Date   

Re: prototype for Pemco 53-foot flatcar?

Tony Thompson
 

Ben Hom wrote:

"It would be nice to find a prototype for the Tyco car as I have several of them in a box somewhere."
While this prototype is available from SPH&TS/Intermountain, Bruce Petty uses the Tyco cars as an inexpensive stand-in for SP Class F-70-7:http://www.lariverrailroads.com/flatcar.html


    But keep in mind that the very accurate Red Caboose flat car is a GOOD model of that SP car class. The RC dies are now owned by, and used for production by, the Southern Pacific Historical & Technical Society.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /PEMCO 50 ft Flat Car - AHM-RoCo 53 ft Flat Car.pdf
Uploaded by : benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@att.net>
Description : Side-by-side model comparison of the PEMCO 50 ft flat car and AHM/RoCo 54 ft flat car.


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/PEMCO%2050%20ft%20Flat%20Car%20-%20AHM-RoCo%2053%20ft%20Flat%20Car.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@att.net>


Re: prototype for Pemco 53-foot flatcar?

Benjamin Hom
 

Richard Townshend wrote:
"Assuming the Pemco car is the same as the Roco/AHM car (and I almost certain they are the car), there is another difference as well. The former is a scale 54' long while the Tyco car is just shy of 50'. Close examination of the cars shows a lot of commonalities, so it appears one was derived from the other, but I have no idea which came first (though I suspect the Roco car was the original)."
As you pointed out, different lengths, so not the same car even though the Pemco model may be derived from the AHM/RoCo model.  See the attached side-by-side (also uploaded to the files section).

"It would be nice to find a prototype for the Tyco car as I have several of them in a box somewhere."
While this prototype is available from SPH&TS/Intermountain, Bruce Petty uses the Tyco cars as an inexpensive stand-in for SP Class F-70-7:http://www.lariverrailroads.com/flatcar.html

Ben Hom
 



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: prototype for Pemco 53-foot flatcar?

Richard Townsend
 

Assuming the Pemco car is the same as the Roco/AHM car (and I almost certain they are the car), there is another difference as well. The former is a scale 54' long while the Tyco car is just shy of 50'. Close examination of the cars shows a lot of commonalities, so it appears one was derived from the other, but I have no idea which came first (though I suspect the Roco car was the original).
 
It would be nice to find a prototype for the Tyco car as I have several of them in a box somewhere.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Jul 4, 2015 4:14 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: prototype for Pemco 53-foot flatcar?

 


Tod C. Dwyer asked:"Maybe I'm wrong, but isn't this the same flat car as Tyco put out? It looks about identical. Or is one a "copy cat" of the other? Either way, I've always liked the die work on both."

Close, but not the same.  See the attached comparison (also uploaded to the group Files section).

Ben Hom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: prototype for Pemco 53-foot flatcar?

Riverboy
 

Thanks Ben.

I didn't realize the differing number of stake pockets. They are actually both really nice starting points for a decent model. I like the fine rivet detail on them. Other than the molded on steps, there really isn't anything "chunky" on either one.

Tod C Dwyer (Ohio)



On Saturday, July 4, 2015 7:14 AM, "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 


Tod C. Dwyer asked:"Maybe I'm wrong, but isn't this the same flat car as Tyco put out? It looks about identical. Or is one a "copy cat" of the other? Either way, I've always liked the die work on both."

Close, but not the same.  See the attached comparison (also uploaded to the group Files section).

Ben Hom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /PEMCO - TYCO 50 ft Flat Car.pdf
Uploaded by : benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@att.net>
Description : Side-by-side comparison of PEMCO and TYCO HO scale 50 ft flat cars.


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/PEMCO%20-%20TYCO%2050%20ft%20Flat%20Car.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@att.net>


Re: prototype for Pemco 53-foot flatcar?

Benjamin Hom
 

Tod C. Dwyer asked:"Maybe I'm wrong, but isn't this the same flat car as Tyco put out? It looks about identical. Or is one a "copy cat" of the other? Either way, I've always liked the die work on both."

