Date   

Re: CNW SS box car data

Tony Thompson
 

Lester Breuer wrote:

 
When doing some research for a model project I was reading Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 1, compiled by Ted Culotta, page 52 on Chicago & North Western single-sheathed box cars.   Here he states, " these cars were different from the USRA cars through the use of the ARA 1922 center sill."    I looked in the 1922 and 1925 Car Builders Cyclopedia in the freight car construction sections on underframes and could not find any reference to an ARA center sill.  Based on the photo on page 52, I can see it was a straight sill.  I am asking if someone can point to a photo or diagram of an underframe with  the USRA 1922 center sill Ted is referring to.


      The 1928 Cyc shows both the 1922 and 1924 ARA underframe designs. I included the latter photo in my Volume 4 on box cars, in the _Southern Pacific Freight Cars_ series. 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Small Paint Jars

Tim O'Connor
 


I have bunches of empty jars but the lids (specifically the liners) are
what wear out and stop working -- those 27 cent replacement lids look like
just the ticket!

Tim O'



Thanks Bill, Great find, Guess I will get an order going.

Rich Christie


On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 6:23 AM, "Rich C rhcdmc@... [STMFC]" wrote:

 
Bill, Is the jar top the same as the Floquil/Testors jars that fit most airbrushes?

Rich Christie


CNW SS box car data

frograbbit602
 

When doing some research for a model project I was reading Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 1, compiled by Ted Culotta, page 52 on Chicago & North Western single-sheathed box cars.   Here he states, " these cars were different from the USRA cars through the use of the ARA 1922 center sill."    I looked in the 1922 and 1925 Car Builders Cyclopedia in the freight car construction sections on underframes and could not find any reference to an ARA center sill.  Based on the photo on page 52, I can see it was a straight sill.  I am asking if someone can point to a photo or diagram of an underframe with  the USRA 1922 center sill Ted is referring to.

Thank You for the time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer



Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars

Dennis Storzek
 

I missed this point in my previous answer...

"Did the construction industry change from needing/wanting dry lumber to green
or did they accept undried lumber because it was being shipped that
way?"

Lumber being shipped to market is by no means "green" lumber. Green lumber can have anywhere from 30% to 200% moisture content... 100% being when all the water chemically bound in the cell walls is present, when first felled, timber will also have additional free water in the cells.

Air drying, by stacking under cover with "stickers" (thin strips of wood to keep the layers separated) will typically take that down to 20%, possibly as low as 12%. This is adequate for lumber to be used for structural purposes.

Kiln drying typically takes this down to the 8-10% range, which is preferred for trim, flooring and millwork. Rule of thumb is wood for these uses should be dried slightly dryer than the environment it will be used in, so it swells slightly and tightens joints, etc. as it comes into equilibrium with its surroundings. Laying flooring, for instance,  that is too dry runs the risk of having it swell and buckle.

There is an interesting chart in the US Forest Service Wood Handbook:
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr190/chapter_04.pdf
That shows the equilibrium moisture content wood will attain when exposed to environments having different relative humidity: at 40% RH at 70 deg.F wood will eventually go to about 6%, while at 70% RH and 70 deg. F wood will eventually come into equilibrium at 12%. which is why doors, drawers, and windows tend to stick and change with the seasons. At 90% RH at 90 deg. F wood will go to 20%, and any effect of kiln drying to a lower moisture content will be lost.

More than you wanted to know, I'm sure.

Dennis Storzek
 


1st Qtr. 2016 NYCentral Modeler is Here!!

Noel Widdifield
 


NYCentral Modeler 1st Qtr. 2016

Click here to read.

https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/nycentralmodeler_2016_1q1.pdf




Start with an article by Lars-Erik Sondenkamp about modeling a town called "New Eastbrook, a Town Along the NYC Mainline'.  Lars-Erik is a NYC fan living in the Netherlands and in this edition he tells us about modeling the NYC in N-scale.

