Date   

Re: ANDREWS TRUCKS

Benjamin Hom
 

Bill Pardie asked:
" I got a pair of Accurail Andrews trucks on when I compared them to Tahoe Models trucks I noticed that the distance between the [axles] was slightly greater on the Accurail trucks.  As I am constantly reviewing my completed models as well as those in progress and this discrepancy sort of hit home. I have a completed Westerfield S-40-4 stock car on which the trucks (Accurail) seemed a bit long. This may have been emphasized by the fact that the stock car is a 36' car.

Has anyone else noticed this and just what is the actual [axle] spacing on Andrews trucks?"

You do realize that prototype trucks come in a variety of wheelbases?


Ben Hom
"Axel" is a cop from Detroit...


Re: [EXTERNAL] ANDREWS TRUCKS

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Bill;

Noting that "Andrews" is a type of truck, not a specific manufactured truck, I can provide the following:

The PRR's 2D-F2 "Crown" S.C. (cast steel) "Andrews" truck had a wheelbase of 5'6"
The 2D-F3 "USRA" Andrews truck had the same wheelbase
The 2D-F3a "USRA" Andrews truck also had a 5'6" wheelbase

All of the "Crown" "Andrews" trucks found on PRR hoppers (like H21A), plus F25A flats and H24 hopper, had 5'10" wheelbases
All of the "Crown" "Andrews" trucks found on the G25 and G25A gons had 5'8" wheelbases

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 3:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [STMFC] ANDREWS TRUCKS




I have kept the replies to my questions on the proper trucks not only for my inquiries but for those of others,
You never know when you will need information on a car that you are doing.I was looking at one of Richard
Hendrickson's post the other day in which he had recommended Accurail andrews trucks over all others
for a Santa Fe BX-6 boxcar. His reasoning was the bolster ends. I got a pair of Accurail Andrews trucks
on when I compared them to Tahoe Models trucks I noticed that the didtance between the axels was slightly
greater on the Accurail trucks. As I am constantly reviewing may completed models as well as those in
progress and this discrepancy sort of hit home. I have a completed Westerfield S-40-4 stock car on which the
trucks (Accurail) seemed a bit long. This may have been emphasized by the fact that the stock car is a
36' car.

Has anyone else noticed this and just what is the actual axel spacing on Andrews trucks?

Bill Pardie


ANDREWS TRUCKS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I have kept the replies to my questions on the proper trucks not only for my inquiries but for those of others,
You never know when you will need information on a car that you are doing.I was looking at one of Richard
Hendrickson's post the other day in which he had recommended Accurail andrews trucks over all others
for a Santa Fe BX-6 boxcar. His reasoning was the bolster ends. I got a pair of Accurail Andrews trucks
on when I compared them to Tahoe Models trucks I noticed that the didtance between the axels was slightly
greater on the Accurail trucks. As I am constantly reviewing may completed models as well as those in
progress and this discrepancy sort of hit home. I have a completed Westerfield S-40-4 stock car on which the
trucks (Accurail) seemed a bit long. This may have been emphasized by the fact that the stock car is a
36' car.

Has anyone else noticed this and just what is the actual axel spacing on Andrews trucks?

Bill Pardie


BAR Blueprints Box Car Details on eBay

rwitt_2000
 

Anyone looking for details of 1930s BAR box cars may want to take a look at these items and others from the same seller.

eBay item number: 222032003283

1938 Blueprint Bangor and Aroostook Railroad Camel Sales - All Steel Box Cars

 

1938 Blueprint Bangor and Aroostook Railroad Super Structure Details Box Cars

 



Bob Witt



Re: Palomar Observatory Mirror Blank Delivery 5/12/1936

al_brown03
 

There's a photo of the blank being delivered to Pasadena, in Judith R. Goodstein's book "Millikan's School" (a history of Caltech); the photos are grouped separately from the text, and it's in the second group of photos.


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: sideframe photo

Tony Thompson
 


"Freight cars being maneuvered in a Chicago and Northwestern railroad yard, Chicago, Ill.", Jack Delano, December 1942.

    Thanks to Richard Dermody and Ben Hom for the help. I have some old sideframes and now I know what to do with them . . .