Close, but not the same.  See the attached comparison (also uploaded to the group Files section).

Ben Hom


Re: "Dauphin" trucks...

Misc Clark
 

yep - Dolphin trucks - they're under some PRR tenders...
Clark Cone

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 1:47 PM, Charles Peck lnnrr152@gmail.com [STMFC] <
STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Bowser offered Dolphin tender trucks. I think they were under some Bowser
PRR tenders.
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 1:08 PM, Jeff Ford sectioncar@gmail.com [STMFC] <
STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Group,

From the "Needle in a Haystack" Department:

Has anyone ever heard of Dauphin trucks? Are any photos available? I
get the impression that they may be for heavy duty service. To clarify,
they are two-axle trucks. The earliest Helium tank cars (3 large
tanks) rode on such trucks.

Thank you,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Triple Valve Questions

Dave Nelson
 

I have two questions for the pro’s:

 

 

Assume some level of brake set is in place and so the brake cylinder has positive air pressure… the Engineer  moves the brake handle from Lap to release and in a couple of moments the triple valve senses the situation, changes valve positions, and the brake cylinder vents to the atmosphere.

 

(1)    How instantaneous is that venting? Is it really instantly to atmospheric pressure (e.g., like a balloon popping)… or does it take a couple of seconds (e.g., more like a leak)  If like a leak,  how many PSI/second?

(2)    Before that venting occurs, does the trainline air pressure have to equal or exceed that in the air reservoir or does it let go when it gets within a couple of PSI (e.g., 95% or something like that) or a couple of PSI over?

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Broadway ltd announces 6,000 gallon ACF type 27 tank car

Steve SANDIFER
 

Send photos like that to Matt. He is always looking for good documentation and wants to please. 

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ

Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 3:42 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Broadway ltd announces 6,000 gallon ACF type 27 tank car

 

 

 
Ethyl seems like a really good choice -- there's a photo of EBAX 628 in
the Sept 2004 Railmodel Journal, and the cars were painted in a light
gray
color scheme from the 1930's to the 1950's. I have color scans of them
in
at least 4 different schemes from the 1950's to 1990's.
 
Tim O'Connor
 
 
 
Those went in the catalog too
soon.  We'll get the paint schemes posted as
soon as possible, but it will probably be late July before they are
ready.
What do you want to see on the cars?  What dates are you looking
for? 
Sincerely,
Matt Williamson
 
 


For Sale: OMI HO scale brass 6-wheel Buckeye Trucks

Rob Sarberenyi
 

Cleaning through my project and parts collection I came across three pairs of
Overland Models (OMI) HO scale brass 6-wheel Buckeye Tender Trucks with plain
bearing journals. Trucks are fully sprung and equalized, with nickel silver
wheels and insulated axles. Price is $25.00 a pair plus mailing cost.

http://www.pbase.com/espeef5/image/160628686
http://www.pbase.com/espeef5/image/160628688
http://www.pbase.com/espeef5/image/160628690

The trucks are also useful under many heavy duty flatcars, along with other
pieces of rolling stock fitted with 6-wheel Buckeye style trucks. Buy all three
sets and I'll pay shipping within the USA. I accept PayPal.

Interested? Please contact me directly off-list: espeef5 at Comcast dot net

Thanks!

Rob Sarberenyi


Re: General tank car discussion (UNCLASSIFIED)

Tangent Scale Models
 

---In STMFC@..., <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote :

"Models in HO include LifeLike/Walthers P2K Type 21's, Intermountain Type 27's, and Red Caboose post-war welded 103, plus the drop-dead gorgeous Tangent 6k 3-compartment "Type 30" General American car. That car pretty much puts all others to shame. You also need these cars even if you don't think so. Probably more than one. 3-compartment cars were not only used to ship different commodities (like say weights of oil, lubricants), but also were used in shipping crankcase oil to loco facilities in many locations, where the two outside compartments contained "new" oil, and the return ride hosted "used" oil in the center compartment, for recycling."

