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Re: Machining car end?

hockenheim68
 

 
Brian,

Glad to see you are still at it. When I've had the time to set it up (an all-nighter for me) I've been using CamBam for my CAM and loading the G-code into DeskCNC for machine control. DeskCNC has its own CAM program but I struggle to use it effectively - or at all. For what I'm trying to do CB is decent.  I use Dassault Systemes Draftsight for 2D CAD and Sketchup for 3D so you can tell what end of the spectrum I'm on. I'm not computer literate so what problems I've had are mostly down to lack of general computing knowledge. CB will do waterline, engraving and imports stl which is what I use for organic shapes coming out of sketchup. In my hands it is also much, much easier to use for general pocketing and contouring than DeskCNC which is the real bonus.  The latest version of CB has 40 free uses so it might be something you can try out. The old free version is buggy on the last computer I used it on (Vista, I think) and the Linux version is above and beyond my present ability to set up and use although I have heard good things from the few I've seen using it.



Andrew Hutchinson
Surrey BC Canada






Re: NYC USRA DESIGN STEEL BOXCARS

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote :


Has anyone a dimensioned drawing of a triple valve they can share?  Any era.  All sides.  Even a couple of photos of drawings will help.

 

Dave Nelson

==================

Very difficult to find, and may be non-existent. Since the brake parts were vendor supplied, the railroad only needed to know the locations of the mounting holes, but not the details of the actual valve housings. That info would have been in the drawing files of WABCO or New York Air Brake Co., but I'm not aware of either drawing archive being available to the public, if they were saved at all.

The old standby is to find a drawing that appears to have been drawn to scale and has one identifiable dimension, such as the distance between the mounting holes, which can be picked up from a "steel details" drawing that dimensions the mounting bracket. Or, measure a valve yourself.

Dennis Storzek


Re: NYC USRA DESIGN STEEL BOXCARS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Thank you Roger for your reply.  This certsinly answers my question.  I would very much like to obtain a copy of this drawing, however,  I don't seeem to be able to access this information on the website.  Possibly you have to be a member.  I will be happy to putchase this drawing.  Any suggestions on how?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Roger Hinman rhinman11@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date: 01/27/2016 12:33 (GMT-10:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC USRA DESIGN STEEL BOXCARS

 

NYC drawing Q53551 is for AB brake system retrofits on many of these cars.  According to that drawing the brake cylinder and the reservoir are on the same side of the car. the valve is on the other side of the car directly opposite the reservoir. This makes for a very clean routing of the pipes.

The drawing is available from the NYCHS.

Roger Hinman
On Jan 26, 2016, at 11:45 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Ted Culotta's STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS REERENCE MANUAL VOLUME 1 has several good shots of the NYC USTA design steel
boxcars. The cars in several shots have been converted to an AB brake system. In these shots it is clear that the air reservoir is on
the same side of the cara as the brake cylinder. What I cannot determine is the location of the striple valve. Any help would
be greatly app[reciated.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie



Re: Machining car end?

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <grangerroads@...> wrote :

Vector CAD/CAM. It has a 3D module, but at the time I bought the package I didn't buy that.

================

So, all you have to work with is a 2-1/2D CAM package.

SIDE NOTE: 2-1/2D describes the ability to move 2 axes concurrently, but only move the third while the other two are stopped. You can cut a circle with 2-1/2D, driving the tool around the curved perimeter in the XY plane, then increment the Z down while the other two are stopped. To cut a hemisphere, you need full 3D; all axes moving simultaneously.

It should be possible to cut a Dreadnaught end with 2-1/2D software. A number of years ago we had a machine control that was only capable of 2-1/2D motion, but we could select which two axes were active together. To do this end, I would build the solid model and orient laying on the flat back, then section it crosswise (across the width of the car) in small increments, then toolpath the mill to cut each profile in the ZX plane, incrementing in the Y to begin the next profile. You will need to finish with a ball nose tool as small or smaller than the smallest radius in the part. A .015" ball nose end mill should do, as a quick look at some drawings shows 7/8" to be the smallest radius, which is just a tad less than .0075" in TT scale, which is the radius of a .015" diameter tool. A .012 or .014 diameter tool would be better, but .015 is much more available. To get a smooth finish you likely want to increment over only .001 at a time. It's a lot of cuts, but you'll get there eventually. From experience, the "cusp", the ridges between each toolpath, will likely show the most in the fillets where each "wale" and "dart" blends to the basic shape of the end, and some contour toolpaths that follow the fillets around in the XY plane may be needed to smooth them out.

