Date   

Re: Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

Douglas Harding
 

Could the RD have been used to distinguish the reefers from other Santa Fe cars which were often marked SF in conductor books and on switch lists?

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Swayback Reefers

thecitrusbelt@...
 


The image link below is from the Seattle Municipal Archives and shows a string of reefers on Railroad Avenue. The date is July 19, 1917.


 Click on the link below and then click on the link below the image to see the TIF version and better details.

 

http://clerk.seattle.gov/~scripts/nph-brs.exe?s1=railroad&S2=&S3=&l=100&Sect7=THUMBON&Sect6=HITOFF&Sect5=PHOT1&Sect4=AND&Sect3=PLURON&d=PHO2&p=12&u=%2F%7Epublic%2Fphot1.htm&r=1125&f=G

 

Notice the definite sway on the two truss rod reefers. Looks like these cars have seen better days. The remaining four reefers appear to have fishbelly side sills.

 

Seattle Municipal Archives: http://www.seattle.gov/cityarchives/

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


MP blister side gondola

Eric Hansmann
 

We have another look at a resin kit model that was featured a couple of months ago. Bill Pardie sent photos and a description of his Missouri Pacific blister side gondola efforts. We thought it offered an interesting compare and contrast to Bill Welch's work on the same kit. Check out the details on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/another-mp-gondola/

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy


SUNSHINE B50-12A

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Hi Guys
Has anyone got a SUNSHINE B50-12A kit they are prepared to sell me.
please contact off site.
Many thanks Paul Doggett 



Sent from Samsung mobile


Re: Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Several of the retired Santa Fe employees I have interview spoke of SFRD refrigerator cars as “RDs” when discussing the icing, moving, checking, etc. of such cars.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

Tom Vanwormer
 

David and Steve,
The use of the "RD" code for the SFRD was very popular since I found it used on the Colorado Midland in 1917 for the SFRD cars during a month long car study at Basalt CO for the month of May.

Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

'Steve Sandifer' steve.sandifer@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

SFRD 4413, turkeys, New Orleans, RR-34
SFRD 5072, meat, Oakland CA, RR-37
SFRD 20510, turkeys, Seattle, RR-29
SFRD 23411, turkeys, Seattle, RR-04

SFRD 23721, empty, RR-05
SFRD 25776, turkeys, New York City, RR-09
SFRD 35598, turkeys, New York City, RR-32
SFRD 38824, turkeys, Seattle, RR-34

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ

Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2015 12:42 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

 

 

I have a list of refrigerator cars iced by the SP&S Railway in Portland'
Oregon during October 1945.

Among the usual suspects for car owners , I found several cars with
initials "RD".

They are
car numbers, load, destination
23721, empty
35598, turkeys, New York City
5072, meat, Oakland CA
38824, turkeys, Seattle
4413, turkeys, New Orleans
23411, turkeys, Seattle
20510, turkeys, Seattle
25776, turkeys, New York City

I checked a copy of ORER dated January 1942. There is no listing for
"RD" in the front, and I don't believe that "RD" is short for RDG since
they have no refrs. in any of these series. Also, it is not listed at
Nakina.net

Does anyone know what company used the initials "RD"?

Thank you for any assistance.

Best regards,
David Turner
Keeping the S. P. & S. Ry. alive in Santa Rosa, California


Re: Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

Steve SANDIFER
 

SFRD 4413, turkeys, New Orleans, RR-34
SFRD 5072, meat, Oakland CA, RR-37
SFRD 20510, turkeys, Seattle, RR-29
SFRD 23411, turkeys, Seattle, RR-04

SFRD 23721, empty, RR-05
SFRD 25776, turkeys, New York City, RR-09
SFRD 35598, turkeys, New York City, RR-32
SFRD 38824, turkeys, Seattle, RR-34

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ

Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2015 12:42 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

 

 

I have a list of refrigerator cars iced by the SP&S Railway in Portland'
Oregon during October 1945.

Among the usual suspects for car owners , I found several cars with
initials "RD".

They are
car numbers, load, destination
23721, empty
35598, turkeys, New York City
5072, meat, Oakland CA
38824, turkeys, Seattle
4413, turkeys, New Orleans
23411, turkeys, Seattle
20510, turkeys, Seattle
25776, turkeys, New York City

I checked a copy of ORER dated January 1942. There is no listing for
"RD" in the front, and I don't believe that "RD" is short for RDG since
they have no refrs. in any of these series. Also, it is not listed at
Nakina.net

Does anyone know what company used the initials "RD"?

Thank you for any assistance.

Best regards,
David Turner
Keeping the S. P. & S. Ry. alive in Santa Rosa, California


Playing it Forward: Help STILL Needed at Prototype Rails on Saturday. Jan. 9

Bill Welch
 

If you have looked at the Prototype Rails 2016 schedule you will see that there is a "Live Fire" painting activity on Saturday, January 9 beginning at 2:30 PM. I still need TWO more experienced painters to step forward to act as helpers and coaches for this please.


