Date   

Re: Dunnage Toolbox?

thmsdmpsy
 

I had thought perhaps a cooper's tool kit but this answer makes more sense to me too.  Tom Dempsey, Spokane, WA


Re: Kadee ACF 11,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car

rwitt_2000
 

It seems like we still need models of smaller capacity tank cars e.g. 6,000-gal to 8,000-gal. at this quality of tooling.

Bob Witt


Re: Dunnage Toolbox?

Patrick Wade
 

From the point on the hammers in the hanging tool box perhaps they are used to break up any large chunks of ice.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 2:02 AM, Barry Bennett barrybennetttoo@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Looks to me more like a workman's toolbox that has been hung by a convenient nail to keep it from being under foot.

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 2:19 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This is link to an undated photo from the Los Angeles Public Library digital archives:

 

http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics28/00063554.jpg

 

It shows a worker top icing head lettuce in a refrigerator car. To the right, hanging on the wall, appears to be a tool box. Would this have been a common item used to secure dunnage and the lining in the refrigerator car?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: Kadee ACF 11,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car

 




---In STMFC@..., <dhc628@...> wrote :

Thought this would have caught someones attention by now.


Jason Cook
New Haven, IN

There is discussion about this car on Atlas Rescue Forum:
http://atlasrescueforum.proboards.com/thread/3868/kadee-announces-gallon-insulated-tank
Since ACF made so many tank cars, it would be a good guess Kadee will come out w/ other reporting marks,
Andy Jackson
Bellflower CA
 


Re: B&O Modeler

Edward
 

Rich Chapin asked:

Last B&O Modeler Issue I downloaded was 2nd Qt 2014, vol 8, #2. Was this the last??

  

Yes, that was the last B&O Modeler issue posted.


Ed Bommer


Re: Kadee ACF 11,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car

Tim O'Connor
 

looks very good. but what's with the miniature photos on Kadee's web site?
isn't it time for Kadee to notice that almost everyone has broadband now?

i'm really not overly excited. yet ANOTHER AC&F tank car, and moreover one
that is nearly identical to the Atlas model (albeit of higher quality).

Tim O'

http://www.kadee.com/ca/tank/tank.htm


Re: B&O Modeler

RICH CHAPIN
 

Last B&O Modeler Issue I downloaded was 2nd Qt 2014, vol 8, #2. Was this the last??

 

And yes Tim,  Mr. Sherman would be proud of your Wayback. Thx

 

Rich Chapin

 


Re: B&O Modeler

Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...>
 

I last checked the B&O Modeler site a month ago (I check all the similar sites once a month) and downloaded the TWO  issues (2014-Q1 and 2014-Q2) I hadn’t got.

 

Shame it’s on hiatus and I hope it returns. I find all the society Modeler magazines very useful.

 

Regards,

________________________________________

Alan Monk

London, UK

 

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Re: Dunnage Toolbox?

Barry Bennett
 

Looks to me more like a workman's toolbox that has been hung by a convenient nail to keep it from being under foot.

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 2:19 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This is link to an undated photo from the Los Angeles Public Library digital archives:

 

http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics28/00063554.jpg

 

It shows a worker top icing head lettuce in a refrigerator car. To the right, hanging on the wall, appears to be a tool box. Would this have been a common item used to secure dunnage and the lining in the refrigerator car?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Re: NYC train consists

Scott H. Haycock
 

Thanks,Guy.

Since my modeling era is more recent than Terry's documentation, I'm working backwards from the most recent (1948) consist lists. As I work backwards, I'll keep my eye out for these rule changes.  



Scott Haycock


 

Scott wrote:
 
"Something I've noticed as I go through these consists is, every box car listed as "merchandise" has a 10 ton load weight. Considering that almost all of the other box cars have a more specific description of their lading, would it be safe to assume that these cars carry l.c.l. loads? Is the 10 ton listing just a shortcut to actually weighing these cars, as the nature of l.c.l. would almost never approach the load limit of the car?"
 