NYCSHS Director, Dave Mackay, writes about how he modified one of The TrainMaster, LLC, Section House kits in "Modeling a Small NYC Freight House'. Dave is the Chair of the NYCSHS Membership Committee and a member of the NYCSHS Modelers Committee.  This is the second article in NYCentral Modeler for Dave.

Dennis Regan & Bob Keeler bring us up to date with their report from the 9th Annual St. Louis Prototype Modelers Meet.  You will see several NYCS models they saw there and here about how the participated again this year.

Bob Shaw returns to tell us about "Building a Simple O-Scale Lift-Out Bridge on his growing O-Scale layout.  Brad Andonian writes about "Pacific Limited O-Scale Boxcars (USRA Variants)" showing us some of his skills in painting and lettering these beautiful O-Scale brass models.

Again in this issue, Seth Lakin continues to show us his modeling of "NYC's 50' PS-1 Boxcars  Lot 136-B" in HO-scale. And finally, Editor, Noel Widdifield, provides his return to HO-scale modeling with "Building an American Model Builders' Big Four Freight House Kit">

Of course, you will also find our regular features: "What's New", "NYCSHS RPO" and "The Observation Car" in this 91 page edition.

And all of the regular features are there again for you to enjoy.

Be sure to tell all of our model railroading friends to join you in downloading the NYCentral Modeler or just enjoy reading it on your screen.

  Click Here to Begin Reading!!!

https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/nycentralmodeler_2016_1q1.pdf



Noel Widdifield

Editor, NYCentral Modeler

NYCBigFour@...



Re: CNJ USRA SS box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

Westerfield makes some great sets for USRA single-sheathed box cars.

 

Here’s a link to their single-sheathed offerings. Pick out the appropriate sets for the USRA cars.

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/index.php?cPath=133_242

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 12:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 




    I envy you Eric.Unfortunately there is a lack of quality decals.I have several kits awaiting proper decals.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----

To: STMFC@...

Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 1:36 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 

I just painted a few Tichy USRA SS cars and I will lean heavily on the RPCyc photos when the decal itch strikes. RPCyc 16 was a HUGE assist when I decaled a half dozen USRA DS cars. My focus is 1926 so I suspect few cars were repainted in six years of service time.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 10:32 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 



Thank you, Eric.  I checked my library, but neglected the RP Cyc, an excellent resource!

 

Dave

 

 

On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 11:19 AM, "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

Dave,

 

Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 17, notes the CNJ cars were rebuilt with Hutchins roofs and 221 cars were in service in July 1951. The volume contains two images of the CNJ USRA SS cars. A builder image of 20029 and an image of CNJ 20370 that has a reweigh date of 5-46. CNJ 20370 has been updated with a replacement Ajax power hand brake but retains the KC brake components and the original roof. The caption notes there were 32 of these CNJ cars by October 1953. Specific car numbers for roof upgrades or the dates of those upgrades are not noted.

 

Lastly, CNJ 20370 has the san-serif CNJ lettering with the Lady Liberty emblem.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto: STMFC@... ]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 8:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 

 

I am building a Westerfield CNJ USRA 40’ SS box car, and have 2 questions that I hope you folks can help with.  I am building the kit to represent a late ‘40’s or early ‘50’s car.  The kit comes with K brake gear, but I would like to know if they were converted to AB brakes.  Also, would the lettering have ever been changed to the Statue of Liberty scheme?  The kit decals are for earlier schemes.  I have not found any photos of these cars.  Thanks for your help.

 

Dave Pfeiffer

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars

Mark Hemphill
 

Jim:

To answer your questions about changes in the lumber industry, I suggest reading Nelson Courtland Brown, Lumber: Manufacturing, Conditioning, Grading, Distribution, and Use, John Wiley & Sons, 1947.  It's available free on-line to read at http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001508348  

In particular, chapters 8, Merchandising, Distribution, and Use, and 9, Shipping and Traffic, have a wealth of information that will help inform the use of rolling stock, origin-destination pairs, traffic and rates, and ladings.  