Thank you Elden for the great writeup!  Also, thanks for the kind comments on the Tangent 3-compartment 6,000 gallon tank car.  For anyone looking for those, we will have a new production later this summer, and there are some cool schemes to look forward to.  Specifics to come later when they are available.

I also wanted to point out that Tangent has another very "STMFC relevant" tank car besides the 6,000 gallon car you referred to above.  That is the GA 8000 gallon acid welded tank, which sits on the welded underframe design that premiered during WWII and lasted into the 1960s, with a minor bolster variation in 1951.  Tangent offers both versions.  The specific acid tank Tangent offers for that welded underframe was first produced by GA in 1949.  Tangent currently offers kits and undec RTR black cars, as well as RTR painted cars in 4 schemes, highlighted here.  http://www.tangentscalemodels.com/general-american-8000-gallon-acid-welded-tank-car/

 

Thanks again Elden.

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models


Re: New Walther's cars?

midrly
 

The Walthers CN car has the wrong ends and the wrong doors.

CN cars had a truncated top rib on IDE ends.

Door panels were rivetted in the valleys, not on the ridges.

Car number is correct for Swain series 27, CN 524500-526199 built 10/47 to 1/48, built by Eastern Car, but built date is wrong.

Use of stock number font and dimensional data is wrong.

Car colour is too dark to represent CN Red #11.  Inexcusable when the CN Lines Historical Society will supply colour info to any manufacturer that wants it, for free.  

And then there are those moulded-on grabirons and ladders...Ugh!

Steve Lucas.


Re: General tank car discussion (UNCLASSIFIED)

Mark Hemphill
 

Thank you!  You increased my tank car knowledge by 99% (I set a low bar).

Mark Hemphill


Re: General tank car discussion (UNCLASSIFIED)

Stuart Forsyth
 

Nah.  It’s at least Tank Cars 201.  Outstanding work!

Best wishes,


Stuart A. Forsyth



On Jul 2, 2015, at 6:08 PM, 'Claus Schlund HGM' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi Elden and List Members,

Thanks for the excellent write-up - I feel like I just attended a class - "Tank Cars 101".

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "'Gatwood, Elden SAW' elden.j.gatwood@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: <STMFC@...>; <bbfcl@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2015 12:50 PM
Subject: [STMFC] General tank car discussion (UNCLASSIFIED)

> Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
> Caveats: NONE
>
> Hey groups;
>
> I have been asked by a couple individuals to put some of the info I put together out there to group members, and maybe save you 
> some time in your fleet development. Also, to keep this discussion going. And maybe fill in some info to those for whom this is an 
> introduction. I was helped out with many details by Richard Hendrickson, on the pre-1949 fleet, although my interests and 
> research went into the sixties and beyond.
>
> First, I agree with all the follow-on discussion RE: location, location, location; era, era, era. Everything about what you 
> looked at depended on where and when you looked. I will not talk much to pre-WW I, so here goes...
>
> Here are the generalities (let's not squabble over "exactitude" here, this is just meant to frame the tank car discussion):
>
> Cars built to ARA 1917 are labeled (for example) "ARA III" (note the "three" carries over below). This is stenciled in small 
> letters on the right end of each side of the tank for those class III cars built under ARA oversight.
>
> In 1927, the ICC takes over tank car specs and transforms ARA III into Class "ICC-103". Ditto on the stencils.
>
> Tank capacities (gallons) are generally stenciled on the end of the tank. Multi-compartment cars generally got stencils for each 
> compartment on the sides of the domes. "Capacity" refers to weight, not volume.
>
> In this early era, insulated cars, which are developing, become ARA IV, then "ICC-104"
>
> Insulated high-pressure tanks then become "ICC-105"
>
> ICC-106 are multi-tank removable high-pressure tank... cars.
>
> Suffixes to the above refer to welded ("W"), Nickle ("N"), etc.
>
> You also have ARA "Types":
> TA - Acid Car
> TG - Glass-Lined
> TL - Lined (other than glass) [mostly rubber or nickel linings in early periods]
> TM - Conventional
> TMU - Multiple Unit Tank
> TP - High-Pressure
> TR - Aluminum Tank
> TW - Wooden Tank
>
> So, let's start with the most common tank car in most folks' time of interest:
>
> Riveted (ICC-103), or Welded (103-W)
> Insulated or Non-Insulated
> General Service - Oil, Caustic Soda
> 2% Dome
> 2 Valves + Vent
>
> This is the car you see everywhere. They hauled most everything that wouldn't eat through the tank. These include the "Van Dyke" 
> (As an ARA III, it really was a 103) Type X, "Type 11", "Type 21", "Type 27" (AC&F designs by year of design), numerous GATC 
> classes, the very numerous UTLX "X3" (103), and many cars built by minority and absorbed builders like PTCC, STCC, NACC, and 
> others. Builders were also stenciled on the tank. Tanks didn't always end up on the as-built underframe...
>
> The tanks themselves evolved greatly. Early cars had radial courses, where the joint/rivet lines run around the tank. These gave 
> way to 4-course longitudinal sheets, then by the Type 27, to 3-course longitudinal sheets, then post-war, welded tanks. Insulated 
> cars disguised the tank, and came in many "courses" that had only to do with the jacketing. Hold-downs/tank bands varied greatly 
> over time, and by builder. These are often a give-away as to builder and timeframe.
>
> AC&F underframes are generally recognized by their "stub" sill construction, which does not run the length of the running boards, 
> but ends at the bolsters. Early ones have riveted components, late ones are welded. GATC had a different sill arrangement with 
> no significant thicker end sill, but a bolster extension that included an ovaloid pocket, and double stirrup steps as an ID hint. 
> This changed later. NATX bought many cars from AC&F. UTLX had their own very unique designs, that included an ACF-like sill, but 
> in the time of the X-3's, had an extended end sill arrangement with wooden decks beyond the end of the tank, poling pockets, and 
> other unique UTLX details, like having the commodity boards and defect boards mounted on square steel panels. Many UTLX cars also 
> had an arrangement of the triple valve above the air reservoir, on one side of the car. Some had a single ladder and dome 
> platform on only one side. These four owner/sometimes builder (AC&F built cars that their lessor SHPX leased) had the vast 
> majority of cars in this era under their control.
>
> Dome vents & valves also evolved over time. Early cars like the Type 11 had vents on elbows off the sides of the dome, later ones 
> almost always utilized the dome top. Dome sizes were supposed to be 2% of the capacity of the tank, for 103's but in some early 
> cases, were much larger. This seems to have been customer-specified, and not a general application. No 103 I have ever seen had 
> a dome smaller than 2% in the timeframe we are interested in.
>
> 103's generally (all) had a bottom outlet/clean-out, and this is also a give-away when confused.
>
> Models in HO include LifeLike/Walthers P2K Type 21's, Intermountain Type 27's, and Red Caboose post-war welded 103, plus the 
> drop-dead gorgeous Tangent 6k 3-compartment "Type 30" General American car. That car pretty much puts all others to shame. You 
> also need these cars even if you don't think so. Probably more than one. 3-compartment cars were not only used to ship different 
> commodities (like say weights of oil, lubricants), but also were used in shipping crankcase oil to loco facilities in many 
> locations, where the two outside compartments contained "new" oil, and the return ride hosted "used" oil in the center 
> compartment, for recycling.
>
> There have been a limited number of brass cars, most from Overland, including an ACF insulated 103 without platforms, an ACF 
> insulated with platforms, a GATC insulated car, a UTLX 10k Type X-3, and an odd insulated 103 with platforms and a kind of stepped 
> railing around the dome only found on one or two lessees cars, like Schenectady and Wyandotte. Then, there are some brass cars 
> that are just wrong.
>
> There are also some really nice resin car offerings, like those from Southern Car, the challenging OOP Sunshine fleet, and 
> including a Type 11, and the very odd 20k ARA III 3-compartment coal tar car bought by J&L Steel, offered by Funaro & Camerlengo. 
> A number of folks on this list have built them, so ask away.
>
>
> This should get a few of you started. There are literally hundreds of photos to look at on-line. If you are interested in the 
> topic, start looking. The Fallen Flags site is a great start.
>
> I hope everyone has a great 4th, and if any of you are interested in continuing with additional classes and such, let me know.
>
> Elden Gatwood
>
> Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
> Caveats: NONE
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: "Gatwood, Elden SAW" <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
> ------------------------------------
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>
> 



Blackstone UTLX Narrow Frame & Frameless tank cars

Robert kirkham
 

Just wondering: has anyone taken apart either of these models with a view to converting them to standard gauge?  Any comments on how they came apart or pitfalls in the conversion process?
 
