Date   

Re: FGE reefer 4-16-1948

Tim O'Connor
 


The WIF mechanical reefers 800-849 (?) also appear to have the same
side sheathing and have very odd 4/5/3 Murphy ends. Just Google Images
for "West India Fruit" and those photos will show up immediately.

Tim



Bill,
Is this one?
http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4050#top_display_media

Scott Haycock


 

I have posted queries about the origins of these cars on this list 2-3 time hoping one of the USRA experts might respond since given the 5/5/5 Murphy ends, fishbelly underframe, and Andrews trucks I believe their origins derive from the USRA 40-ton DS boxcar. I speculate that FGE got their hands on a group of the USRA cars at a good price and rebuilt them into reefers.

There were 140 cars in this group. I have a FGE re-builders company photo (8-1937 Indiana Harbor) and an in-service photo is in the Larry Kline-Ted Culotta NMRA post war freight car fleet book. The cars have a Hutchins or Hutchins type roof and the steel sheathing consists of three riveted horizontal panels on each side of the doors. A similar sheathing arrangement was used on 100 ex-PRR R7 reefers rebuilt by FGE about the same time. Here is a link to a photo of one of these:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gostf693q7xi9c1/NH%20I-79%20Ice%20Car%20ex-PRR%20R7%20FGE%20steel%20rebuild.jpg?dl=0

FGE used horizontal sheathing on the 55 new cars they built before WWII, fifty of which carried FDEX reporting marks designating they had FGE's permanent collapsible decking system.

Bill Welch


Re: FGE reefer 4-16-1948

Scott H. Haycock
 

Bill,
Is this one?

Scott Haycock


 

I have posted queries about the origins of these cars on this list 2-3 time hoping one of the USRA experts might respond since given the 5/5/5 Murphy ends, fishbelly underframe, and Andrews trucks I believe their origins derive from the USRA 40-ton DS boxcar. I speculate that FGE got their hands on a group of the USRA cars at a good price and rebuilt them into reefers.


There were 140 cars in this group. I have a FGE re-builders company photo (8-1937 Indiana Harbor) and an in-service photo is in the Larry Kline-Ted Culotta NMRA post war freight car fleet book. The cars have a Hutchins or Hutchins type roof and the steel sheathing consists of three riveted horizontal panels on each side of the doors. A similar sheathing arrangement was used on 100 ex-PRR R7 reefers rebuilt by FGE about the same time. Here is a link to a photo of one of these:


FGE used horizontal sheathing on the 55 new cars they built before WWII, fifty of which carried FDEX reporting marks designating they had FGE's permanent collapsible decking system.

Bill Welch




Re: "Live Fire" Airbrushing Acrylics at Prototype Rails 2016

Bill Welch
 

I am not sure how I would do that Dan. I do plan to share the handouts and presentation once I have finished the run of Prototype meets concluding with Lisle in October.

Bill Welch


Re: What Kind Of Load Is This?

ed_mines
 

There are real nice SE photos on this site.


Ed Mines


Re: What Kind Of Load Is This?

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Yon mean a Calciner like you say 
to small it could be a paper making roller the were geared and in banks of 30-40 depending on what the paper was for. I have seen about 25ft long plus the end gears.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

It's a little small in diameter for this, but it puts me in mind of a cement
kiln rotating tube (not knowing at the moment the proper terminology for
that thing).

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 03, 2016 2:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Kind Of Load Is This?

Sure Bob,

It's a flat car load ;)

In all seriousness, that is a neat load. Doing a little hypothesizing, the
ends clearly need protection, while the center "pipe" portion does not. The
center portion is only supported at the very ends but the tie downs over it
have pieces of wood to prevent the tie downs from contacting the "shaft"....
and that is what I want to call it, a drives shaft of some kind. Simple
pipe joints on the end would not merit protection. Bearings or bearing
surfaces would.

BTW, the flat is PRR class F30 (not F30A), #470113, built in 1929, one of
100. The car was 50' 0" over the strikers with an initial capacity of
140,000 lbs. This car appears to have been upgraded with 2F-F4 trucks
raising its capacity to 190,000 lbs. I wish I could read the stenciling on
the boxed ends of the load!

Interestingly, the next shot in the series shows a PRR R50B express reefer,
likely in the same freight train passing through Louisiana, Missouri.

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

_____

From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of
thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, January 3, 2016 12:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Load Is This?

Can anyone identify what kind of load this is?