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Palomar Observatory Mirror Blank Delivery 5/12/1936

spsalso
 

From the most excellent book by Ronald Florence:  "The Perfect Machine":


Loaded at Corning on NYC


(through Rochester)

(routed for short distance on DL&W near Buffalo)

(went through Cleveland, Indianapolis, Charleston, Ill.)


To CB&Q at St. Louis


(routed through Cameron Junction, MO)


To ATSF at Kansas City


(detour near Albuquerque) 

(over Cajon Pass)


Deliver at East Pasadena



trip was 14 days, travel only during daylight, max speed 25 mph

load height was almost 18' over rails

railroad cranes were used for loading and unloading at each end--the Santa Fe supplied the 150 ton Barstow crane (load weight 35 tons)


There is a superb photo of a Santa Fe Mike pulling the train here (near the bottom):


Palomar Skies: April 2010



I also found a shot of "most" of the NYC train here:


http://www.kinglyheirs.com/NewYorkStateRailroads/NYStateRailroadIndex.html#.VstSChzxmJk



While wading through the few online photos that I could find, I did find a kupla interesting things.  One is that the NYC well flat had archbar trucks without springing.  You can see a decent photo of the in an adjacent photo to the Santa Fe train I mentioned above.  Imagine.  Hauling a giant piece of glass with no supporting springs.  They must have thought about that option a LOT.


The other thing is here:


Exhibitions | Corning Museum of Glass


If you look at photo #3 in the album series, you see a shot that appears to be the loading of the well flat in Corning.  The problem I'm having is that, while the load appears to be suspended 3' above the car, I don't see anything holding it up.  I see no visual connection between the crane and the lifting frame.  Maybe I'm just (not) seeing things.  But it looks weird to me.



Ed


Edward Sutorik 


Re: DT&I gon - a perspective

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

The basic information that these DT&I gons were BLACK came from Jim Hediger at Model Railroader, whose father worked for DT&I at a time also when son JIm was pretty alert to that railroad's equipment.

I certainly will not argue with documented primary information that they were in fact delivered in BCR. So…either memory is fallible, or…they were repainted black early in life.

But, just why would a railroad repaint a lowly gondola so early in life?

Important questions.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA


Re: sideframe photo

Benjamin Hom
 

Tony Thompson asked:
"Recently someone posted a link to one of the OWI photos (probably John Vachon) in Chicago, with lots of truck sideframes tacked in the foregrund. I must have deleted it by mistake. Can someone send the link again?"

"Freight cars being maneuvered in a Chicago and Northwestern railroad yard, Chicago, Ill.", Jack Delano, December 1942.


Ben Hom


sideframe photo

Tony Thompson
 

Recently someone posted a link to one of the OWI photos (probably John Vachon) in Chicago, with lots of truck sideframes tacked in the foregrund. I must have deleted it by mistake. Can someone send the link again? Thanks in advance.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 2/22/2016 3:53 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Since we are nearly 200 years into the industrial revolution, much stuff has been around for awhile.

I remember using Devcon "Plastic Steel", a steel metal filled 2-ton slow curing epoxy. I found it useful for pigmenting the white 2-ton epoxy, which I used by the case back then, to any shade of gray from near-white to pure black. I found the cured parts to show no noticeable physical difference from the white except for the obvious color change. The regular Devcon White 2-ton epoxy was also a filled epoxy, using fine sized particles of ground ceramic. This ceramic filler was the reason that white Devcon was brutal to micro-twist drill's longevity.

Back then I experimented with weighing underfloors by encapsulating metal weights within the mold with none of the metal exposed-it was 100% encapsulated. This added a bonus; in addition to the added weight, useful for empty gondolas, the thickness of the floor didn't change to accomadate the added weight. I wondered if the differential expansion rates for plastics and metal (both ferrous and non-ferous) would pose a cracking problem. I have examples which are over 20 years old with no apparent problems in both epoxy and polyurethane resins.
-
Andy,

I heard somewhere that Al Westerfield had done something like that with his first resin castings, the dark grey ones from his early days. If I am understanding things correctly, the dark grey resin was quite brittle in addition to dulling drill bits.I think when he moved to Tennessee he changed to a less brittle material, which is why the address on the box is worth checking. I can't swear that my memory is correct, so if someone knows differently, please jump in with a correction.