That begs the question of where to get the information to program the 3D model. NONE of the drawings published in the normal places have enough information. Drawings in hobby magazines are worthless, and the Car Builder's Cyclopedias only have what are called General Arrangement drawings. The purpose of these drawings is to show how the parts fit together into the whole. You need the drawings that actually define the parts, in this case typically called "End Detail" drawings. These drawings typically show the two end sheets separately, so the details of the lap seam can be seen, and have numerous sectional views, both horizontal and vertical. Here is an example of the type of drawing you need:

NWHS NW-E48980-NW Mech Dwg

 

Unfortunately, the N&W H.S. archives does not have much on reefers.


Dennis Storzek



 
 


Re: NYC USRA DESIGN STEEL BOXCARS

Dave Nelson
 

I can endorse Roger’s mention of the NYCHS – I have their cd’s for both boxcars and gondolas.  The drawing sets are not 100% complete… some cars are covered really well, others are a short of describing a whole car.  One example is the purchased brake equipment – you get a G.A. DWG which is very useful, but not any dimensioned drawings of the actual equipment, which leads to my question:

 

Has anyone a dimensioned drawing of a triple valve they can share?  Any era.  All sides.  Even a couple of photos of drawings will help.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 2:34 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC USRA DESIGN STEEL BOXCARS

 



NYC drawing Q53551 is for AB brake system retrofits on many of these cars.  According to that drawing the brake cylinder and the reservoir are on the same side of the car. the valve is on the other side of the car directly opposite the reservoir. This makes for a very clean routing of the pipes.

The drawing is available from the NYCHS.

 

Roger Hinman

 


Stans parts

Allan Smith
 

Are Stan Rydarowicx parts still available? I am looking for the CGW and WLE PS-o boxcars.

Al Smith
Sonora CA


Re: Machining car end?

grangerroads@...
 

> Rhino should certainly be able to handle the model generation... What are you using for CAM software, if I may ask? <

Vector CAD/CAM. It has a 3D module, but at the time I bought the package I didn't buy that.

You know the old adage, if you can't say anything nice about anybody, don't say anything? . . .

-Brian C.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


Re: Black Cement Roofs

George Courtney
 

Thanks for the replies.

  I noticed my NKP kit also is a Viking roof so of the four cars I have with black roofs three are Viking roofs.  The Santa Fe car is a Murphy roof with running boards painted the car color.  I'm modeling 1953 so I'll need a well faded black roof from Mr. Golden's fine information.

Thanks,
George Courtney


Re: NYC USRA DESIGN STEEL BOXCARS

ROGER HINMAN
 

NYC drawing Q53551 is for AB brake system retrofits on many of these cars.  According to that drawing the brake cylinder and the reservoir are on the same side of the car. the valve is on the other side of the car directly opposite the reservoir. This makes for a very clean routing of the pipes.
The drawing is available from the NYCHS.

Roger Hinman

On Jan 26, 2016, at 11:45 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Ted Culotta's STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS REERENCE MANUAL VOLUME 1 has several good shots of the NYC USTA design steel
boxcars. The cars in several shots have been converted to an AB brake system. In these shots it is clear that the air reservoir is on
the same side of the cara as the brake cylinder. What I cannot determine is the location of the striple valve. Any help would
be greatly app[reciated.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie



Re: E-Bay Decals/ Decals that are too small

Allen Ferguson
 

We can resize most of our HO decals to TT. Email me off group 
Allen Ferguson 
Black Cat Publishing- Model Railroad Decals



Re: Machining car end?

