Date   

Re: Tichy's USRA SS Rebuilt P&LE ~ PMcKY 40 foot box

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Greg,

Check "Rebuilt 40-foot USRA Box Cars" by Richard Hendrickson in the July 1993 RMJ. It is a general article, but Richard's main car is the P&LE.

There is another article by Martin Loftin, "USRA 40-foot Box Cars, Part II, the Rebuilt Single-Sheathed Cars" in the April 1992 RMJ.

Finally, I have Bob Hundman's "USRA Rebuild, Part II, Single-Sheathed" in the July 1988 MM. This has some very good photos of the P&LE cars, but the drawing is of a DT&I car.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/3/16 9:37 PM, gregsnook@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Good evening,

While preparing for the upcoming PRRPRO group's X26/X26C project, I found two Tichy USRA cars, the original single sheathed kit and a "normal" rebuilt car that I purchased as part of a group of Westerfield cars I purchased, and then forgot about.
Is there a good source for back issues of RMC, specifically the article on the P&LE cars mentioned ago (a long time ago)?  The article mentioned below appears to be beyond the timeline of back issues offered on their website.  I attempted a few google searches, but no luck there either.

Thanks much for any thoughts,
Greg Snook


Re: Question about ITC '47 built box cars

Ed Hawkins
 

Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] wrote:
Hello-
I have been gathering up information for some Illinois Terminal Co. post-war 40' 10'6" IH box cars with single 6' door opening.

In a large table on the Steam Era Freight Car Web site, Ed Hawkins described a class of 1947 built ITC cars in the series of 6500-6849 with Gypsum running boards, Ajax power brakes and the one-year-only 6/6/5 Youngstown steel post-war door (affectionately named the "upside-down door" by some modelers). I have not found a photo of this series of cars, but I did find a late 1960s Jim Sands shot of ITC 6903 with the same doors/ladders as the series in question. This car has been repainted in a more simplified scheme than the earlier shadowed bill board lettering I believe these cars were originally wearing.

Could the 6500-6849 series have extended beyond these numbers and therefore the 6903 is part of the same series, or were there more than the noted 350 cars built? I also think that maybe there might have been a renumbering, perhaps due to a reasignment, but I just don't know.

Any ITC fans who wish to address these questions have my gratitude. I will be offering an Enhanced kit, with decals, for this car on the STMFC list this Friday.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
Andy,
The ITC 6500-6849 cars were built by ACF ca. 7-47 in lot no. 3063. They had 4-4 Improved Dreadnaught ends, Murphy panel roofs, and Youngstown doors having a 5-5-4 corrugation pattern top to bottom.

Following soon thereafter were ITC 6850-6999 ca. 11-48 in ACF lot 3311. They were nearly the same as lot 3063 except they received Improved Dreadnaught ends with a top rectangular corrugation. Both series of cars had Ajax hand brakes and U.S. Gypsum running boards & brake steps.

Photos from both series were in RMJ articles Feb. 1990 (ACF photo of 6948), Feb. 1991 (ACF photo of 6849) and Nov. 1999 (1958 in-service photo of 6831).
Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Tichy's USRA SS Rebuilt P&LE ~ PMcKY 40 foot box

greg snook
 

Good evening,
While preparing for the upcoming PRRPRO group's X26/X26C project, I found two Tichy USRA cars, the original single sheathed kit and a "normal" rebuilt car that I purchased as part of a group of Westerfield cars I purchased, and then forgot about.
Is there a good source for back issues of RMC, specifically the article on the P&LE cars mentioned ago (a long time ago)?  The article mentioned below appears to be beyond the timeline of back issues offered on their website.  I attempted a few google searches, but no luck there either.

Thanks much for any thoughts,
Greg Snook


Re: C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

Allan Smith
 

Railway Prototype Cyc #6 p17 has a photo of car # 1 RPC #8 P1-4 has photos of car #2-5 also on page 4 is a photo of the end of car #5. It looks like Pullman Standard proprietary 9 rib end as shown on PS-0 boxcars.The cars also have Superior 7 panel doors The roofs are Murphy Improved solid steel riveted ( from the photos it looks like diagonal panels hard to tell with out other evidence) Apex Tri-lok running boards and brake step Ajax power hand brakes.

Al Smith
Sonora CA


Question about ITC '47 built box cars

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-
I have been gathering up information for some Illinois Terminal Co. post-war 40' 10'6" IH box cars with single 6' door opening.

In a large table on the Steam Era Freight Car Web site, Ed Hawkins described a class of 1947 built ITC cars in the series of 6500-6849 with Gypsum running boards, Ajax power brakes and the one-year-only 6/6/5 Youngstown steel post-war door (affectionately named the "upside-down door" by some modelers).  I have not found a photo of this series of cars, but I did find a late 1960s Jim Sands shot of ITC 6903 with the same doors/ladders as the series in question. This car has been repainted in a more simplified scheme than the earlier shadowed bill board lettering I believe these cars were originally wearing.

