Date   

Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

Benjamin Hom
 

Al Smith wrote:

"If you go to google search and type in Station Reweigh and symbols. Select the steam era sight It will take you to www.steamerafreightcars.com/.../resources/StationandReweighSymbols.pdf That will give you the railroad repair facilities towns and codes."

Here we go muddying the waters again. While any number of different maintenance procedures can happen when a car is on the rip track or in the shops, please keep in mind that these are distinct requirements. Don't confuse reweighing with repainting or repacking or brake maintenance. Each procedure is recorded with different stencils on the car but may not happen on the same date. This continues to trip up even some of the more expereinced modelers on this list.


Ben Hom


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

Allan Smith
 

If you go to google search and type in Station Rewiegh and symbols. Select the steam era sight It will take you to www.steamerafreightcars.com/.../resources/StationandReweighSymbols.pdf   That will give you the railroad repair facilities towns and codes.

Those decals were available from Champ as HD-50-53.

Al Smith
Sonora CA


Re: Tank Car Reporting Marks

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <jimbetz@...> wrote :

Almost all of the have the reporting marks on the frame -
as well as on the left end of the tank.

Is that so they can be identified when the tank leaves the
frame during a wreck? Something else? Is this a 'standard'
and if so when was it introduced and/or repealed?
- Jim B.
============

Yes.

That is actually common on all types of freight cars... Boxcars typically had the reporting marks stenciled inside on the side plate, on the doors (usually on the inside), on the centersill (but normally only on one side), and on the trucks (usually, but not always, on the bolsters.) The whole car could come apart in a wreck, and hopefully all the pieces would end up at home. The centersill stenciling was hard to see, and most often covered with dirt. Those of us who spent time crawling around under work equipment are familiar with these, as they were seldom changed when the car went in work service, and thus were the car's last revenue number.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Lube markings practices?

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

 

If you are doing this detail - whose decals are you using and
what are you doing about the -need- for a variety of 'shops' to
use? And do you have some feeling for how many different
'shops' would be needed in order to have an acceptable feel
for "these cars have been serviced away from their home
roads fairly frequently"?


      The many Sunshine decal sets for reweigh symbols also included repack data, as do most Speedwitch sets and newer Microscale sets. Richard Hendrickson was of the opinion, after studying a heck of a lot of prototype photos, that at least of 80 percent of the repacks were from the owning road. But of course the characters are so tiny as to be awfully difficult to read, so I have chosen not to worry about exactly what they say or what date they bear, for most models. And BTW, Richard also believed that repack frequency was approximately annually with solid-bearing trucks.
       Then there are the brake service rules, and the lettering to go with it. That, and repack data, were the subjects of two posts on my blog. If you're interested, here are the links:


The second link shows the recommended lettering content and arrangement, though many photos contradict it.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Tank Car Reporting Marks

Thomas Birkett
 

Yes stenciling reporting marks on underframes was a standard going back at least to 1921. Two reasons for this: in case of a derailment when the tank and underframe can get separated and the fact that the tank in those days was not subject to time limits of usage but the underframe was (counter intuitive but that is the way it was and is at least until the 1990s.) I have a good photo of PSPX 13199 showing separate built dates for tank and underframe.

Tom Birkett

Bartlesville, OK





From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 1:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tank Car Reporting Marks





Hi,

While I was looking for repack/lube markings I noticed
something about almost all of the tank cars that I don't
remember hearing talked about before/knowing about.

Almost all of the have the reporting marks on the frame -
as well as on the left end of the tank.

Is that so they can be identified when the tank leaves the
frame during a wreck? Something else? Is this a 'standard'
and if so when was it introduced and/or repealed?
- Jim B.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: What do these trucks look like?

pennsylvania1954
 

Brian--Thanks much. That helps a lot.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Tank Car Reporting Marks

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

While I was looking for repack/lube markings I noticed
something about almost all of the tank cars that I don't
remember hearing talked about before/knowing about.

Almost all of the have the reporting marks on the frame -
as well as on the left end of the tank.

Is that so they can be identified when the tank leaves the
frame during a wreck? Something else? Is this a 'standard'
and if so when was it introduced and/or repealed?
- Jim B.


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

And to add, in case not previously covered:

Champ and Sunshine both did re-weigh and re-pack stenciling decals sets, for the steam era. They contained numerous roads' stncil info, for a variety of dates. You may find same out there.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 12:55 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [STMFC] Re: Lube markings practices?



