Date   

Re: number of cabooses

MDelvec952
 



Generally the number of cabooses was determined by the number of jobs, plus a safety factor for out-of-service and non-revenue cars. When cabooses were required, each job that left yard limits had to have one.  During the 1910-1920-era when roads that operated four-wheel cabooses had to replace them with cabooses of approximate size and weight of a freight car, many roads had a higher number of cabooses in service during the transition. If a railroad had a bunch of branch lines that radiated from various yards, it would need more cabooses than a bridge-line without a lot of local or branch line traffic. My favorite road had 400 miles of main lines and roughly 250 cabooses during the steam era, thanks to its numerous local freights and coal branches.

            ....Mike Del Vecchio  (caretaker of four restored and running, full-size steam-era cabooses)


-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Sep 28, 2015 12:30 pm
Subject: [STMFC] number of cabooses

 
How can the number of cabooses of a railroad be estimated? By the number of freight engines?

If 100 new cabooses were built can it be assumed a like number were retired?

My apologies if this question is beyond the scope of this group.

Ed Mines


Re: Aleene's tacky glue/glue to attach metal roofwalks

Gary Ray
 

Aleene’s Tacky glue does not string like Goo.  It is water based and takes paint OK.  However, I did discover as I was doing some scenery work around a trestle that getting it wet will dissolve it again.  Still my favorite for structures, just keep it dry.

 

Previously made weeds as described in the article.   Glue bases sometimes clumped up when removing them with a putty knife.  Will try suggestion about using silicon spray on pan to alleviate problem.  Also wait 24 hours (instead of my much shorted time) as suggested.  Still, easy to do.  I made hundreds of different sizes and colors and store them by color and shape in cheap plastic containers from the dollar store until I’m ready to scenic an area.

 

Gary Ray

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 9:41 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Aleene's tacky glue/glue to attach metal roofwalks

 




Said glue is mentioned in the grass and weeds article starting on page 64 of the Oct. RMC.

 

Anyone familiar with this glue? Does it string like Goo? Is it solvent or  water based? Take paint OK?

 

Anyone have a bad experience using formula 560 canopy glue to attach photoetched roofwalks to a plastic model?

 

Ed Mines





Re: number of cabooses

Dennis Storzek
 

For layout use, it's pretty simple; you need one per train, plus a couple spares to cover extra trains, work trains, etc.

If you are modeling a crew change point during the days of assigned cabooses, you need two per train plus spares.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Aleene's tacky glue/glue to attach metal roofwalks

Tony Thompson
 

Ed Mines wrote:

 
Anyone have a bad experience using formula 560 canopy glue to attach photoetched roofwalks to a plastic model?

    Never, over many years. It is excellent for the job, as it dries flexible and stays that way, no popping off from thermal expansion and contraction. Doesn't attack plastic in any way. And it works equally well for F-unit etched metal grilles, though of course F units are only of interest here when they pull freight cars.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Which kind of car end is this?

Dave Nelson
 


Re: number of cabooses

Armand Premo
 


    While I tend to agree, model railroads are still models of the real thing varied by the owners' personal preferences.We can not have the same number of cars as the protoype .I have tried to determine the number of cars I have on my roster  based on percentages,by road and  car type appearing on wheel reports and all other available data  .Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] number of cabooses

 

Ed-

I doubt that there is any universal equation that can be developed to determine how many cabooses there should be on a railroad.

There are a number of factors that,  off the top of my head, come to mind and I’m sure the list members can add more:

Traffic Volume

Length of divisions / runs

Assigned cars vs. pooled

Use of cabooses for helper service, work trains

Local traffic vs. overhead

If you are asking to determine how many cabooses your railroad should have  I would turn to the prototype.   If you are modeling a chunk of a real railroad information should be available to guide you for that road.

If you are “protolancing” pick a real road that approximates the one you are creating and use that as a model.  Freight car diagram books usually include cabooses and the indexes show total numbers for each class.

In the case of my favorite road, the Burlington, other than filling in early wreck-destroyed car numbers in the early years (before the turn of the century) most new waycar construction simply added to the pool because of higher traffic volume and expansion of the railroad up to the Depression.   Wood cars were not added after the 1920s and the first small batch of steel cars didn’t appear until 1935.   There was no replacement of wood cars with steel….on the “Q” they retained wood beam trucks under wooden cars (albeit with applied steel underframes) right through the start of the BN.  Some of the wooden cars died of old age (some had original build dates in the 1870s) but there was no wholesale modernization per se.  During both World Wars the CB&Q temporarily converted box cars into waycars, adding end platforms, windows and for the WWI cars cupolas.  The WWI cars were probably scrapped when proper standard waycars were able to be built and the WWII cars went into work service as they were still pretty much boxcars with doors on the sides and a few windows not unlike regular MOW conversions.