Could the 6500-6849 series have extended beyond these numbers and therefore the 6903 is part of the same series, or were there more than the noted 350 cars built? I also think that maybe there might have been a renumbering, perhaps due to a reasignment, but I just don't know.

Any ITC fans who wish to address these questions have my gratitude. I will be offering an Enhanced kit, with decals, for this car on the STMFC list this Friday.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

Benjamin Hom
 


"no1detail@..." (please sign your name) asked:
"I have two sheets of the decals.  What is wrong with the Intermountain or the Red Caboose 1937 car?"

The main issue associated with the prototype vs. the models is the ends, which are proprietary Pullman-Standard carbuilder ends that do not match the Dreadnaught end of these kits.

As for the kits themselves, the Intermountain kit's rectangular panel roof is somewhat less than desirable.  The Red Caboose roof is a much better representation of the prototype and will fit the Intermountain body with minor modifications.


"Does any body know how long these cars kept their Allied Full Cushion Trucks?"

When do you model?


Ben Hom


Re: C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

Andy Carlson
 

If your car is indeed a 1945 car, the ends of both Red Caboose and Intermountain 1937 AAR box cars would have the probably too-early (for you) 4/5 early Dreadnaught end. You will find that the Intermountain '37 car would be an easier kitbash, as their ends are separate castings whereas the RC ends are molded as part of the one-piece body. The ends I suspect you will need are the IMRC 3/4 improved Dreadnaught ends. I don't know about your particular car, though I suspect that the doors may be wrong, as well.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA




From: "no1detail@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, February 3, 2016 11:56 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

 
I have two sheets of the decals.  What is wrong with the Intermountain or the Red Caboose 1937 car.  I am about to start this project your help is appreciated.  Does any body know how long these cars kept their Allied Full Cushoin Trucks?

Thank you



Re: C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

no1detail@...
 

I have two sheets of the decals.  What is wrong with the Intermountain or the Red Caboose 1937 car.  I am about to start this project your help is appreciated.  Does any body know how long these cars kept their Allied Full Cushoin Trucks?

Thank you


tank car article

Tony Thompson
 

The February issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist contains the latest of my "Getting Real" columns. It is about prototype design, construction and use of tank cars. You can download it for free any time from their website at: www.mrhmag.com . Also I have provided some background to the column, including Larry Kline's contributions, in a blog post, which you can read if you're interested at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2016/02/my-column-in-february-mrh.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Machining car end?

hockenheim68
 

Brian,

E-mail me at hockenheim68atyahoodotcom and I'll show you what I made and what it was based off of. I've forgotten how to direct message from within the groups so this will have to suffice.

Andrew Hutchinson


---In STMFC@..., <grangerroads@...> wrote :

> . . . a small home-made injection moulder for personal use. <

Andrew, did you work from plans to build your IM? Do you have information you wouldn't mind sharing? Thanks.

-Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


Re: Machining car end?

grangerroads@...
 

> . . . a small home-made injection moulder for personal use. <

Andrew, did you work from plans to build your IM? Do you have information you wouldn't mind sharing? Thanks.

-Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


Re: C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

Bill Welch
 

IIRC Microscale has a set for these cars now w/all of the different slogans. Someone needs to do the ends, not sure about the roof but I think the IM 1937 car provides the correct body configuration.

Bill Welch


Re: C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

SUVCWORR@...
 

Neither.   Express service in Passenger trains.

Rich Orr


-----Original Message-----
From: gsc3@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Feb 1, 2016 7:02 pm
Subject: [STMFC] C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.



The Chicago & Eastern Illinois 1945 boxcars numbered 1 through 4 (or 5).  Were they for on-line LCL service or in the general pool?

Thanks,
George Courtney



C&EI yellow and blue 1945 boxcars.

George Courtney
 

The Chicago & Eastern Illinois 1945 boxcars numbered 1 through 4 (or 5).  Were they for on-line LCL service or in the general pool?


Thanks,

George Courtney


GATX Type 30 tank car

Eric Hansmann
 

Frank Hodina has bashed together components to make an HO scale GATX Type 30 tank car. Check out the details on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/gatx-type-30-tank-car-project/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Box car interior

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <toddchorton@...> wrote :

Looking at photos of car interiors it seems like the side boards were typically placed horizontally and the end board were typically placed vertically. Does anyone have any information that contradicts this?
===============

But not the car in the photo, which has wood ends. When steel ends became the norm, the various corrugations and stiffening ribs almost universally ran horizontal. The made space available for the nailers for the lining to run horizontal, and not take any additional space, so the end lining was run vertically.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Box car interior

Todd Sullivan
 

To add to Dennis's remarks, ...

Boxcar interiors usually exhibited a certain amount of dirt and wear from various ladings.  As boxcars aged and became more decrepit, they were suitable for lower and lower grades of cargo.  When I worked as a clerk in Portland, OR in the early 1960s, boxcars were graded by the car inspectors as suitable for (best to worst):
(NOTE: we shipped 75 carloads of paper/day from a paper warehouse we served.)