Spen Kellogg


A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

Andy Carlson
 

Since we are nearly 200 years into the industrial revolution, much stuff has been around for awhile.

I remember using Devcon "Plastic Steel", a steel metal filled 2-ton slow curing epoxy. I found it useful for pigmenting the white 2-ton epoxy, which I used by the case back then, to any shade of gray from near-white to pure black. I found the cured parts to show no noticeable physical difference from the white except for the obvious color change. The regular Devcon White 2-ton epoxy was also a filled epoxy, using fine sized particles of ground ceramic. This ceramic filler was the reason that white Devcon was brutal to micro-twist drill's longevity.

Back then I experimented with weighing underfloors by encapsulating metal weights within the mold with none of the metal exposed-it was 100% encapsulated. This added a bonus; in addition to the added weight, useful for empty gondolas, the thickness of the floor didn't change to accomadate the added weight. I wondered if the differential expansion rates for plastics and metal (both ferrous and non-ferous) would pose a cracking problem. I have examples which are over 20 years old with no apparent problems in both epoxy and polyurethane resins.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "Richard Townsend richtownsend@... [STMFC]"

 
I agree that HGC plastics could be useful for underframes and floors. It has the potential to eliminate the need for weights altogether. I wonder how easy is it to drill in HGC plastic and what glues will work with it for adding details. Perhaps the high cost of HGC plastics is what is holding back manufacturers.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Feb 22, 2016 12:27 pm
Subject: [STMFC] A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

 
The March 2016 issue of the NMRA Magazine (formerly the Bulletin) has a review of Kadee’s HO scale truck with electrical pickup. The article states that the truck are made from a "high gravity compound" plastic material which “weighs nearly the same as metal trucks”.
 
Huh?
 
A Google search produced hits for several companies already in the high gravity compound (HGC) business plus this somewhat technical explanation of the material:
 
 
The Kadee website offers HGC trucks minus the electrical pickup feature. A number of truck styles with either Code 110 standard wheels or Code 88 semi-scale wheels are offered:
 
 
I would think this material is a good option for flatcar frames and car floors.
 
Anyone have experience with HGC in model railroading?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Re: A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

Richard Townsend
 

I agree that HGC plastics could be useful for underframes and floors. It has the potential to eliminate the need for weights altogether. I wonder how easy is it to drill in HGC plastic and what glues will work with it for adding details. Perhaps the high cost of HGC plastics is what is holding back manufacturers.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Feb 22, 2016 12:27 pm
Subject: [STMFC] A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

 
The March 2016 issue of the NMRA Magazine (formerly the Bulletin) has a review of Kadee’s HO scale truck with electrical pickup. The article states that the truck are made from a "high gravity compound" plastic material which “weighs nearly the same as metal trucks”.
 
Huh?
 
A Google search produced hits for several companies already in the high gravity compound (HGC) business plus this somewhat technical explanation of the material:
 
 
The Kadee website offers HGC trucks minus the electrical pickup feature. A number of truck styles with either Code 110 standard wheels or Code 88 semi-scale wheels are offered:
 
 
I would think this material is a good option for flatcar frames and car floors.
 
Anyone have experience with HGC in model railroading?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

Brian Carlson
 

To answer Bob's question. Yes it helps for lightweight cars. Now if they would only update their 2D-F8 truck to HGC.


Brian J. Carlson

On Feb 22, 2016, at 4:26 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Kadee has been producing trucks with this material for at least five =
years, and they mention it in their ads. It's hardly new.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-


Re: A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

Tony Thompson
 

      Kadee has been producing trucks with this material for at least five years, and they mention it in their ads. It's hardly new.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





A New Material: High Gravity Compound Plastic

thecitrusbelt@...
 

The March 2016 issue of the NMRA Magazine (formerly the Bulletin) has a review of Kadee’s HO scale truck with electrical pickup. The article states that the truck are made from a "high gravity compound" plastic material which “weighs nearly the same as metal trucks”.

 

Huh?