To repeat an earlier message this will be a chance for as many as 48 attendees to experience spraying Modelflex Acrylic paint with one of four internal mix double action airbrushes—Two Badgers, GREX, or Passche. Each person will have about ten minutes to get the feel of one of these airbrushes and paint a freight car body furnished courtesy of Accurail. Badger is furnishing the paint and some other goodies. Four painters will be painting at any one time. Signups for this will begin about 1 PM on Friday, January 8. Some slots will be held out until Saturday morning for those people arriving then.

To make this an optimal experience, I still need two experienced airbrush users to please step forward to help participants so that each painter has a Coach. These coaches will also help me keep the Airbrushes cleaned and supplied with paint. Although ideally these coaches will have experience spraying water based Acrylics, airbrushing with confidence is more important.

This event will conflict with "Shake & Take" although people that want to try spraying Acrylic paint can sign up for one of the early time slots.

If you can help me and more importantly the 48 prospective painters please contact me offline at: fgexbill (at) tampabay.rr.com (you know how to plug in the "@" and take out the spaces to make the address work, right?).

Thank you for your attention!
Bill Welch



Re: Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

Tony Thompson
 

David Turner wrote:

 

I have a list of refrigerator cars iced by the SP&S Railway in Portland'
Oregon during October 1945.

Among the usual suspects for car owners , I found several cars with
initials "RD".

Does anyone know what company used the initials "RD"?


      A common conductor's abbreviation for SFRD.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

al_brown03
 

Is that perhaps a clerk's abbreviation for "SFRD"?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Ice refrigerators lettered "RD"

David Turner
 

I have a list of refrigerator cars iced by the SP&S Railway in Portland' Oregon during October 1945.

Among the usual suspects for car owners , I found several cars with initials "RD".

They are
car numbers, load, destination
23721, empty
35598, turkeys, New York City
5072, meat, Oakland CA
38824, turkeys, Seattle
4413, turkeys, New Orleans
23411, turkeys, Seattle
20510, turkeys, Seattle
25776, turkeys, New York City

I checked a copy of ORER dated January 1942. There is no listing for "RD" in the front, and I don't believe that "RD" is short for RDG since they have no refrs. in any of these series. Also, it is not listed at Nakina.net

Does anyone know what company used the initials "RD"?

Thank you for any assistance.

Best regards,
David Turner
Keeping the S. P. & S. Ry. alive in Santa Rosa, California


Re: What's in a name

richramik@...
 

I would like to thank everyone that replied to my question.  I appreciate your responses.

Happy New Year to All,
Rich Ramik


Re: was: RE: Southern Railway nomenclature

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Ben Lee on the Southern Railway might be a good bet. He is a retired Southern engineer and was friends with Shelby Lowe. He has answered many operating questions on that list. You can join and check the archives.

He explained to me the history of pulpwood racks and other late transition era freight cars on the Southern, so I mention him on list. But he's not a modeler, so you'll have to catch him on another list.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Dec 29, 2015, at 12:27 AM, jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

    What you are running into in your search regarding the nomenclature in the way SR railroad's cars were handled in groups is, what a lot of folks who have gotten together veterans panels for their historical society conventions have already found. 

     If a person completes high school and then hires on to the rails at age 18, in 1955, today they would be 78 (age 18 + 60 years).

    Railroading is a tough life. I am not a railroad vet however have been fortunate to know a few and been more fortunate to befriend some. I have a great amount of respect for these folks. For many, any promotion or move up the ladder meant moving to a new city/state. Tough on wives, tough hours already on marriages, tough on kids who never saw dad half the time anyway. 

For a railroader, age 78 is pretty old.                     However, I wish you luck.           Jim Dick - St. Paul  


was: RE: Southern Railway nomenclature

np328
 

    What you are running into in your search regarding the nomenclature in the way SR railroad's cars were handled in groups is, what a lot of folks who have gotten together veterans panels for their historical society conventions have already found. 

     If a person completes high school and then hires on to the rails at age 18, in 1955, today they would be 78 (age 18 + 60 years).

    Railroading is a tough life. I am not a railroad vet however have been fortunate to know a few and been more fortunate to befriend some. I have a great amount of respect for these folks. For many, any promotion or move up the ladder meant moving to a new city/state. Tough on wives, tough hours already on marriages, tough on kids who never saw dad half the time anyway. 

For a railroader, age 78 is pretty old.                     However, I wish you luck.           Jim Dick - St. Paul  


Re: Southern Railway nomenclature

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Scott, could you contact me off-list?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2015 11:09 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Southern Railway nomenclature


Schuyler Larrabee asked:

> Stretching the topic here a little, though I am asking about FREIGHT
trains . . . ca. 1955. What were Southern Railway local trains called?
DL&W and ERIE local trains were referred to as "Drills," "Roustabouts,"
"Turns" when appropriate, "Runs," and probably a few others. What was the
terminology for the Southern trains. And ditto for a train that might have
run through to a yard on another railroad, if such a train happened.