RP = paper in rolls (clean and smooth interior, tight doors)
CP = paper in cartons
MDSE = merchandise
GR = grain (car had to have tight floor, sides and doors)
FL = finished lumber
RL = rough lumber
RF = rough freight (rough interior, holes in floor and in side linings, gaps in doors)
FEED = bulk feed (unsuitable for any other lading)
HIDES = green hides (unsuitable for any other lading)

Todd Sullivan
Liverpool, NY


Re: Box car interior

Todd Horton
 

Looking at photos of car interiors it seems like the side boards were typically placed horizontally and the end board were typically placed vertically. Does anyone have any information that contradicts this?

Of the few photos of cars I've seen built in the earlier years some tended to have only wood siding only half way. I have an interior photo of some C of G series 51001-51500 boxcars built 1914 that are like this. There's no planking on the ends of these cars.


Todd Horton




From: "edb8391@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2016 10:32 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Box car interior

 
For the most part in the period this site follows, wood was used to line the interior of box cars. No need for paint or any finish coat, so it was plain. 

However, floors got scuffed up from hand carts and later, fork lifts.  Sometimes non-skid metal plates were put over the flooring at the doorways to reduce such floor damage.

Side walls also saw distress from loads shifting, as well as blocking or other retaining materials fastened to them. Later box cars were sometimes equipped with fittings set into the wall sheathings for various types of load retainers.

As for running a boxcar with the doors open, this was against the rules for many roads. B&O was one.
Compliance depended on the yard and road crews.  Doors on empty cars were to be closed and latched before moving them, after the conductor or a brakeman checked interior.

This was because if a box car's heavy door is not made secure, it could possibly become free to move back and forth in its track while underway and cause damage. Keeping empty boxcar doors closed and latched for running also reduced the likelihood of any human 'super-cargo' getting aboard. 

Again, compliance was up to yard and train crews who did not always follow rule book minutiae if inconvenient. Then too, sometimes box cars could be moved with their doors open. However, this was usually done within a yard, in a switching move, or possibly a short transfer run.

Ed Bommer  





Re: Box car interior

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <edb8391@...> wrote :
As for running a boxcar with the doors open, this was against the rules for many roads. B&O was one.
Compliance depended on the yard and road crews.  Doors on empty cars were to be closed and latched before moving them, after the conductor or a brakeman checked interior.

This was because if a box car's heavy door is not made secure, it could possibly become free to move back and forth in its track while underway and cause damage. Keeping empty boxcar doors closed and latched for running also reduced the likelihood of any human 'super-cargo' getting aboard.
Ed Bommer  

=========

The desire to reduce damage to free sliding doors drove a lot of door hardware design through the first half of the twentieth century. Initially, boxcar doors were supported by rollers at the top, like a barn door, and held closed with a hasp. These indeed would roll back and forth from slack action if the hasp wasn't fastened.

By the WWI era Camel door starters were popular. This is the short visible in photos handle under the hasp. It's main purpose was to cam the door open the first couple inches, to get it free of the spark guard, but the free end of the cam was shaped like a hook, and would catch a free sliding door if it slammed shut and keep it from moving again. Dangerous for both kids and 'bos, as one could get trapped in the car.

Youngstown steel doors made the move to bottom supported doors, with rollers along the bottom edge that ran on a track. In the original design, one of these rollers was mounted on a cam; the door frame sat solidly on the track unless the handle was pushed to lower the roller and raise the door so it would roll. The intention was if this door was left open it would tend to stay in place, as it was not sitting on the rollers. These usually also had Camel starters so if one did slide shut, it would be restrained. The post-war improved version had a central handle rodded to cams on both rollers.

Superior  took a slightly different approach on their welded panel doors; their central handle was a gravity latch which would fall into a notch in the lower door track, thus immobilizing the door.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Box car interior

Edward
 

For the most part in the period this site follows, wood was used to line the interior of box cars. No need for paint or any finish coat, so it was plain. 

However, floors got scuffed up from hand carts and later, fork lifts.  Sometimes non-skid metal plates were put over the flooring at the doorways to reduce such floor damage.

Side walls also saw distress from loads shifting, as well as blocking or other retaining materials fastened to them. Later box cars were sometimes equipped with fittings set into the wall sheathings for various types of load retainers.

As for running a boxcar with the doors open, this was against the rules for many roads. B&O was one.
Compliance depended on the yard and road crews.  Doors on empty cars were to be closed and latched before moving them, after the conductor or a brakeman checked interior.

This was because if a box car's heavy door is not made secure, it could possibly become free to move back and forth in its track while underway and cause damage. Keeping empty boxcar doors closed and latched for running also reduced the likelihood of any human 'super-cargo' getting aboard. 

Again, compliance was up to yard and train crews who did not always follow rule book minutiae if inconvenient. Then too, sometimes box cars could be moved with their doors open. However, this was usually done within a yard, in a switching move, or possibly a short transfer run.

Ed Bommer  


54461 - 54480 of 194714