 

A Google search produced hits for several companies already in the high gravity compound (HGC) business plus this somewhat technical explanation of the material:

 

http://www.ptonline.com/articles/now-they-want-plastics-to-be-heavy

 

The Kadee website offers HGC trucks minus the electrical pickup feature. A number of truck styles with either Code 110 standard wheels or Code 88 semi-scale wheels are offered:

 

http://www.kadee.com/htmbord/HO-Scale%20Trucks.htm

 

I would think this material is a good option for flatcar frames and car floors.

 

Anyone have experience with HGC in model railroading?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Acid tank car kit upgrade

Eric Hansmann
 

Frank Hodina shares a unique upgrade to a Resin Car Works acid tank car kit. Follow along with his tips on the RCW blog.

 

http://blog.resincarworks.com/cant-leave-stuff-alone/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


SOLD-all spoken for:SP B-50-25 12 panel 40' enhanced boxcar kit

Andy Carlson
 



I am sold out on these 3 kits. I won't have any additional ones until I get some replacement parts.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

  Hello-
I have three enhanced kits of the Southern Pacific's unique 40' 12 panel boxcars built 11-47, class SP B-50-25; SP 21750-22249. Though there were many 100s more of this class built beyond the 500 cars of this sub-series, these cars had both Ajax power brakes and Apex metal running boards which are included in this enhanced kit. (Info from Tony Thompson and Richard Hendrickson in an RMC article in the 1990s).

Intermountain sells an undecorated Great Northern 12 panel box car kit. Correct body, but it has the wrong ends, ladders, roof, running board and doors.

I have this enhanced Intermountain 12 panel box car kit with the following parts:
1 new Intermountain undec 12 panel box car kit
1 pair of the 5/5/5 Interim Improved Youngstown corrugated doors (The Overnight doors) by SouthWest Scale Models.
1 pair of IMRC 3/4 improved Dreadnaught ends with poling pockets
1 IMWX/Red Caboose 1937 AAR 40' Murphy rectangular panel roof
1 IMRC etched metal Apex Tri-Lock running board.
1 additional Intmt 8-rung ladder sprue for the car ends


The SouthWest Scale Models 5/6/5 improved Youngstown doors are cast in injected molded styrene, and are correct for this sub-class SP B-50-25 40' boxcar, . The IMWX/Red Caboose roof is the industries' best '37 AAR panel roof, and fits nicely on the Intermountain body after removing the top of the end-bulkhead by about 1/4 inch with rail nippers.Intermountain made the tooling for the Red Caboose '37 AAR box car and for some strange reason did the roof correctly for IMWX/RC, but incorrectly for their own in-house '37 AAR car.

The extra ladder sprue provides the needed 8-rung end ladders, as the Intermountain set has ladders for the GN 12 panel box cars, and while the GN used 8-rung ladders on the car sides, they used 7-rung ladders for the ends, utilizing a hand grab iron for the 1st step on the ends. With the supplied extra ladders, all 4 ladders are correctly 8-runged.

 Also, the 12 panel kit typically comes with either the R+3/4 IDE, or the 3/4 IDE without poling pockets, neither which is correct. I include the correct end which has poling pockets, which these  GN derived kits never had.  The best decals for these cars is made by Speedwitch models (not included) and the best trucks are Kato A-3 ride controls (not included).


Price is $33, shipping by 1st class air mail included. I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee, I accept PayPal.
Questions should be directed to me OFF-LINE (Please) at
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson















Re: DT&I gon decals

Jason Hill
 

Hey Ted,
I built one of these from P2k gond years ago.... I could use a set of decals for it if one is made.

Jason Hill


Re: group question.

mark_landgraf
 

Coming to you from Albany NY

The layout at Rensselaer Polytec Inst is based on the former Rutland RR. Extensive amounts of their mileage closely replicates‎ many of the cities along the route, at Valuation Map level. These cities include many of the industries in those towns, based on Sanborn maps and historic photos. Prototype operation is standard practice. Original Rutland waybills were used source documents. Contact the Student Union and inquire about the student president of the Model RR Club. 

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network.
From: Mike Bauers mwbauers55@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2016 10:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Reply To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] group question.

 

As technically oriented as this group is, someone may know the answer…..

Does anyone know of a model RR group that is oriented toward prototype RR loads and their modeling?

Can you point me to it?

Thanks !

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi


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