Date   

Re: Weathering Trucks

Jim Betz
 

Eric,

I have switched over to using "craft acrylics" for weathering. I have a
fairly large supply of the Delta Ceramcoat paints. They come in 4 oz.
bottles that cost less than an ounce bottle of any "RR paint".
I am not sure where to get them any more. I used to buy them at
Michael's or JoAnn's and the last time I was in either of those they
did not have them.
The thing to look for in a "craft acrylic" is the density of the pigment.
The cheaper brands don't put as much color in the paint.
I have a full complement of craft acrylic "earth tones". And often add
some colors that are well outside of that label (in -small- quantities).

I should add - I very rarely use an airbrush for my primary weathering
any more. It's been almost a decade not since I stopped doing that (more?).
Almost all of my -weathering- is done with detail touches (brush) and
'washes'. And runs of grime where roofs and doors drain. And "dry
brush" streaks. And ... well, you get the idea.
After I have the weathering where I like it I will hit the car with
a very light application of "dull coat" ... to lock it all in place ... and
then - some times - after it is fully dry (2 days or more later) I will apply
some very light "blending coats" of weathering colors (airbrush) ... usually
a lacquer such as Floquil and colors such as "grimy black" and "dust" and
"mud".
I also use artists chalks - in earth tones and blending several different
shades to get the color(s) that I want. I especially prefer chalks for
doing stuff like grain spills, cement spills, and iron ore spills.

** Trucks and Wheels **

I use all hand painting for weathering trucks and wheels.

For the trucks I -start- by doing the wheels! I do them by using a
fairly dense mix of color = usually either a dull rust (fully oxidized)
or grey (mud). All the wheels on each car get the same color - but
I try to have different wheel colors/shades on different cars. And
to have the wheels at least a couple of shades different from the
trucks. Just load the brush and insert it in against the axle and the
wheel face and turn the wheel with your finger. Don't paint the
tread!
Then I use an oxidized rust color and brush paint the truck side
frames with a paint thin enough to run and not show any 'ridges'.
I don't try to "cover" perfectly ... if some of the black plastic shows
thru behind the brown it's actually better ...
Finally - I add some dark 'charcoal' shade around the bearings
(lube boxes).

****

I don't have a "formula" for mixing weathering colors. I use a
few drops of each of black, white, burnt sienna, burnt umber,
dusty yellow, dark green ... etc., etc. etc. ... and mix them to my
whim for the day. The resulting shades are actually highly
-similar- ... but enough different that they "feel right".
One color I never apply/use is that orangey color that Floquil
sold as "rust". There actually is a way that steel/iron will look
that color ... but it doesn't last more than a few hours and is
rarely seen on any RR equipment (never?).
- Jim B.


Re: Weathering Trucks

pennsylvania1954
 

Eric--This may help in your search for a Poly S (and Floquil) replacement for Rail Brown.

Here is a chart from a Model Railroad Hobbyist discussion page with replacements for all your favorite colors:

Floquil Paint to Military Color Conversion Chart V1.2 | Model Railroad Hobbyist magazine | Having fun with model trains | Instant access to model railway resources without barriers

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: KCS "DF" Boxcar

Ed Hawkins
 

thekays100@... [STMFC] wrote:

Good point. I should have been more specific.

The car shown in the photo is a 40' plug door car, painted box car red. The lettering to the left of the door is minimal. Reporting marks "K.C.S." Car Number 1701, and data. Right of the door, a big rectangle with DF inside and the word "insulated" beneath, and the data. The lettering looks like it is white, and all is in Roman Style.
I am lousy at identifying car builders, etc., but this car has a "bowtie" style roof.
Of course, I have no way of knowing if the model is correct!
Stephen,
The description helps. The prototype cars were 5 PS-1 insulated box cars, KCS 1700-1704, built ca. 8-60 with 8' door openings & plug doors. Pullman-Standard built about 223 cars of this general type in July-September 1960 for CGW, KCS, Merchants Despatch (NRBX and NYRX reporting marks), and a single car for Trans-Leasing, TLCX 10. The roof and ends were proprietary components made by Pullman-Standard. Given these box cars were insulated, the PS-1 roof was the Z-U eave design as was typical on insulated box cars and reefers.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Lube markings practices?

Guy Wilber
 

Dennis wrote:

"The "Journal Pac", or references to "lubricators" also came very late in the history of solid bearings, post 1960 IIRC. Both are references to proprietary journal pads rather than loose waste."

AAR approved lubricating devices for plain bearings were required on all new and rebuilt cars as of January 1, 1957. Cars which received heavy repairs (over 100 hours of labor) were subject to the same rule.

Cars so equipped were required to receive a 1-1/2" stenciled block of contrasting color near the original packing or repack stencil. If the trade name of the device was applied to the car it was a requirement to maintain it as well.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: KCS "DF" Boxcar

hubert mask
 

Only offer this car in the 50 version as far as decals

Mask Island Decals .com

Hubert Mask. 