 
The minimum weight a car could transport in LCL service was controlled by the Office of Defense Transportation beginning with the issuance of General Order ODT No. 1 on May 1, 1942.  Between May 1 and July 1, 1942, the minimum was specified as 6 tons.  From July 1 to September 1, 1942, the minimum was increased to 8 tons.  From September 1, 1942, the minimum was increased to 10 tons continuing (as such) thru the duration of the ODT.
 
Exceptions to the provisions of GO ODT No. 1 were issued as General Permits.  The exceptions included; cars loaded with merchandise consigned to the Military (7 ton minimum), Westbound reefers returning to specific states (5 ton minimum), and box cars routed towards grain producing territories (5 ton minimum).  
 
There are examples of these exceptions within Terry's consists as well as cars carrying less tonnage prior to the May 1, 1942 Order.  
 
Regards,
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada 
 



Re: NYC train consists

Guy Wilber
 

Scott wrote:
 
"Something I've noticed as I go through these consists is, every box car listed as "merchandise" has a 10 ton load weight. Considering that almost all of the other box cars have a more specific description of their lading, would it be safe to assume that these cars carry l.c.l. loads? Is the 10 ton listing just a shortcut to actually weighing these cars, as the nature of l.c.l. would almost never approach the load limit of the car?"
 
 
The minimum weight a car could transport in LCL service was controlled by the Office of Defense Transportation beginning with the issuance of General Order ODT No. 1 on May 1, 1942.  Between May 1 and July 1, 1942, the minimum was specified as 6 tons.  From July 1 to September 1, 1942, the minimum was increased to 8 tons.  From September 1, 1942, the minimum was increased to 10 tons continuing (as such) thru the duration of the ODT.
 
Exceptions to the provisions of GO ODT No. 1 were issued as General Permits.  The exceptions included; cars loaded with merchandise consigned to the Military (7 ton minimum), Westbound reefers returning to specific states (5 ton minimum), and box cars routed towards grain producing territories (5 ton minimum).  
 
There are examples of these exceptions within Terry's consists as well as cars carrying less tonnage prior to the May 1, 1942 Order.  
 
Regards,
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada 
 


Griffin Wheel Co.

Don Strack
 

While compiling some history about the Griffin Wheel iron wheel plant in Salt Lake City (1927-1960), I was able to borrow a copy of the book "Griffin Wheel Company, The First Hundred Years, 1877-1977" by way of interlibrary loan. Its a nice book, and includes a milestone timeline of the development of the iron railroad wheel, and Griffin's development of the cast steel railroad wheel that replaced the iron type.


I have created a web page to capture the history of the Salt Lake City plant, and the plain text of the book itself, which includes numerous photos. The book is a generic corporate history, with lots of white space and modern graphic design. It is printed on rough-finish cream-colored paper, so the photos do not scan very well, but I was able to capture the text, which is very good reading.


I leave it to someone who knows much more about railroad wheels to make comments about the accuracy of the book's text, and Griffin's place in the history of railroad wheels.


http://www.utahrails.net/industries/griffin-wheel.php


Don Strack



Re: Southern Boxcar Herald Laments

Bill Welch
 

Speedwitch does a comprehensive set of Southern decals that includes the Aluminum version of the Southern herald.

Bill Welch


Re: Southern Boxcar Herald Laments

Tony Thompson
 

Garth Groff wrote:

 

On thing stood out right away to me. The herald on 10048 built in 1938 and photographed in 1945 (page [33]) is quite different from the others. The slogan "The Southern serves the South" is of a large style and nearly fills the entire space between the two rings. The slogans on 22423 on the same page, 27000 (page [34]) and 30579 (page [35]) are in much smaller style and do not fill the rings. 30579 was built in 1951/52 and appears in original paint. 27000 was repainted circa 1958. Another car, 330219, a 1946-built car shown in 1953 also has the smaller lettering.


     Garth, I touched on this in my column in _Model Railroad Hobbyist_ for March 2015, which included a prewar and a postwar Southern box car. The herald changed very noticeably, as you say, in 1945.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Dunnage Toolbox?

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This is link to an undated photo from the Los Angeles Public Library digital archives:

 

http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics28/00063554.jpg

 

It shows a worker top icing head lettuce in a refrigerator car. To the right, hanging on the wall, appears to be a tool box. Would this have been a common item used to secure dunnage and the lining in the refrigerator car?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Kadee ACF 11,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car

Jason C
 

Thought this would have caught someones attention by now.