I should note as a caveat that every time I've referred to Brown in various model railroad and railroad historical forums over the years, it's been strongly disputed.  So, perhaps Brown was completely out to lunch.  But, I like Brown because his information, conclusions, and observations correlates well with my own experience with traffic in my own railroad career, and with my received knowledge of lumber buying practices and use for large-scale commercial construction from working for a father during my teens who built between 200 and 1000 housing units a year.  

One particular thing I pay attention to in Brown, buried in the details, is his observations of the substantial regional variations in the way lumber was manufactured, distributed, purchased, and used in 1947.  Some of that variation has gone away today, but having lived in 14 states now thanks to railroads, and having purchased houses in six of them, I am still amazed how builders in one state do things as a common, best practice that in another state would be considered dead wrong and uninformed.

Mark Hemphill  
 


Re: CNJ USRA SS box cars

armprem
 

    I envy you Eric.Unfortunately there is a lack of quality decals.I have several kits awaiting proper decals.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 1:36 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

I just painted a few Tichy USRA SS cars and I will lean heavily on the RPCyc photos when the decal itch strikes. RPCyc 16 was a HUGE assist when I decaled a half dozen USRA DS cars. My focus is 1926 so I suspect few cars were repainted in six years of service time.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 10:32 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 




Thank you, Eric.  I checked my library, but neglected the RP Cyc, an excellent resource!

 

Dave

 

 

On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 11:19 AM, "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

Dave,

 

Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 17, notes the CNJ cars were rebuilt with Hutchins roofs and 221 cars were in service in July 1951. The volume contains two images of the CNJ USRA SS cars. A builder image of 20029 and an image of CNJ 20370 that has a reweigh date of 5-46. CNJ 20370 has been updated with a replacement Ajax power hand brake but retains the KC brake components and the original roof. The caption notes there were 32 of these CNJ cars by October 1953. Specific car numbers for roof upgrades or the dates of those upgrades are not noted.

 

Lastly, CNJ 20370 has the san-serif CNJ lettering with the Lady Liberty emblem.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto: STMFC@... ]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 8:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 



I am building a Westerfield CNJ USRA 40’ SS box car, and have 2 questions that I hope you folks can help with.  I am building the kit to represent a late ‘40’s or early ‘50’s car.  The kit comes with K brake gear, but I would like to know if they were converted to AB brakes.  Also, would the lettering have ever been changed to the Statue of Liberty scheme?  The kit decals are for earlier schemes.  I have not found any photos of these cars.  Thanks for your help.

 

Dave Pfeiffer

 

 

 


No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4842 / Virus Database: 4477/11235 - Release Date: 12/22/15


Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <jimbetz@...> wrote :

Hi,

Greg's post is interesting - who is the cart and who is the horse.
Did the
construction industry change from needing/wanting dry lumber to green
or did they accept undried lumber because it was being shipped that
way? Or simply because it was cheaper?

==============
My Dad was a carpenter during the years immediately after WWII, and I worked in the trade myself for a number of years...

Through the years covered by this list, most wood structures had plaster interior finish. It's true that drywall (called "plaster board" at the time) was introduced sometime in the WWI era, but its initial use was to replace the wood lath behind the plaster, and most buildings still had a two coat plaster finish about 1/2" thick applied to the gypsum board "rock lath". When this much plaster was used in a building, it introduced one heck of a lot of water, and it took weeks for the buildings to dry out so they could be trimmed. I still remember how cold and damp a building was when the plasterers were working, and it's a wonder those guys didn't all wind up with rheumatism and arthritis; many of them probably did. "Fine" homes were still being plastered in the Chicago area into the early seventies, well past the period of our interest.

With that much moisture in the building for several weeks, the wood structure took up water and reached an equilibrium moisture content not much different from common air dried lumber, so there was not much sense in specifying kiln dried, after all running a  dry kiln was expensive, compared to the sun and wind, which were free. Back in those years kiln drying was reserved for lumber that would become high value products; furniture, cabinets, and doors and sash, where the mill wanted to ensure that the parts they cut would remain about the size they cut them, and not shrink further after assembly.