Rob Kirkham


Re: General tank car discussion (UNCLASSIFIED)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Elden and List Members,

Thanks for the excellent write-up - I feel like I just attended a class - "Tank Cars 101".

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "'Gatwood, Elden SAW' elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>; <bbfcl@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2015 12:50 PM
Subject: [STMFC] General tank car discussion (UNCLASSIFIED)


Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Hey groups;

I have been asked by a couple individuals to put some of the info I put together out there to group members, and maybe save you some time in your fleet development. Also, to keep this discussion going. And maybe fill in some info to those for whom this is an introduction. I was helped out with many details by Richard Hendrickson, on the pre-1949 fleet, although my interests and research went into the sixties and beyond.

First, I agree with all the follow-on discussion RE: location, location, location; era, era, era. Everything about what you looked at depended on where and when you looked. I will not talk much to pre-WW I, so here goes...

Here are the generalities (let's not squabble over "exactitude" here, this is just meant to frame the tank car discussion):

Cars built to ARA 1917 are labeled (for example) "ARA III" (note the "three" carries over below). This is stenciled in small letters on the right end of each side of the tank for those class III cars built under ARA oversight.

In 1927, the ICC takes over tank car specs and transforms ARA III into Class "ICC-103". Ditto on the stencils.

Tank capacities (gallons) are generally stenciled on the end of the tank. Multi-compartment cars generally got stencils for each compartment on the sides of the domes. "Capacity" refers to weight, not volume.

In this early era, insulated cars, which are developing, become ARA IV, then "ICC-104"

Insulated high-pressure tanks then become "ICC-105"

ICC-106 are multi-tank removable high-pressure tank... cars.

Suffixes to the above refer to welded ("W"), Nickle ("N"), etc.

You also have ARA "Types":
TA - Acid Car
TG - Glass-Lined
TL - Lined (other than glass) [mostly rubber or nickel linings in early periods]
TM - Conventional
TMU - Multiple Unit Tank
TP - High-Pressure
TR - Aluminum Tank
TW - Wooden Tank

So, let's start with the most common tank car in most folks' time of interest:

Riveted (ICC-103), or Welded (103-W)
Insulated or Non-Insulated
General Service - Oil, Caustic Soda
2% Dome
2 Valves + Vent

This is the car you see everywhere. They hauled most everything that wouldn't eat through the tank. These include the "Van Dyke" (As an ARA III, it really was a 103) Type X, "Type 11", "Type 21", "Type 27" (AC&F designs by year of design), numerous GATC classes, the very numerous UTLX "X3" (103), and many cars built by minority and absorbed builders like PTCC, STCC, NACC, and others. Builders were also stenciled on the tank. Tanks didn't always end up on the as-built underframe...

The tanks themselves evolved greatly. Early cars had radial courses, where the joint/rivet lines run around the tank. These gave way to 4-course longitudinal sheets, then by the Type 27, to 3-course longitudinal sheets, then post-war, welded tanks. Insulated cars disguised the tank, and came in many "courses" that had only to do with the jacketing. Hold-downs/tank bands varied greatly over time, and by builder. These are often a give-away as to builder and timeframe.