<http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4073#top_
display_media>
http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4073#top_d
isplay_media

Thank you.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: "Live Fire" Airbrushing Acrylics at Prototype Rails 2016

Dan L. Merkel <danmerkel@...>
 

Bill,
 
I won’t be able to make the event but your sharing your experiences, results & formulas with the rest of us would certainly be most helpful.
 
dlm
-------------------------------------------------
Dan L. Merkel


Re: What Kind Of Load Is This?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

It's a little small in diameter for this, but it puts me in mind of a cement
kiln rotating tube (not knowing at the moment the proper terminology for
that thing).



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 03, 2016 2:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Kind Of Load Is This?





Sure Bob,


It's a flat car load ;)



In all seriousness, that is a neat load. Doing a little hypothesizing, the
ends clearly need protection, while the center "pipe" portion does not. The
center portion is only supported at the very ends but the tie downs over it
have pieces of wood to prevent the tie downs from contacting the "shaft"....
and that is what I want to call it, a drives shaft of some kind. Simple
pipe joints on the end would not merit protection. Bearings or bearing
surfaces would.



BTW, the flat is PRR class F30 (not F30A), #470113, built in 1929, one of
100. The car was 50' 0" over the strikers with an initial capacity of
140,000 lbs. This car appears to have been upgraded with 2F-F4 trucks
raising its capacity to 190,000 lbs. I wish I could read the stenciling on
the boxed ends of the load!



Interestingly, the next shot in the series shows a PRR R50B express reefer,
likely in the same freight train passing through Louisiana, Missouri.



Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

_____

From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of
thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, January 3, 2016 12:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Load Is This?





Can anyone identify what kind of load this is?




<http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4073#top_
display_media>
http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4073#top_d
isplay_media



Thank you.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: FGE reefer 4-16-1948

Bill Welch
 

I have posted queries about the origins of these cars on this list 2-3 time hoping one of the USRA experts might respond since given the 5/5/5 Murphy ends, fishbelly underframe, and Andrews trucks I believe their origins derive from the USRA 40-ton DS boxcar. I speculate that FGE got their hands on a group of the USRA cars at a good price and rebuilt them into reefers.

There were 140 cars in this group. I have a FGE re-builders company photo (8-1937 Indiana Harbor) and an in-service photo is in the Larry Kline-Ted Culotta NMRA post war freight car fleet book. The cars have a Hutchins or Hutchins type roof and the steel sheathing consists of three riveted horizontal panels on each side of the doors. A similar sheathing arrangement was used on 100 ex-PRR R7 reefers rebuilt by FGE about the same time. Here is a link to a photo of one of these:


FGE used horizontal sheathing on the 55 new cars they built before WWII, fifty of which carried FDEX reporting marks designating they had FGE's permanent collapsible decking system.

Bill Welch


Tank car

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

Yes, the idea is to market two resin kits, one of which will make a Tk-G or Tk-H, and the other to make either a Tk-I or Tk-J. Each kit will have a tank with appropriate details and two domes. I intend to do the later versions of the Tk-G and -H, with center tank anchors, rather than as-delivered with head blocks and diagonal tank hold-down straps.

	This from sometime in 2013/4 and I know I have most likely bugged you since (probably often) but any idea if or when this might become a reality?
-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Cocoa - no joy

John Sykes III
 

Decided with the money I spent for Christmas and my temporary 8 x 12 ft layout, that Cocoa was a no go this year.  I'm not too certain of my 2007 Kia being able to make the trip either (a lot of little things have been acting up).


The layout is costing me a lot more than I expected . . . about $500 for materials not including any track, switches, scenery, etc.  The 2" thick blue foam is up to about $48/sheet and clear pine ain't cheap either.  Of course, I am making it hinged so it will raise up like a bascule bridge so I will still be able to fit my car in the garage.  That means that Cocoa will have to wait until 2017.  Sigh!!!


-- John


Re: What Kind Of Load Is This?

Bruce Smith
 

Sure Bob,


It's a flat car load ;)   


In all seriousness, that is a neat load.  Doing a little hypothesizing, the ends clearly need protection, while the center "pipe" portion does not.  The center portion is only supported at the very ends but the tie downs over it have pieces of wood to prevent the tie downs from contacting the "shaft".... and that is what I want to call it, a drives shaft of some kind.  Simple pipe joints on the end would not merit protection.  Bearings or bearing surfaces would. 


BTW, the flat is PRR class F30 (not F30A), #470113, built in 1929, one of 100.  The car was 50' 0" over the strikers with an initial capacity of 140,000 lbs.  This car appears to have been upgraded with 2F-F4 trucks raising its capacity to 190,000 lbs.  I wish I could read the stenciling on the boxed ends of the load!