Jim as far as I know there were no specifications before 1966, beyond what Dennis posted yesterday. I know of no website that focuses on the subject. But if you look at freight car photos, esp boxcars, you will see the stencil somewhere above or near the right truck, just as Dennis said. It will be two or three lines, small letters, usually white in color with abbreviations for the shop that did the work.

You are asking about detail lettering that was of little or no concern for many years to modelers and manufacturers. And most decal printers probably copied the same info in each new decal set as well. To my knowledge such detail has only become available since folks like Richard Hendrickson and Ted Culotta began pointing it out in their freight car articles. And the manufactures like Lifelike PK2000 began including such lettering on their models. And the decal pro ducers realized there was a market for such detail.



As far as era goes, photos will be your guide. As for locations, any location where railroads had a RIP track might qualify. You will have to hunt down the proper lettering for you specific railroad or location.



Doug Harding

Blockedwww.iowacentralrr.org <Blockedhttp://www.iowacentralrr.org>


Re: Lube markings practices?

Jim Betz
 

Hi all,

I should have used "Lube/Repack Data" for the subject ... thankfully
you guys knew what I was talking about ... *G* (To answer one
question - no I am not talking about the COTS labels. Too late.)

****

I just spent almost 2 hours looking at as many photos as I could
find for the era this list is dedicated to - and solidified my thinking
about "the general look and placement of the lube/repack data".
As more than one of you pointed out there are variations but, in
general,

1) The prior data was painted over ... often in a color
that makes them even hard to find - but just as
often in a non-similar color with either black or
tuscan being the most common choice for the
"patch".

2) Then the new data was stenciled into that patch.

3) The patch is usually - but not always - above the right
truck. If the car has one of those "tabs" sticking down
from the general line of the sill it is often placed in
that tab. I found several cars where it was placed
to the left of the door about half way between the
left edge of the door and the end of the car (mostly
when done by/for UP - what's that about?).

4) As you go backward in time it gets harder and harder to
find this detail. Perhaps they were placed somewhere
else before about 1940? If the photo is dated earlier
than about 1935 or so there does not seem to be any
such detail on the side of the car any where. Did I
miss it?

Tom Birkett sent me a copy of a document detailing what
was included in this info.

****

If you are doing this detail - whose decals are you using and
what are you doing about the -need- for a variety of 'shops' to
use? And do you have some feeling for how many different
'shops' would be needed in order to have an acceptable feel
for "these cars have been serviced away from their home
roads fairly frequently"?
- Jim


Re: What do these trucks look like?

brianleppert@att.net
 

"Dual Control" was a term used by the National Malleable and Steel Castings Co. for describing some features of their B-1 trucks.  Athearn and Kadee offer these National B-1 trucks in HO.

Railway Truck Corp. offered a variety of snubbing designs that worked with standard AAR truck side frames, so there is no one unique look.  Their Snub-Up Truck Unit used a special truck bolster, as shown in the 1949-1951 CBC, but spotting features are minor.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV.


Re: Lube markings practices?

Douglas Harding
 

Jim as far as I know there were no specifications before 1966, beyond what Dennis posted yesterday. I know of no website that focuses on the subject. But if you look at freight car photos, esp boxcars, you will see the stencil somewhere above or near the right truck, just as Dennis said. It will be two or three lines, small letters, usually white in color with abbreviations for the shop that did the work.

You are asking about detail lettering that was of little or no concern for many years to modelers and manufacturers. And most decal printers probably copied the same info in each new decal set as well. To my knowledge such detail has only become available since folks like Richard Hendrickson and Ted Culotta began pointing it out in their freight car articles. And the manufactures like Lifelike PK2000 began including such lettering on their models. And the decal producers realized there was a market for such detail.

 

As far as era goes, photos will be your guide. As for locations, any location where railroads had a RIP track might qualify. You will have to hunt down the proper lettering for you specific railroad or location.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


caboose ladders

ed_mines
 

Can some give the dimensions of the Taurus etched caboose ladders - i.e. width, thickness, hole size..........


Ditto for the etched ladder provided in some of the Sunshine SP(?) single sheathed box car kits.


I'm getting good results with Yarmouth eye bolts on the hand rails of a QualityCraft caboose kit.


Ed Mines


Re: Lube markings practices?

Jim Betz
 

Hi again,

So it would appear that my best approach to this question
is to find pictures that show the lube/repack data markings.