My time at the Southern came in the '80s, but such trains were called "jobs"
(didn't go far from the originating point), "turns" (went further, often
between yards), and "transfers" (to other roads). That said, the "Center
Road Job" was a turn from Inman Yard in Atlanta to the former CofG Industry
Yard south of town, so there were no firm rules. I gather some of the names
had been around for years.

Hopefully someone, ahem, older can add to or refute my answer for circa
1955.

Scott Chatfield


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Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Southern Railway nomenclature

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks, Scott, helpful and appreciated. But as Scott said, if anyone can
illuminate differences between the 80's and the mid-50s, please do . . .

Schuyler


Schuyler Larrabee asked:

> Stretching the topic here a little, though I am asking about FREIGHT
trains . . . ca. 1955. What were Southern Railway local trains called?
DL&W and ERIE local trains were referred to as "Drills," "Roustabouts,"
"Turns" when appropriate, "Runs," and probably a few others. What was the
terminology for the Southern trains. And ditto for a train that might have
run through to a yard on another railroad, if such a train happened.


My time at the Southern came in the '80s, but such trains were called "jobs"
(didn't go far from the originating point), "turns" (went further, often
between yards), and "transfers" (to other roads). That said, the "Center
Road Job" was a turn from Inman Yard in Atlanta to the former CofG Industry
Yard south of town, so there were no firm rules. I gather some of the names
had been around for years.

Hopefully someone, ahem, older can add to or refute my answer for circa
1955.

Scott Chatfield


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Southern Railway nomenclature

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Schuyler Larrabee asked:

Stretching the topic here a little, though I am asking about FREIGHT
trains . . . ca. 1955. What were Southern Railway local trains called? DL&W and ERIE local trains were referred to as "Drills," "Roustabouts," "Turns" when appropriate, "Runs," and probably a few others. What was the terminology for the Southern trains. And ditto for a train that might have run through to a yard on another railroad, if such a train happened.


My time at the Southern came in the '80s, but such trains were called "jobs" (didn't go far from the originating point), "turns" (went further, often between yards), and "transfers" (to other roads). That said, the "Center Road Job" was a turn from Inman Yard in Atlanta to the former CofG Industry Yard south of town, so there were no firm rules. I gather some of the names had been around for years.

Hopefully someone, ahem, older can add to or refute my answer for circa 1955.

Scott Chatfield


Re: SEEKING PHOTO HELP

al_brown03
 

Apologies: I was sloppy. Of the cars shown in the RP CYC article, one belongs to lot 563-B: NYC S-95499 (later NYC 123499), shown on pp 55-56. The ends are 4/4 Dreadnaught. This lot comprised NYC 94500-95499 (later NYC 122500-123499).

As Tim says, according to the article three lots had these ends: 559-B, 560-B, and 563-B.

AL B.


Re: Pacific Northwest Lumber Traffic

Tim O'Connor
 


Going back over old emails...

I just noticed this comment about 100 car miles per day. That's actually
100% greater than the 1950's average and considerably greater than the average
daily miles per car day for the UP. The Cotton Belt held the title for the
highest miles per car day throughout the 1950's with an average of over 90
miles per car day. These numbers have only improved slightly since the 1920's
for cars in general circulation (not in dedicated or unit train service).

Tim O'Connor

--------------------

Jeff,
For the total lumber hauled by a railroad, you need to total all four columns. So in 1942, UP hauled 3,492,636 tons of lumber in 108,520 carloads. I can not find anything suggesting that there are zeros missing in these totals. While 300 loads a day may not seem like a lot, remember that in this era most freight cars only traveled about 100 miles per day, so there were likely several thousand carloads of
lumber on the UP on any given day. UP's total carloads in 1942 was 1.4M.
Dave Evans


Re: SEEKING PHOTO HELP

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill I think there were at least 3 lot numbers with dreadnaught ends. I have
some info from Jeff English:

USRA-clone all-steel box car 8'7" IH, 4-4 Dreadnaught ends, Youngstown doors
Lot 559-B, built by ACF St Louis plant Lot 494 in 1927 as CCC&StL 49000-49999
and renumbered after 1936 to NYC 121000 - 121999

I'll send you a photo of NYC 123500 from a different NYC lot number. Not the
same car because it has 4/5 ends... :-(

Tim O'Connor

It looks like part of my e-mail disappeared into God knows where. The model is a Broadway Limited NYC early steel boxcar. The car that I have is numbered 122766 with a lot number of 563B. This car has the dreadnaught end. I have found numerous photos of the car with the earlier steel end but none of this particular arrangement. I would like a photo of this particular series in order to check the details before finishing the car.

Bill Pardie

45581 - 45600 of 185219