AC&F underframes are generally recognized by their "stub" sill construction, which does not run the length of the running boards, but ends at the bolsters. Early ones have riveted components, late ones are welded. GATC had a different sill arrangement with no significant thicker end sill, but a bolster extension that included an ovaloid pocket, and double stirrup steps as an ID hint. This changed later. NATX bought many cars from AC&F. UTLX had their own very unique designs, that included an ACF-like sill, but in the time of the X-3's, had an extended end sill arrangement with wooden decks beyond the end of the tank, poling pockets, and other unique UTLX details, like having the commodity boards and defect boards mounted on square steel panels. Many UTLX cars also had an arrangement of the triple valve above the air reservoir, on one side of the car. Some had a single ladder and dome platform on only one side. These four owner/sometimes builder (AC&F built cars that their lessor SHPX leased) had the vast majority of cars in this era under their control.

Dome vents & valves also evolved over time. Early cars like the Type 11 had vents on elbows off the sides of the dome, later ones almost always utilized the dome top. Dome sizes were supposed to be 2% of the capacity of the tank, for 103's but in some early cases, were much larger. This seems to have been customer-specified, and not a general application. No 103 I have ever seen had a dome smaller than 2% in the timeframe we are interested in.

103's generally (all) had a bottom outlet/clean-out, and this is also a give-away when confused.

Models in HO include LifeLike/Walthers P2K Type 21's, Intermountain Type 27's, and Red Caboose post-war welded 103, plus the drop-dead gorgeous Tangent 6k 3-compartment "Type 30" General American car. That car pretty much puts all others to shame. You also need these cars even if you don't think so. Probably more than one. 3-compartment cars were not only used to ship different commodities (like say weights of oil, lubricants), but also were used in shipping crankcase oil to loco facilities in many locations, where the two outside compartments contained "new" oil, and the return ride hosted "used" oil in the center compartment, for recycling.

There have been a limited number of brass cars, most from Overland, including an ACF insulated 103 without platforms, an ACF insulated with platforms, a GATC insulated car, a UTLX 10k Type X-3, and an odd insulated 103 with platforms and a kind of stepped railing around the dome only found on one or two lessees cars, like Schenectady and Wyandotte. Then, there are some brass cars that are just wrong.

There are also some really nice resin car offerings, like those from Southern Car, the challenging OOP Sunshine fleet, and including a Type 11, and the very odd 20k ARA III 3-compartment coal tar car bought by J&L Steel, offered by Funaro & Camerlengo. A number of folks on this list have built them, so ask away.


This should get a few of you started. There are literally hundreds of photos to look at on-line. If you are interested in the topic, start looking. The Fallen Flags site is a great start.

I hope everyone has a great 4th, and if any of you are interested in continuing with additional classes and such, let me know.

Elden Gatwood

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Gatwood, Elden SAW" <Elden.J.Gatwood@usace.army.mil>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links




Re: New Walther's cars?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Ed’s research is available to all of us at

 

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/PullmanStandard40ftPS1boxcars.xls .

 

Thanks Ed!

 

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2015 3:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Walther's cars?

 


On Jul 2, 2015, at 4:52 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

No photos, so who knows what it will look like, or what road names they will

offer. Correct road names could be ATSF, CGW, CMO, C&O, KCS, LSBC, LV, MEC,

MSC, NH? (not sure about NH, since they also had 10'0" cars), NYC, P&WV, RI,

SAL, UP.

Tim and Jeff,
And some of the above PS-1 box cars had Pullman welded roofs, which had distinctively different seam caps.
Regard,
Ed Hawkins


Re: GATX 56608

Jack Mullen
 

Ian,

Thanks very much for your detailed response. I'm afraid that the purpose of the huge dome will remain unknown, unless someone gets lucky and finds an article about them in the trade press. I've tried searching RME 1921 and '22, without result.  

I found that PTL published a book titled "The Tank Car" in 1921, which might be helpful, or at least of general interest. I haven't found a copy in either the online secondhand book markets, or as an electronic copy.

Jack Mullen


Landing Ship Trains

Todd Horton
 

Good photos of unloading cars from a ship onto Normandy.



https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/did-you-know-they-landed-train
s-in-normandy-too.html



Todd Horton

Southeast Machine Tool Sales

3123 Maple Rd.

Lindale Ga 30147

678-264-7448 CELL

706-232-7563 FAX

thorton@southeastmachine.co



southeastmachine.co



Buying and selling new, and used machine shop equipment.



logo_s

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