On Feb 8, 2016, at 8:55 PM, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

"I came upon a photo in my files of a model of a 40-foot boxcar with interesting markings. It is a Kansas City Southern car, with "DF" in a rectangle to the right of the door. Since this photo was saved from someone's posted photos from a Prototype Modelers' Show somewhere, I do not feel comfortable posting it here, but I am interested in modeling this car. I have checked the ususal decal sources and cannot find the lettering for this."

"40 ft boxcar model" is really vague. Any other information - car number, type of boxcar? My Carnac the Magnificent imitation is pretty bad.

Ben Hom


Re: KCS "DF" Boxcar

StephenK
 

Good point.   I should have been more specific.

The car  shown in the photo is a 40' plug door car, painted box car red.   The lettering to the left of the door is minimal.   Reporting marks  "K.C.S." Car Number 1701, and data.    Right of the door, a big rectangle with  DF inside and the word "insulated" beneath, and the data.   The lettering looks like it is white, and all is in Roman Style.    

I am lousy at identifying car builders, etc., but this car has a "bowtie" style roof. 

Of course, I have no way of knowing if the model is correct!


S Kay


Re: Odd 4 rivet wide vertical seam boxcar

Riverboy
 

The flat car behind (in front of?) the box car intrigues me as well. An interesting load.

Tod C Dwyer (Ohio)


On Monday, February 8, 2016 8:58 PM, "Schleigh Mike mike_schleigh@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
This car that Gary has asked about appears to be a 1951 rebuilt car from MP 47000 series. The rivet (and stenciling) pattern seems more affected by the blurred image rather than the design.  See RP CYC 14 page 37 for a better image.

Regards----Mike Schleigh  Grove City, Penna


On Monday, February 8, 2016 8:39 PM, "'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
This is a partially blurred picture but the 4 rivet wide vertical seams on the side of the car do stand out as well as the extra width added.  Does anyone recognize this boxcar?
 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock





Re: Odd 4 rivet wide vertical seam boxcar

Schleigh Mike
 

This car that Gary has asked about appears to be a 1951 rebuilt car from MP 47000 series. The rivet (and stenciling) pattern seems more affected by the blurred image rather than the design.  See RP CYC 14 page 37 for a better image.

Regards----Mike Schleigh  Grove City, Penna


On Monday, February 8, 2016 8:39 PM, "'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
This is a partially blurred picture but the 4 rivet wide vertical seams on the side of the car do stand out as well as the extra width added.  Does anyone recognize this boxcar?
 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock



Re: KCS "DF" Boxcar

Benjamin Hom
 

"I came upon a photo in my files of a model of a 40-foot boxcar with interesting markings. It is a Kansas City Southern car, with "DF" in a rectangle to the right of the door. Since this photo was saved from someone's posted photos from a Prototype Modelers' Show somewhere, I do not feel comfortable posting it here, but I am interested in modeling this car. I have checked the ususal decal sources and cannot find the lettering for this."

"40 ft boxcar model" is really vague. Any other information - car number, type of boxcar? My Carnac the Magnificent imitation is pretty bad.


Ben Hom


KCS "DF" Boxcar

StephenK
 

I came upon a photo in my files  of a model of a 40-foot boxcar with interesting markings.   It is a Kansas City Southern car, with "DF" in a rectangle to the right of the door.  Since this photo was saved from someone's posted photos from a Prototype Modelers' Show somewhere, I do not feel comfortable posting it here, but I am interested in modeling this car.   I have checked the ususal decal sources and cannot find the lettering for this.   

I suppose I could piece this together but I would need more info.   Before I go that route I would like to make sure that a decal set doesn't exist.


Does anyone know if these decals are available?



Stephen Kay


Odd 4 rivet wide vertical seam boxcar

gary laakso
 

This is a partially blurred picture but the 4 rivet wide vertical seams on the side of the car do stand out as well as the extra width added.  Does anyone recognize this boxcar?
 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock


Re: Lube markings practices?

Tony Thompson
 

      For those not sure what might be feasible for repack and brake service stencils, with the fine Sunshine sets not available, here is what Richard Hendrickson used to do, back in the day. He used the smallest lettering from N scale data sets, usually upside down just to make sure it wasn't readable. As he observed, the main thing is that there is some relatively fresh lettering on a paint patch, over by the right bolster and on the brake reservoir, not that it necessarily say the right thing. So much of modeling is SUGGESTING what is there, rather than slavishing producing the exact, correct item.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

mopacfirst
 

One more source, not previously mentioned, is the MRS (Monon Railway Supply?) repack sheet.  I bought a set of these, possibly in the late nineties, and I've probably only used one-third of it.

Repack, of course, is in 1" or so letters usually, at least during our time of interest.  So not necessary to be that precise, as long as it looks right.  Reweigh data is in 3" lettering sizes, usually, to match the capacity and light weight data.  None of which, as a rule, was stenciled all that precisely if done with hand-held stencils.

A few railroads, not many, had distinctive repack stenciling.  There was the MoPac style, in which the word REPACKED and the station were curved around the center line containing the date.  You might not be able to read the data but it's recognizable.