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <grangerroads@...> wrote :

Dennis,

I have Rhino 3D but do not have 3D CAM software. And, I haven't yet taken the time to learn much of Rhino. I create drawings in AutoCAD 2D, recreate them in Inventor 3D to check part fit and appearance, then proceed to CNC-cut parts and assemble them for resin casting.

==================
Rhino should certainly be able to handle the model generation... What are you using for CAM software, if I may ask?

Dennis Storzek


Re: L&N hopper far from home

midrly
 

Probably CN company service coal for the Spadina or Mimico roundhouse. 

Steve Lucas.


Re: Machining car end?

grangerroads@...
 

Dennis,

I have Rhino 3D but do not have 3D CAM software. And, I haven't yet taken the time to learn much of Rhino. I create drawings in AutoCAD 2D, recreate them in Inventor 3D to check part fit and appearance, then proceed to CNC-cut parts and assemble them for resin casting.

So far, I've cut simple round, smooth contours by manually placing tool paths at incremental cut depths of .001". Doing this with an IDE would be tedious, I know. . . .

-Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


Winter Sale ending

Tony Thompson
 

The Signature Press Winter Sale is ending soon. January 31 is the last day. Prices of some titles are as much as 35 percent off. To see which titles are on sale, and to read more about each of them, visit the website at: www.signaturepress.com

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Dick Harley Reefer Photos

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Historian and modeler Dick Harley of Laguna Beach, CA, has a number of excellent PFE refrigerator car photos on his website (https://harley-trains.smugmug.com/) as well as other railroad-related items. The photos concentrate on details.

 

Here are the links to the refrigerator car photos:

 

Wood sheathed ice bunker reefers:

https://harley-trains.smugmug.com/PFETrainPhotos/PFE-Wood-Ice-Reefers

There are several underbody shots of drains and wheel-driven fan systems.

 

Steel sheathed ice bunker reefers:

https://harley-trains.smugmug.com/PFETrainPhotos/PFE-Steel-Ice-Reefers

 

Mechanical reefers:

https://harley-trains.smugmug.com/PFETrainPhotos/PFE-Mechanical-Reefers

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


Re: USATC Long Flat

Benjamin Hom
 

Gary Ray asked:
"My friend is doing a clinic on US military cars on German railways after WWII. He has models and photos of the 50’ USATC Long Flat (US Specs) but would like to find a dimensional drawing. I’ve searched the internet without success. He believes the 50’ Walther’s Trainline flat (http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/931-1602) is similar. Any help in locating a dimensional drawing or more info on the Walther’s flat (prototype) would be greatly appreciated."

Could you provide a link to a prototype photo? As for the Walthers Trainline flat (not to be confused with their GSC flat car, http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/910-5100), it's a direct knockoff of the Athearn 50 ft flat car down to the rivet pattern, number of stake pockets, and oddball handbrake. This model has no prototype. I'm very skeptical that it's a match to the prototype in question, but this model is coincidentally close to a few prototypes, so it's possible . I'll need to see a photo to make the call.


Ben Hom


Re: Machining car end?

destorzek@...
 

Do you have 3D surfacing capabilities?

Dennis Storzek


Machining car end?

grangerroads@...
 

I work only in TT scale (yeah, it's alive, barely, but friends of the scale are attempting a revival), one of my CAD/CAM projects at the moment is a transition era refrigerator car. Perhaps someone here has CNC-cut Dreadnaught ends and might be willing to give me a tip or two about approaching such a cut?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa



USATC Long Flat

Gary Ray
 

Hi,

My friend is doing a clinic on US military cars on German railways after WWII.  He has models and photos of the 50’ USATC Long Flat (US Specs) but would like to find a dimensional drawing.  I’ve searched the internet without success.  He believes the 50’ Walther’s Trainline flat (http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/931-1602) is similar.  Any help in locating a dimensional drawing or more info on the Walther’s flat (prototype) would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Gary Ray


Fw: new message

dtnewcomb
 

Hey!

 

Open message http://gresanoia.com/serious.php

 

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