Dennis Storzek


Re: CNJ USRA SS box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

I just painted a few Tichy USRA SS cars and I will lean heavily on the RPCyc photos when the decal itch strikes. RPCyc 16 was a HUGE assist when I decaled a half dozen USRA DS cars. My focus is 1926 so I suspect few cars were repainted in six years of service time.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 10:32 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 




Thank you, Eric.  I checked my library, but neglected the RP Cyc, an excellent resource!

 

Dave

 

 

On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 11:19 AM, "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

Dave,

 

Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 17, notes the CNJ cars were rebuilt with Hutchins roofs and 221 cars were in service in July 1951. The volume contains two images of the CNJ USRA SS cars. A builder image of 20029 and an image of CNJ 20370 that has a reweigh date of 5-46. CNJ 20370 has been updated with a replacement Ajax power hand brake but retains the KC brake components and the original roof. The caption notes there were 32 of these CNJ cars by October 1953. Specific car numbers for roof upgrades or the dates of those upgrades are not noted.

 

Lastly, CNJ 20370 has the san-serif CNJ lettering with the Lady Liberty emblem.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto: STMFC@... ]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 8:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 



I am building a Westerfield CNJ USRA 40’ SS box car, and have 2 questions that I hope you folks can help with.  I am building the kit to represent a late ‘40’s or early ‘50’s car.  The kit comes with K brake gear, but I would like to know if they were converted to AB brakes.  Also, would the lettering have ever been changed to the Statue of Liberty scheme?  The kit decals are for earlier schemes.  I have not found any photos of these cars.  Thanks for your help.

 

Dave Pfeiffer

 

 

 



Re: CNJ USRA SS box cars

Dave Pfeiffer
 

Thank you, Eric.  I checked my library, but neglected the RP Cyc, an excellent resource!
 
Dave
 


On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 11:19 AM, "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]" wrote:




Dave,
 
Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 17, notes the CNJ cars were rebuilt with Hutchins roofs and 221 cars were in service in July 1951. The volume contains two images of the CNJ USRA SS cars. A builder image of 20029 and an image of CNJ 20370 that has a reweigh date of 5-46. CNJ 20370 has been updated with a replacement Ajax power hand brake but retains the KC brake components and the original roof. The caption notes there were 32 of these CNJ cars by October 1953. Specific car numbers for roof upgrades or the dates of those upgrades are not noted.
 
Lastly, CNJ 20370 has the san-serif CNJ lettering with the Lady Liberty emblem.
 
Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX
 
 
 

From: STMFC@... [mailto: STMFC@... ]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 8:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars
 



I am building a Westerfield CNJ USRA 40’ SS box car, and have 2 questions that I hope you folks can help with.  I am building the kit to represent a late ‘40’s or early ‘50’s car.  The kit comes with K brake gear, but I would like to know if they were converted to AB brakes.  Also, would the lettering have ever been changed to the Statue of Liberty scheme?  The kit decals are for earlier schemes.  I have not found any photos of these cars.  Thanks for your help.
 
Dave Pfeiffer
 





Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars

mwbauers
 

For this…..

I would consider using a solid color wood-tone card-stock sourced from the craft world. 

Print a wood grain on the top boards leaving the basic color alone, and stack the card stock as a hollow cored block with some randomness to the ‘board’ ends to be the stack[s] of lumber.
 
Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Dec 22, 2015, at 10:12 AM, jimbetz wrote:


A how to question - I've often been less than satisfied with the texture
of strip wood ... it just seems 'too rough'. Do you think that using strip
wood for lumber loads in gons and on flat cars "works"?
- Jim


Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars

Greg Martin
 

Hi Jim,
 
Let me answer this in context so we all can get a clearer understanding as you have addresses several subjects that seem to blend but might not:
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
Jim Betz writes:

Hi,

Greg's post is interesting - who is the cart and who is the horse.
The cart is the dollar and the horse is the industry.