Ron Merrick


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

Tony Thompson
 

Ben Hom wrote:

 

Here we go muddying the waters again. While any number of different maintenance procedures can happen when a car is on the rip track or in the shops, please keep in mind that these are distinct requirements. Don't confuse reweighing with repainting or repacking or brake maintenance. Each procedure is recorded with different stencils on the car but may not happen on the same date. This continues to trip up even some of the more expereinced modelers on this list.


    Well said, Ben, and all true. Reweigh is not repack is not brake service.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Tank Car Reporting Marks

Charles Peck
 

And not just painted reporting marks. Many truck side frames had the owning RR
initials cast into the side frames. Who will be the first to model THOSE?  
Not me.....
Chuck Peck in FL

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 4:56 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 




---In STMFC@..., wrote :

Almost all of the have the reporting marks on the frame -
as well as on the left end of the tank.

Is that so they can be identified when the tank leaves the
frame during a wreck? Something else? Is this a 'standard'
and if so when was it introduced and/or repealed?
- Jim B.
============

Yes.

That is actually common on all types of freight cars... Boxcars typically had the reporting marks stenciled inside on the side plate, on the doors (usually on the inside), on the centersill (but normally only on one side), and on the trucks (usually, but not always, on the bolsters.) The whole car could come apart in a wreck, and hopefully all the pieces would end up at home. The centersill stenciling was hard to see, and most often covered with dirt. Those of us who spent time crawling around under work equipment are familiar with these, as they were seldom changed when the car went in work service, and thus were the car's last revenue number.

Dennis Storzek



Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

Benjamin Hom
 

Al Smith wrote:

"If you go to google search and type in Station Reweigh and symbols. Select the steam era sight It will take you to www.steamerafreightcars.com/.../resources/StationandReweighSymbols.pdf That will give you the railroad repair facilities towns and codes."

Here we go muddying the waters again. While any number of different maintenance procedures can happen when a car is on the rip track or in the shops, please keep in mind that these are distinct requirements. Don't confuse reweighing with repainting or repacking or brake maintenance. Each procedure is recorded with different stencils on the car but may not happen on the same date. This continues to trip up even some of the more expereinced modelers on this list.


Ben Hom


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Lube markings practices?

Allan Smith
 

If you go to google search and type in Station Rewiegh and symbols. Select the steam era sight It will take you to www.steamerafreightcars.com/.../resources/StationandReweighSymbols.pdf   That will give you the railroad repair facilities towns and codes.

Those decals were available from Champ as HD-50-53.

Al Smith
Sonora CA


Re: Tank Car Reporting Marks

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <jimbetz@...> wrote :

Almost all of the have the reporting marks on the frame -
as well as on the left end of the tank.

Is that so they can be identified when the tank leaves the
frame during a wreck? Something else? Is this a 'standard'
and if so when was it introduced and/or repealed?
- Jim B.
============

Yes.

That is actually common on all types of freight cars... Boxcars typically had the reporting marks stenciled inside on the side plate, on the doors (usually on the inside), on the centersill (but normally only on one side), and on the trucks (usually, but not always, on the bolsters.) The whole car could come apart in a wreck, and hopefully all the pieces would end up at home. The centersill stenciling was hard to see, and most often covered with dirt. Those of us who spent time crawling around under work equipment are familiar with these, as they were seldom changed when the car went in work service, and thus were the car's last revenue number.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Lube markings practices?

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

 

If you are doing this detail - whose decals are you using and
what are you doing about the -need- for a variety of 'shops' to
use? And do you have some feeling for how many different
'shops' would be needed in order to have an acceptable feel
for "these cars have been serviced away from their home
roads fairly frequently"?


      The many Sunshine decal sets for reweigh symbols also included repack data, as do most Speedwitch sets and newer Microscale sets. Richard Hendrickson was of the opinion, after studying a heck of a lot of prototype photos, that at least of 80 percent of the repacks were from the owning road. But of course the characters are so tiny as to be awfully difficult to read, so I have chosen not to worry about exactly what they say or what date they bear, for most models. And BTW, Richard also believed that repack frequency was approximately annually with solid-bearing trucks.
       Then there are the brake service rules, and the lettering to go with it. That, and repack data, were the subjects of two posts on my blog. If you're interested, here are the links:


The second link shows the recommended lettering content and arrangement, though many photos contradict it.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Tank Car Reporting Marks

Tom Birkett <tnbirke@...>
 

Yes stenciling reporting marks on underframes was a standard going back at least to 1921. Two reasons for this: in case of a derailment when the tank and underframe can get separated and the fact that the tank in those days was not subject to time limits of usage but the underframe was (counter intuitive but that is the way it was and is at least until the 1990s.) I have a good photo of PSPX 13199 showing separate built dates for tank and underframe.

Tom Birkett

Bartlesville, OK





From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 1:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tank Car Reporting Marks





Hi,

While I was looking for repack/lube markings I noticed
something about almost all of the tank cars that I don't
remember hearing talked about before/knowing about.

Almost all of the have the reporting marks on the frame -
as well as on the left end of the tank.

Is that so they can be identified when the tank leaves the
frame during a wreck? Something else? Is this a 'standard'
and if so when was it introduced and/or repealed?
- Jim B.





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