Date   

Re: Painting Turntable

Dennis Storzek
 

When I was doing a lot more painting than I've done in recent years, I found the most versatile painting fixture was my left hand; fully articulated angle adjustment, the only downside was the inability to rotate the model a complete 180 degrees without putting it down... and if I was going to drop the model, dollars to donuts it would happen while I was putting it down. My solution was to cut myself several different length pieces of 1x2 and 1x3 lumber, and drill a pair of dowel holes in the ends on a standard pattern. I bought a plastic Rubbermaid "lazy susan", and attached a block to the top that had a pair of matching dowels.

To use this kit I'd find a stick that was a nice fit inside the model body and pack it in place with chunks of foam rubber. Floors and other flat things got stuck to it with double faced foam tape. I then had a handle I could hold to manipulate the model for painting, and a place I knew I could park it without having it topple over when I needed that hand free. It was parked on a turntable, so I could spin it around before picking it up again without danger of having it fall in the dist on the bottom of the spray booth. I could turn it to any angle to inspect it, and either spray it in place, or pick it up again for better angle.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Painting Turntable

Tony Thompson
 

     As others have said, I too support the model on an old Blue Box, but you know what, I can actually turn the box with my hand! no turntable! been doing that for at least 30 years and plan to continue. 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Painting Turntable

rob.mclear3@...
 

Yeah Bill Tamiya make one for the military and armour guys you might try looking at their website.  I think this is what you are looking for this is on the Amazon UK site but I am sure the local hobby shop can get this for you if they don't stock it already.

Tamiya Spray-Work Painting Stand Set # 74522

 



Rob McLear
Australia.


Re: Painting Turntable

John
 

I use an inexpensive plastic lazy Susan designed to go in a kitchen cabinet to hold tea cups or something like that.  It has two shelves, so with the model on the top shelf it's possible to get the airbrush low enough to get a good angle for spraying perpendicular to a car body.  It's 10" in diameter.

John Bopp
Farmington Hills, MI



On Sep 17, 2015, at 6:55 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.


Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch


Re: Painting Turntable

Dave Owens
 

A buddy uses this one from Tamiya. It's pretty handy and costs about $20.

And http://tamiya.com/english/products/74522stand/

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.


New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
June 3-4, 2016
Enfield, Conn. (New location)
www.neprototypemeet.com
facebook.com/NERPM


Re: Painting Turntable

Bill Baker <bill_baker@...>
 

I use aluminum foil . . . I also made a wooden fixture that fits on the turntable to hold items for painting . . . now in its 30th year!
 
Bill Baker

Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2015 7:48 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting Turntable

<<It is not as friction free or as easy to clean excess paint, but it still works just fine.>>

 

If keeping such a tool clean is a concern to you, use newspaper, paper bags, plastic bags, etc and some painter’s tape to mask off your lazy susan (or for that matter, the interior of your spray booth).  

 

When it gets too messy for your tastes, strip off the masking materials and replace!

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 


Re: Painting Turntable

Steve Haas
 

<<It is not as friction free or as easy to clean excess paint, but it still works just fine.>>

 

If keeping such a tool clean is a concern to you, use newspaper, paper bags, plastic bags, etc and some painter’s tape to mask off your lazy susan (or for that matter, the interior of your spray booth).  

 

When it gets too messy for your tastes, strip off the masking materials and replace!

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 


Re: Painting Turntable

Steve Haas
 

 

Honestly, both work reasonably well. The food version probably cost $5 twenty years ago.  It is not as friction free or as easy to clean excess paint, but it still works just fine.

 

I'd probably recommend the Tamiya by a small margin for convenience over price. 

 


Sent from Dave Bott'
 iPhone


On Sep 17, 2015, at 6:55 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.

 

Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch



Re: Painting Turntable

tyesac@...
 

I've been using a plastic lazy susan bough out of the kitchen gadget / spice storage tray things.   I think is a Rubbermaid product.  Mine has been sitting in the spray booth for decades and still does the trick.  As for propping up the models, I've used old blue box kit boxes.   I suppose I could have added extra hold down fixtures at some point, but haven't needed to.
 
Tom Casey
 
I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.

Anyone, any suggestions?
Bill Welch
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: David Bott dbott@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Sep 17, 2015 9:08 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting Turntable

 
I have two: one is a plain old plastic lazy susan designed for food serving. I added my own foam chunks or cardboard boxes to set models upon.

The other is a Tamiya brand designed for model painting. It came with metal spring clips that can be inserted into holes for multiple configurations. It might have cost $15 plus shipping five or ten years ago, but I didn't pay for it. It was a gift.

Honestly, both work reasonably well. The food version probably cost $5 twenty years ago.  It is not as friction free or as easy to clean excess paint, but it still works just fine.

I'd probably recommend the Tamiya by a small margin for convenience over price. 