Did the construction industry change from needing/wanting dry lumber to green or did they accept undried lumber because it was being shipped that way? Or simply because it was cheaper?
 
First I am glad you called it "dried" lumber as the industry during our modeling period cared little if it was kiln dried or air dried, it was the moisture content the consumer was searching for, typically for framing 19% or less. However; most framing lumber was not dried at all as it wasn't necessary and lumber would dry in place and most contractors knew this. Timbers (members 6"x 6" and larger) were seldom if ever dried to 19%. post and beams (4"x 4" and larger) were seldom dried with regards to west coast species, souther species were different most all southern species were dried.
 
Shipping cost were less for dry lumber as the board footage went up on the same car.
 
The market determined the price of lumber so on any given day green was generally cheaper than dry but that could quickly change, need was need and you are pricing your product based on demand and need to move product to generate cash.
 
 I do know that people comment on the changes in the 'quality' of the wood used in home construction over the years ...
 
Well, there were standards set for lumber and panel by both the American and Canadian grading agencies to meet a set of engineering specs for all lumber and panel with many design factors we won't go into. Just know that the old growth timber wasn't going to last forever and so might go some of the aesthetic quality of lumber. No need for full sawn clear Douglas Fir floor joist you will never see. You didn't build with rough cut lumber unless it was sized to a common dimension.   

This also explains why so many of the pics I saw (later on) were clearly lumber that was not "rough cut" ... just because it has been thru the planer doesn't mean it has also been kiln-dried.
 
This is true green lumber was easier on a planner than dried lumber. Also when you see a "donkey mill" in the forest this was to create blanks not consumer lumber, it still went through a saw mill and a planner mill. 
 
A how to question - I've often been less than satisfied with the texture of strip wood ... it just seems 'too rough'. Do you think that using strip wood for lumber loads in gons and on flat cars "works"?
- Jim
Yes, I do as long as you treat it like you would any other model and sand the texture down a bit. I like balsa better than basswood, I don't like either for color except in some cases of white woods such as western hemlock and eastern and western white pine. Southern Yellow Pine has a yellow cast and Douglas Fir a red cast. 
 
Jim Singer has a photo from the WCLIB brochure of a PRR G25 gondola being loaded at what I believe to be Shelton, WA with s load of timber from a jib with three men. 
 
Greg Martin


Re: CNJ USRA SS box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

Dave,

 

Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 17, notes the CNJ cars were rebuilt with Hutchins roofs and 221 cars were in service in July 1951. The volume contains two images of the CNJ USRA SS cars. A builder image of 20029 and an image of CNJ 20370 that has a reweigh date of 5-46. CNJ 20370 has been updated with a replacement Ajax power hand brake but retains the KC brake components and the original roof. The caption notes there were 32 of these CNJ cars by October 1953. Specific car numbers for roof upgrades or the dates of those upgrades are not noted.

 

Lastly, CNJ 20370 has the san-serif CNJ lettering with the Lady Liberty emblem.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2015 8:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] CNJ USRA SS box cars

 




I am building a Westerfield CNJ USRA 40’ SS box car, and have 2 questions that I hope you folks can help with.  I am building the kit to represent a late ‘40’s or early ‘50’s car.  The kit comes with K brake gear, but I would like to know if they were converted to AB brakes.  Also, would the lettering have ever been changed to the Statue of Liberty scheme?  The kit decals are for earlier schemes.  I have not found any photos of these cars.  Thanks for your help.

 

Dave Pfeiffer

 


Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

Greg's post is interesting - who is the cart and who is the horse. Did the
construction industry change from needing/wanting dry lumber to green
or did they accept undried lumber because it was being shipped that
way? Or simply because it was cheaper? I do know that people comment
on the changes in the 'quality' of the wood used in home construction
over the years ...