Jason Cook
New Haven, IN


Southern Boxcar Herald Laments

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

I picked up copy of Jim Kincaid's SOUTHERN RAILWAY COLOR GUIDE at the Virginia Museum of Transportation this morning. I went to Roanoke to see the Y-6a which is on loan from St. Louis. Impressive. Very hard to photograph with their narrow grounds. Rods all missing. But back to the book. I was pleased to see that there were a number of 1950s-era cars shown.

On thing stood out right away to me. The herald on 10048 built in 1938 and photographed in 1945 (page [33]) is quite different from the others. The slogan "The Southern serves the South" is of a large style and nearly fills the entire space between the two rings. The slogans on 22423 on the same page, 27000 (page [34]) and 30579 (page [35]) are in much smaller style and do not fill the rings. 30579 was built in 1951/52 and appears in original paint. 27000 was repainted circa 1958. Another car, 330219, a 1946-built car shown in 1953 also has the smaller lettering.

I just checked my dwindling stock of Champ decals, and all that I have of the large size are the older type shown on 10048 measure 5' across. I do have one pair of a 4' herald with the smaller slogan, maker unknown.

I have a pair of unbuilt 50' P2K auto cars, both with a "New 1944" date. One has a 4' 3" herald with the smaller lettering. The second has a 5' herald with the slogan filling the ring, but lettering style doesn't look like 10048. Oh, poop!

Where can I get the more modern herald decals? When did the heralds change? And how large (always 5'?) were these on boxcars ? Inquiring minds want to know.

Maybe I shouldn't have bought the book. But then the prototype police would eventually have noticed. But now I know the 50' PS-1 I lettered up a few years ago is WRONG!

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 7/17/15 11:21 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Garth Groff wrote

   Do you know if Erie 87000-87499 built in 1957 by GATC had unpainted galvanized roofs?
   And the running boards? Ed Hawkins' July 1999 RMJ general article on the late 40' boxcars
   offered no paint information on this series.


Photos appear to show unpainted galvanized roofs with painted seam caps.
The ends were black, and the portion of the running board that overhangs
the end appears to have received black paint but the rest of the rb looks
unpainted (on a lateral rb seen from below)

Tim O'Connor



Re: B&O Modeler

rwitt_2000
 

The last one to work for me is Feb 17, 2013.

This link will get you the last issues published except for a single one done in 2014.

On the left side of the web page in "Magazine Footnotes" frame is a link to the last updated version of the "B&O Modeler Index", which has nine (9) pages.

Between the first link, Feb 20, 2006, and last link, Feb 17, 2013, it looks like one can access all the B&O Modelers from vol. 3 through vol. 7.

I hope this helps.

Bob Witt

P. S. A big THANK YOU to Tim O' for reminding us about the "WAYBACK machine".


Re: Covered Hopper - Westvaco Chemical Division

Dave Nelson
 

There are two different Westvaco’s out there.  One is (was?) the West Virginia Pulp & Paper Company.  The other is the Westvaco mine in Wyoming, eventually owned by FMC.  The covered hoppers under discussion were for the later business.

 

Perhaps this is one of those rare cases where the specified markets were so different an identical name was allowed to be Trademarked.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 11:35 AM
To: Steam Era Frt Car Group
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Covered Hopper - Westvaco Chemical Division

 




Would these cars be present at the Westvaco Paper Pulp Mills in Virginia?

Al Kresse

 


Re: Covered Hopper - Westvaco Chemical Division

Ed Hawkins
 


On Jul 20, 2015, at 1:15 PM, Ed Hawkins hawk0621@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I covered all of these cars in RP CYC Volume 27. Per the caption on page 92, SHPX 25472 was one of 45 cars in series 25433-25477 built in 1948 and leased to the Kimberly-Clark Corporation (photo of SHPX 24448 shown as an example). 

Bob,
Sorry for a typo and extra message, but to correct the error the Kimberly Clark photo is SHPX 25448.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

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