Interestingly, the next shot in the series shows a PRR R50B express reefer, likely in the same freight train passing through Louisiana, Missouri.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 3, 2016 12:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Load Is This?
 


Can anyone identify what kind of load this is?

 

http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4073#top_display_media

 

Thank you.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




What Kind Of Load Is This?

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Can anyone identify what kind of load this is?

 

http://transport.castlegraphics.com/displayimage.php?album=96&pid=4073#top_display_media

 

Thank you.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: northeastern scale...............

 

I stopped by Northeastern Scale Models in Methuen in November as per usual on my trips to MA. The retail store was gone. But, the scale lumber company is still taking phone orders from the on-line catalogue. Former store manager Wayne purchased the Scale Models retail store inventory and it selling the items on eBay.

Jack Dziadul

Sanford, NC


Re: Ice refrigerators, Early 40-foot Mechs

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Welch wrote:

 

I suspect Dennis has the correct answer to John King's question. BTW this car was renumbered to 111 at some point. FGE built only 10 more Thermo-King equipped cars as their gasoline fueled engines proved unpopular in interchange service. Today of course Thermo-King rules on trucks and rail cars.


     PFE experiment3ed with end-mount refrigeration units, applied to ice-car bodies, in 1960 and 1962, five different mechanical arrangements in five different cars, using Trane, Carrier, York and Thermo-King refrigeration. Although plans were made to convert 500 cars, that program was never carried out. In 1965, two of the experimental cars received new Thermo-King and Transicold units, but the entire experiment was terminated in 1968  (see the PFE book for photos and more details).
      All that, of course, lies somewhere in the misty future of this list.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Ice refrigerators (Frozen Turkeys) Early 40-foot Mechs

Bill Welch
 

I suspect Dennis has the correct answer to John King's question. BTW this car was renumbered to 111 at some point. FGE built only 10 more Thermo-King equipped cars as their gasoline fueled engines proved unpopular in interchange service. Today of course Thermo-King rules on trucks and rail cars.

Bill Welch 


Re: Ice refrigerators (Frozen Turkeys) Early 40-foot Mechs

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <e27ca@...> wrote :

Or. . .???

=======

To impress the viewers of the photo. Looks like a PR photo of the new mechanical reefer equipment, then the photo doesn't look any different than a normal reefer... So...

Dennis Storzek


Re: Ice refrigerators (Frozen Turkeys) Early 40-foot Mechs

John King
 

Bill,

Part of the end panel is raised and it looks like the mechanical unit is moved partially out for some purpose. Do you know of this was done for: Better cooling while loading?  To put the car on outside power while loading? Maintenance?  Or. . .???

John King


Re: Photo-etched parts

peteraue
 

Since my name was mentioned several times, I feel I need to speak up.
My recommendation for photo-etching: Do the design and the artwork yourself and find a qualified supplier to do the etching for you. I have been working with such a supplier for a number of years and his technology is vastly superior to what you can do yourself. It may take a bit longer to get parts and it may be a bit more expensive but you avoid all the problems of very hazadous chemicals and you can get parts that you'd never be able to etch yourself.
My own learning curve was very long and quite expensive with a lot of bad parts, but I am fully responsible for evry one of them. My supplier has yet to make his first mistake.
Peter Aue


String Of Reefers In Seattle

thecitrusbelt@...
 

The image link below is from the Seattle Municipal Archives. It shows a long string of reefers sitting in a yard in that city in 1948. Various roads and companies are represented.

 

Click on the link below and then click on the link below the image to see the TIF version and better details.

 

http://clerk.seattle.gov/~scripts/nph-brs.exe?s1=railroad&S2=&S3=&l=100&Sect7=THUMBON&Sect6=HITOFF&Sect5=PHOT1&Sect4=AND&Sect3=PLURON&d=PHO2&p=24&u=%2F%7Epublic%2Fphot1.htm&r=2385&f=G

 

Note the two PFE refrigerator cars to the left, PFE 47128 and PFE (probably) 52444. This second PFE car (on the far left) is one of the Western Pacific refrigerators operated by PFE under lease from WP, the owner of these cars.

 

Seattle Municipal Archives: http://www.seattle.gov/cityarchives/

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ice refrigerators (Frozen Turkeys) Early 40-foot Mechs

np328
 

From the Aug 21, 1956 AAR monthly report;

 The lines have approx. 70,000 fan equipped, 35,000 heavily insulated, and 2000 mechanical cars in service at the present.

    Bill, even that 2000 strikes me as still a small number compared to the others.    Nice photo, thanks.          

   Looking forward to seeing you at the beach next week                                  Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN
 

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