This also explains why so many of the pics I saw (later on) were clearly
lumber that was not "rough cut" ... just because it has been thru the
planer doesn't mean it has also been kiln-dried.

A how to question - I've often been less than satisfied with the texture
of strip wood ... it just seems 'too rough'. Do you think that using strip
wood for lumber loads in gons and on flat cars "works"?
- Jim

P.S. Clearly the siding at the mill has to have more box cars than flats.


CNJ USRA SS box cars

Dave Pfeiffer
 

I am building a Westerfield CNJ USRA 40’ SS box car, and have 2 questions that I hope you folks can help with.  I am building the kit to represent a late ‘40’s or early ‘50’s car.  The kit comes with K brake gear, but I would like to know if they were converted to AB brakes.  Also, would the lettering have ever been changed to the Statue of Liberty scheme?  The kit decals are for earlier schemes.  I have not found any photos of these cars.  Thanks for your help.

 

Dave Pfeiffer

 


Re: Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars L...

Cyril Durrenberger
 

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 12/21/15, tgregmrtn@aol.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

One thing to consider is that during the earlier days most lumber was dried or seasoned outside for a long period before shipped. So except for the finished lumber the grade of the unfinishedy lumber would not be changed by shipping on a flat car.

Cyril Durrenberger

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Lumber Loads in 1947, 1952, and 1957 - Changes in Types of Cars L...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, December 21, 2015, 11:53 PM


 












Tim,
 
You might think in terms of "finished grades"
and construction grades of
lumber. I mentioned  earlier that "finished grades:
were more of
precision kiln dried mouldings, profiles and siding, but it
included flooring,
stair treads and the like. This would always be shipped in
boxcars regardless.


When you are thinking of building
material grades of lumber most kiln
dried or air dried material was shipped in boxcars, but
un-seasoned or "green"
lumber would ship exposed. The weather would have little or
no impacted on
the grade only appearance. The grade in all cases was
established at the end of
the green chain at the sort and didn't change once the
grader left his stamp.

 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and
a river runs through
it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 12/20/2015 2:43:51 P.M. Pacific
Standard Time,
STMFC@yahoogroups.com writes:
Is
there any information available regarding the DISTANCE
travelled by open cars
vs closed cars with lumber? Most open loads back then
appear to be unwrapped
lumber and I'm guessing many grades of lumber would
not do well if exposed to
rain for long cross-country trips that could easily (and
typically) take 10
days or more. Or is that not true, was rain not
a factor?

Tim
O'Connor









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Re: Request for dates of proto meets, historical society events, other scale modeling-related events

Charlie Duckworth
 

Dave here's the information on the MPHS
Name of event Missouri Pacific Historical Society Annual Meeting
Date and times October 6-9, 2016
Location Jefferson City, Missouri
VERY short description:  Historical presentations, modeling clinics, swap meet and annual meeting 
Cost - I'll know this as hotel arrangements are finalized but one should check the web site below for updates
Contact information marketing@...
web site if any 2016 Jefferson City, MO - On the Ready Track

 


Charlie Duckworth


Re: Small Paint Jars

Rich C
 

Thanks Bill, Great find, Guess I will get an order going.

Rich Christie


On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 6:23 AM, "Rich C rhcdmc@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Bill, Is the jar top the same as the Floquil/Testors jars that fit most airbrushes?

Rich Christie


On Sunday, December 20, 2015 4:27 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
A friend just called asking for the paint jar source I have previously noted. He could not find my post. Just in case others need it here it is: : 1/2 oz Clear Glass Round Packer Bottle 28-400 : Glass Packer Bottles
Below the jars you will see a variety of lids. I purchased the white ones with the plastic liner. I think I ordered 6 dozen jars and seven dozen lids. There is a price break on shipping when you order in quantity.

Excellent service. Quality is very high.

Bill Welch

 





Re: Small Paint Jars

Bill Welch
 

Exactly the same Rich.

Bill Welch

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