 for a Seaboard B-7 Round Roof Boxcar would have us build the car with the same Underframe as the SAL's Round Roof DD AF-1 class, their #55.7. I don't think this is correct as the B-7 was essentially an ARA 1932 car with a different roof (and ends).


I think the Underframe should look like those on the 1932, 1937, and 1942 cars. Can SAL folks help me understand if I am correct or not, please? Thank you!


Bill Welch

 


Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

John Barry
 

The technique works with notebook paper or any other set of parallel lines as long as they are spaced closer than your desired spacing.  You don't even need a ruler!  Just transfer the distance between the top and bottom to your cardstock, then place one mark on the first line, and swing the other till it is on the seventh line (or six or five for fewer rungs).  Mark the intersections on your template and you have your rung spacing.  If you really want it to the gnats a.., pick the distance off the model with locking dividers, swing those to the number of desired rungs, then butt your template edge against the dividers and mark or draw a line on the parallel lines and reset the dividers to the interval along the line.  What you are doing is using the equal interval of the parallel lines to divide the uneven distance.  It's a slick trick you can use for all sorts of evenly spaced layout tasks like gondola ribs, panel seams, window mullions, etc.

John
 
John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights

707-490-9696

PO Box 44736
Washington, DC 20026-4736


From: "'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC]"
To: Steam Era Freight Cars
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2015 3:26 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

 
Bill's explanation was hard for me to follow, and I know the trick. I'll try to explain it by example.

I took an HO boxcar off my layout and, using a ruler, measured a side ladder. The top rung is 1-9/32". or 1.28125" from the bottom rung, center to center. There are 7 rungs in the ladder. 7 rungs means 6 spaces between rungs. The spacing between rung works out to .2135", an inconvenient measurement!  

For this to work, you want to use a measurement that is less than the total (1.28125''). 6 times 3/16" equals 1.125", a lesser number.

Now, Take a piece of paper and draw 7 parallel lines, 3/16" apart. Take a piece of cardstock, and make a pair of small marks 1-9/32" apart along one edge. Align the bottom  mark on the cardstock, with the bottom-most line.Rotate the card so that the top mark lines up with the top line. This is where the angle comes in. Now all the other lines can be marked on the card, and they will be evenly spaced.

This is easier to do, than explain. Try it with my numbers, then you'll grasp the concept.  

Scott Haycock




 

OK, I’m always grateful to learn new tricks, but this one I do not follow.  Bill - what is the advantage you are gaining with the diagonal lines?  I do not see how drawing equally spaced marks on the diagonals is easier than doing so on the vertical line?  Clearly I’m missing something.  Can you explain.
 
Rob Kirkham 






Re: Determining Rung Spacing When Scratch Building Ladders

Scott H. Haycock
 

Bill's explanation was hard for me to follow, and I know the trick. I'll try to explain it by example.

I took an HO boxcar off my layout and, using a ruler, measured a side ladder. The top rung is 1-9/32". or 1.28125" from the bottom rung, center to center. There are 7 rungs in the ladder. 7 rungs means 6 spaces between rungs. The spacing between rung works out to .2135", an inconvenient measurement!  

For this to work, you want to use a measurement that is less than the total (1.28125''). 6 times 3/16" equals 1.125", a lesser number.

Now, Take a piece of paper and draw 7 parallel lines, 3/16" apart. Take a piece of cardstock, and make a pair of small marks 1-9/32" apart along one edge. Align the bottom  mark on the cardstock, with the bottom-most line.Rotate the card so that the top mark lines up with the top line. This is where the angle comes in. Now all the other lines can be marked on the card, and they will be evenly spaced.

This is easier to do, than explain. Try it with my numbers, then you'll grasp the concept.  

Scott Haycock


 


OK, I’m always grateful to learn new tricks, but this one I do not follow.  Bill - what is the advantage you are gaining with the diagonal lines?  I do not see how drawing equally spaced marks on the diagonals is easier than doing so on the vertical line?  Clearly I’m missing something.  Can you explain.
 
Rob Kirkham 



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