Is there a web site (s?) that focuses on that aspect?

It would help me if that site was organized by era and by
location and/or that it had pictures that are easily
identified in terms of the date and location that the
lube/repack info was done. And, as long as I'm stating
my preferences ... it should include examples of West
Coast markings.
- Jim


Weathering Trucks

Eric Hansmann
 

Armand,

I posted techniques on my blog that have worked for me. Here's the link.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2015/06/18/wheelsets-and-trucks/


Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX





On February 8, 2016 at 3:50 AM "'Armand' armprem@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:



Speaking of trucks,how are they best weathered/ Armand Premo


Re: Resin Car Works Tank Car kits

Rich C
 

Guys, according to Eric, all the kits still available, but are temporarily out of stock, awaiting detail parts etc. True the Hooker tanker is sold out.

Rich Christie


On Sunday, February 7, 2016 8:55 PM, "LOUIS WHITELEY octoraro1@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
WTB Resin Car Works kit 1.05.

By the time I finally figured out which one I need, they were all gone!  Did anybody get an extra 1.05 Hooker 8K kit that he or she would part with?

Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ

octoraro1@...



On Tuesday, August 18, 2015 4:08 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
A little bird with knowledge and authority told me RCW is down to eleven 8K and twenty 7K AC&F acid tank car kits.  The caster is bored casting them and photo-etched parts are exhausted. It will be a long time if ever before these come around again.

Just say'in
Bill Welch 





Re: What do these trucks look like?

armprem
 


Speaking of trucks,how are they best weathered/ Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 12:48 AM
Subject: [STMFC] What do these trucks look like?

Good evening--Back on Dec 11, in a stream on the weights of different trucks, Mike Schleigh used these trucks as examples:

Railway Truck Corp. Snub-Up----7240 pounds
    Dual Control----7160 pounds
    ASF A-3----7140 pounds
    Barber S-2 Stabilized----7380

I can easily identify HO models for the last two using Richard Hendrickson's HO SCALE FREIGHT TRUCKS and Tahoe Model Works' listing. However, the first two are unknowns. Can anyone point to models of the Snub-Up and Dual Control?

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


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Re: K Brakes

Jack Mullen
 

Ted,
Thanks for the quick reply. I'd been planning to get the PRRPs, but just hadn't gotten around to it. So, spurred by your note, I went to your site, ordered and downloaded the first three PRPs. Very quick process.  

I've been browsing in them, and can recommend them highly. All those familiar with the Essential Freight Cars series will have a general idea of what to expect, but in greater detail and with more, and higher rez photos. 

Yes, there are two decent photos of cars with the hybrid AB conversion. The coverage of the Murphy XLA and Flexible roofs in the L&N volume will be a useful reference.
I'm looking forward to future titles.

Jack Mullen


What do these trucks look like?

pennsylvania1954
 

Good evening--Back on Dec 11, in a stream on the weights of different trucks, Mike Schleigh used these trucks as examples:

Railway Truck Corp. Snub-Up----7240 pounds
    Dual Control----7160 pounds
    ASF A-3----7140 pounds
    Barber S-2 Stabilized----7380

I can easily identify HO models for the last two using Richard Hendrickson's HO SCALE FREIGHT TRUCKS and Tahoe Model Works' listing. However, the first two are unknowns. Can anyone point to models of the Snub-Up and Dual Control?

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL



Re: Resin Car Works Tank Car kits

LOUIS WHITELEY <octoraro1@...>
 

WTB Resin Car Works kit 1.05.

By the time I finally figured out which one I need, they were all gone!  Did anybody get an extra 1.05 Hooker 8K kit that he or she would part with?

Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ

octoraro1@...



On Tuesday, August 18, 2015 4:08 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
A little bird with knowledge and authority told me RCW is down to eleven 8K and twenty 7K AC&F acid tank car kits.  The caster is bored casting them and photo-etched parts are exhausted. It will be a long time if ever before these come around again.

Just say'in
Bill Welch 



Re: Lube markings practices?

Dennis Storzek
 

The "Journal Pac", or references to "lubricators" also came very late in the history of solid bearings, post 1960 IIRC. Both are references to proprietary journal pads rather than loose waste.

Pre 1960 was just RPKD, date, and station symbol stenciled in contrasting color in the vicinity of the right hand bolster. Roads could paint out the old data however they wanted; some roads tried to match the car color (red or black), some roads just used their standard FC color on everything, some roads used black on everything.

Dennis Storzek