Charlie Vlk

_

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4830 / Virus Database: 4365/10705 - Release Date: 09/26/15


Re: Aleene's tacky glue/glue to attach metal roofwalks

Bruce Smith
 

Ed,

Aleene’s Tacky Glue is sort of a souped up version of white glue.  It is water based and definitely not stringy like Goo.  It is rather thick and will dry clear.  I’ve never used it for roof walks

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Sep 28, 2015, at 11:40 AM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Said glue is mentioned in the grass and weeds article starting on page 64 of the Oct. RMC.

Anyone familiar with this glue? Does it string like Goo? Is it solvent or  water based? Take paint OK?

Anyone have a bad experience using formula 560 canopy glue to attach photoetched roofwalks to a plastic model?

Ed Mines


Re: number of cabooses

Charlie Vlk
 

Ed-

I doubt that there is any universal equation that can be developed to determine how many cabooses there should be on a railroad.

There are a number of factors that,  off the top of my head, come to mind and I’m sure the list members can add more:

 

Traffic Volume

Length of divisions / runs

Assigned cars vs. pooled

Use of cabooses for helper service, work trains

Local traffic vs. overhead

 

If you are asking to determine how many cabooses your railroad should have  I would turn to the prototype.   If you are modeling a chunk of a real railroad information should be available to guide you for that road.

If you are “protolancing” pick a real road that approximates the one you are creating and use that as a model.  Freight car diagram books usually include cabooses and the indexes show total numbers for each class.

 

In the case of my favorite road, the Burlington, other than filling in early wreck-destroyed car numbers in the early years (before the turn of the century) most new waycar construction simply added to the pool because of higher traffic volume and expansion of the railroad up to the Depression.   Wood cars were not added after the 1920s and the first small batch of steel cars didn’t appear until 1935.   There was no replacement of wood cars with steel….on the “Q” they retained wood beam trucks under wooden cars (albeit with applied steel underframes) right through the start of the BN.  Some of the wooden cars died of old age (some had original build dates in the 1870s) but there was no wholesale modernization per se.  During both World Wars the CB&Q temporarily converted box cars into waycars, adding end platforms, windows and for the WWI cars cupolas.  The WWI cars were probably scrapped when proper standard waycars were able to be built and the WWII cars went into work service as they were still pretty much boxcars with doors on the sides and a few windows not unlike regular MOW conversions.

 

Charlie Vlk

 

_


Aleene's tacky glue/glue to attach metal roofwalks

ed_mines
 

Said glue is mentioned in the grass and weeds article starting on page 64 of the Oct. RMC.


Anyone familiar with this glue? Does it string like Goo? Is it solvent or  water based? Take paint OK?


Anyone have a bad experience using formula 560 canopy glue to attach photoetched roofwalks to a plastic model?


Ed Mines


number of cabooses

ed_mines
 

How can the number of cabooses of a railroad be estimated? By the number of freight engines?


If 100 new cabooses were built can it be assumed a like number were retired?


My apologies if this question is beyond the scope of this group.


Ed Mines


Writing off old cars was B&O "wagon top" boxcars

Craig Zeni
 

On Sep 26, 2015, at 9:25 PM, STMFC@yahoogroups.com wrote:

5b. Re: B&O "wagon top" boxcars
Posted by: edb8391@cox.net bny1889
Date: Sat Sep 26, 2015 6:25 pm ((PDT))

The Youngstown corrugated doors began to appear on the B&OM-53 class wagon top boxcars around 1953/4.
That coincided with the use of the brighter, oxide red paint replacing B&O's freight car brown. Also at that time the big B&O initials were being used in the car lettering. The expanded metal running boards were installed as the wooden ones required repair or replacement during the 1950s. Not all cars got them. Some rolled on into the 1960s and the banning of Duryea cushion underframes.


M-53 boxcars damaged in derailments off line in the 1960s were written off as losses. There is one at Heavener Oklahoma that became a line side shed beside KCS main line: B&O 380569. I found its number stenciled on the center sill. The only damage I could find was one end of the Duryea underframe carrying the coupler was twisted and its end sill carrier casting was broken. The rest of the car was intact. Rather than pay to have the car loaded on a flat and hauled back to B&O for repair, it was written off on site. Repairs to such under frames was specialized and the Duryea frame would be soon 'outlawed' anyway.
Was this a common practice? There's a MILW ribbed side boxcar on private property at the intersection of US 412 and "Old Hyw 68" east of Siloam Springs, Arkansas... https://goo.gl/maps/tadxcuRmjMp . The herald is still clearly visible (or was a couple of years ago anyway). It's several miles off the KCS thru Siloam Springs but looks quite intact.

Craig Zeni
"Bother..." said Pooh as he chambered another round.


Re: Car Service Rules

earlyrail
 

I know this goes back a couple weeks, but I have been on the road.
I have just posted an Empty Car Request form in the photo section  CarRequest001.jpg

Howard Garner


Re: Vinegar Car?