Sent from Dave Bott '  iPhone

On Sep 17, 2015, at 6:55 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] < STMFC@...> wrote:

 
I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.

Anyone, any suggestions?
Bill Welch


Re: Painting Turntable

Clark Cooper
 

On Sep 17, 2015, at 5:55 PM, fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com [STMFC] wrote:


I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.



Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch


Re: Painting Turntable

Jim Hayes
 

I have a cheap plastic lazy susan that I've had for years. Look in kitchen stuff. I think that's where I got it.


Jim 

On Thu, Sep 17, 2015 at 3:55 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.


Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch



Re: Painting Turntable

Dan Stainton
 



They're quite common at garage sales.      Dan Stainton 


Re: Painting Turntable

Ed Mims
 

Bill,

I think you can find these at Bed, Bath & Beyond in the kitchen ware section. I saw them there a few years back in about two sizes--8-10 inch dia. and one about 12 inches in diameter. Other kitchen ware places may have them as well. The larger one would work well. I have often thought about buying one--just never have.

I believe they are called Lazy Susans.

Ed Mims
Jacksonville, FL


Re: Painting Turntable

Charles Peck
 

Rubber Maid makes one and Ace Hardware offers a couple of sizes of lazy susan
bearings so you can put your chosen size of platform on it. 
Chuck Peck

On Thu, Sep 17, 2015 at 6:55 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.


Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch



Re: Painting Turntable

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I have two: one is a plain old plastic lazy susan designed for food serving. I added my own foam chunks or cardboard boxes to set models upon.

The other is a Tamiya brand designed for model painting. It came with metal spring clips that can be inserted into holes for multiple configurations. It might have cost $15 plus shipping five or ten years ago, but I didn't pay for it. It was a gift.

Honestly, both work reasonably well. The food version probably cost $5 twenty years ago.  It is not as friction free or as easy to clean excess paint, but it still works just fine.

I'd probably recommend the Tamiya by a small margin for convenience over price. 


Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Sep 17, 2015, at 6:55 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.


Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch


Difco Axleless Trucks

gary laakso
 

There is a picture of Difco Axleless Trucks (the side frames hold the stub axles that do not extend to the other side frame) in the Chesapeake & Ohio Freight Cars 1937-1946 book at page 202.  Its unclear to me how the trucks were attached to the under frame because there is no central bolster.   The trucks are under a new, 1937 built caboose.  Were these trucks used on any freight car? 
 
I appreciate the recommendations from the group to purchase the book and I am glad that I purchased a copy. 
 
Gary Laakso
south of Mike Brock


Re: Painting Turntable

MDelvec952
 



How about a lazy susan?

This one: 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Multipurpose-10-Rotating-Turntable-Lazy-Susan-220-lbs-360-Swivel-Home-Kitchen-/301426740816?hash=item462e6f0e50

has grooves that will help hold whatever you're using to suspend the item being painted.  I might try one.

               ....Mike Del Vecchio


-----Original Message-----
From: fgexbill@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Sep 17, 2015 6:55 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Painting Turntable

 
I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.

Anyone, any suggestions?
Bill Welch


Painting Turntable

Bill Welch
 

I have no idea what to call then but I know I have seen Lazy Susan type device that allow a freight car model to be turned and painted. I did checked Sprue Brothers and Micro Mark and did not see anything. I looked under Lazy Susans on Google and Amazon and did not see anything, yet at least, that satisfied me.


Anyone, any suggestions?

Bill Welch


Re: PMcK&Y, CNJ hoppers with 8 ribs's

Benjamin Hom
 

Ed Mines wrote:
"The photo of the PMcK[&]Y hopper I'm looking at is in the 61000 series. It's a 2 bay car. I was surprised to see that they only had 2 series of 2 bay hoppers in the Jan. '43 ORER.

The CNJ hopper is a signature car cap 1888; F&C model.

The pictures are on p139 & 141 of the Kline/Culotta book. Spacing is not exactly the same; I wonder about the rest."

Not close at all.  PMcK&Y 61000-61999, SSC built 1916, Lot 340-H, 30 ft IL, 10 ft 11 in top chord above rail, 1992 cu ft,  clearance diagram shows side dump car though ORER lists cars as HM. 
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-340.jpg 

vs.

CNJ 65500-66633, SSC built 1920, 32 ft IL, 10 ft 8 in top chord above rail, 1888 cu ft.
 
 
Ben Hom


Re: PMcKY, CNJ hoppers with 8 ribs's

ed_mines
 

The photo of the PMcKY hopper I'm looking at is in the 61000 series. It's a 2 bay car. I was surprised to see that they only had 2 series of 2 bay hoppers in the Jan. '43ORER.


The CNJ hopper is a signature car cap 1888; F&C model.


The pictures are on p139 & 141 of the Kline/Culotta book. Spacing is not exactly the same; I wonder about the rest.


Ed Mines

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