Armand Premo
 


Oh no,not again.Armand PremoMessage -----

Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2015 9:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Vinegar Car?

 

Are we looking at an end view of a vinegar car on this photo link?

 

http://www.west2k.com/papix/carmanfreight.jpg

 

This image is from the Pennsylvania Railroad Stations Past & Present website at:

 

http://www.west2k.com/pa.htm

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4830 / Virus Database: 4365/10705 - Release Date: 09/26/15


REA BX Boxcar

Bill Lane
 

I am in need of photos of the 8200 series REA cars (converted troop sleepers) in the original REA scheme. (REA diamiond)

 

I am building the car at the top of page 87 (car 8263) in Vic Roseman’s REA book.

 

Photos do not have to be car 8263 but that car in that series in the original REA scheme.

 

Please reply directly to bill@... with any photos you have.

 

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy, PRSL  & Reading in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls 

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
http://www.prrths.com
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
http://www.prslhs.com

 


Gondola internal sides

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Hi guys
When gondolas were shopped did interiors get a coat of paint or were they just painted on the external surfaces.

Thanks in advance
 Paul Doggett UK.




Sent from Samsung mobile

"Eric Hansmann eric@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I would say yes it is. The reporting marks are FTCX. Isn't that Fleischmann's

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

On Sep 27, 2015, at 7:24 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Are we looking at an end view of a vinegar car on this photo link?

 

http://www.west2k.com/papix/carmanfreight.jpg

 

This image is from the Pennsylvania Railroad Stations Past & Present website at:

 

http://www.west2k.com/pa.htm

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Vinegar Car?

paul.doggett2472@...
 

It certainly looks like a vinegar tank car.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"Eric Hansmann eric@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I would say yes it is. The reporting marks are FTCX. Isn't that Fleischmann's

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

On Sep 27, 2015, at 7:24 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Are we looking at an end view of a vinegar car on this photo link?

 

http://www.west2k.com/papix/carmanfreight.jpg

 

This image is from the Pennsylvania Railroad Stations Past & Present website at:

 

http://www.west2k.com/pa.htm

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


WP kits wanted

Fred Jansz
 

Hi all,

Building my WP 1:87 fleet.
I'm still searching for these Sunshine WP kits:
- 59.1 WP dble sheated 16001-18500 series Murphy ends
- 59.2 WP dble sheated 16001-18500 series Dreadnaught ends
- 64.16 WP 14000 series rebuilt Murphy ends
- 64.18 WP 14000 series rebuilt Hutchins ends
(all white lettering).
If you're considering to let these go, please let me know. Thanks!

Always interested in IM PFE R-40-10 reefers (1940's lettering), kit or built.

best regards,
Fred Jansz
PS: I have a postal address in the USA.



Re: Milw 40' rib sided boxcar

mark <caboose9792@...>
 

If none of those options suit you, there is a fullsize example at irm. www.irm.org you can always mesure the car but if roof dementions are important advance arangements are required becuse of the 600 v overhead wire.

mark Rickert
caboose9792@...


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC]
To: Steam Era Freight Cars <STMFC@...>
Sent: 27-Sep-2015 11:03:44 +0000
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Milw 40' rib sided boxcar

 

As I said before, These cars are covered in RPC 13, including several drawings. That volume is still available here: http://rpcycpub.com/ 


Scott Haycock



On Sep 26, 2015, at 5:40 PM, Kevin Sprayberry csxt5555@... [STMFC] wrote:

I'm searching for drawings for these cars. I checked with the historical society and they don't have them on file. Really looking for ends and roof drawings so I can make a pattern. Thanks

Kevin,
If you're looking for railroad drawings of the car, try the Milwaukee Public Library. This institution received a lot of material from the railroad.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: House car structure

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Tim wrote:

Chuck's explanation was better -- I'd forgotten about the draft
(longitudinal)
forces on the center sill.

And Tony responded:

But in fact there ARE longitudinal forces in railroad bridges, as a
train enters, though admittedly not the primary force on the structure.



Tony



Yes, especially if/when the train is either accelerating (which involves
forces from the locomotive only) or braking (which causes forces from every
wheel that passes over the bridge while braking). These forces are not just
incidental, and must be considered in the design of the bridge.



Schuyler


Re: Vinegar Car?

Brad Smith
 

That most likely is a vinegar car. I can't read the reporting marks accurately.   But the Ordinance Department also had these wood tank cars. 

Brad Smith 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Sep 27, 2015, at 8:24 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Are we looking at an end view of a vinegar car on this photo link?

 

http://www.west2k.com/papix/carmanfreight.jpg

 

This image is from the Pennsylvania Railroad Stations Past & Present website at:

 

http://www.west2k.com/pa.htm

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

52041 - 52060 of 189612