Date   

Re: canopy cement/plastic kit from hell

thmsdmpsy
 

I think you need to clean the mold release from the kit, my felt greasy so that's what I did.  Tom Dempsey, Spokane, WA



Re: The History of Shipping Bulk Cement

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Jim,

There were wooden covered hoppers as early as the 1890s, and special steel cars in the 1920s. Checked my Gregg Cyclopedias: Greenville built small 50-ton hoppers for the Erie in 1934. The PRR H30 car dates from around 1935, as does the B&O N31. There are some other cars that date from the late 1930s like some home-built WM cars from 1937. I see NYC Enterprise cars from 1939, L&NE drop-frame cars from 1938 and the NKP bought AC&F 70-ton cars in 1939. That seems like the watershed year.

Does this help?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 3/3/16 2:03 PM, jimbetz jimbetz@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Hi all,

This thread was born as "Covered Hoppers - for Cement".

Although there have been a few posts on the referenced thread
this part of my question has gone essentially unanswered ...

What I'm looking for is the kind of -general- historical information
that covers questions such as

1) When were cement hoppers commonly in use (as opposed
to the earliest experiments - which I know about )?

2) Was I wrong in my general statements about how far -most-
bulk cement was moved in covered hoppers?

All - I am not talking about concrete - I'm interested in the
bulk cement hauls (before, during, and after the transition to
using 'dedicated service' covered hoppers).
At least one thing I learned from the prior thread was about
the use of "bulk containers in gons" in the early days. Thanks
for that detail/piece of information.
- Jim B.



Re: The History of Shipping Bulk Cement

Ray Breyer
 

Common? Mid to late 1930s. The AMC roads were buying them as-needed to cover increased concrete production for WPA projects all over the Great Lakes region. They were also converting plain hoppers into LOs for the same traffic.
 
The Nickel Plate started converting USRA twins into covered hoppers, and by 1936 had converted 40 of them to dry cement cars (and another 19 for dolomite or soda ash). They bought 50 new LOs in 1937 and 1939 for cement service. The W&LE bought 13 LOs new for cement service in 1937. The C&O and PM did the same thing, but I don't have those numbers in front of me. Several Midwestern roads, especially the IC and Rock Island, also bought new ACF-built covered hoppers for cement service before WWII.

Ray Breyer 
 Elgin, IL



From: "jimbetz jimbetz@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, March 3, 2016 1:03 PM
Subject: [STMFC] The History of Shipping Bulk Cement

Hi all,

  This thread was born as "Covered Hoppers - for Cement".

    Although there have been a few posts on the referenced thread
this part of my question has gone essentially unanswered ...

  What I'm looking for is the kind of -general- historical information
that covers questions such as

    1) When were cement hoppers commonly in use (as opposed
          to the earliest experiments - which I know about )?

    2) Was I wrong in my general statements about how far -most-
          bulk cement was moved in covered hoppers?

  All - I am not talking about concrete - I'm interested in the
bulk cement hauls (before, during, and after the transition to
using 'dedicated service' covered hoppers).
  At least one thing I learned from the prior thread was about
the use of "bulk containers in gons" in the early days.  Thanks
for that detail/piece of information.
                        - Jim B.


------------------------------------
Posted by: jimbetz <jimbetz@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    STMFC-digest@...
    STMFC-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    STMFC-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/




Re: Northern Pacific gondola pics please

Tim O'Connor
 


It's CENTRAL Washington -- think Yakima and Ellensburg





As Tim said lot's of beet growing in Southwest Washington including the Walla Walla Valley Railway using NP gondolas.

    Wouldn't that be southEASTERN Washington? Or am I missing something?

Tony Thompson 


Re: The History of Shipping Bulk Cement

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

1) When were cement hoppers commonly in use (as opposed to the earliest experiments - which I know about )?


      Right after the end of World War II, many railroads were buying covered hoppers, the great majority for cement. See the recent issues of RPC for more info.

2) Was I wrong in my general statements about how far -most-bulk cement was moved in covered hoppers?


       No.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





The History of Shipping Bulk Cement

Jim Betz
 

Hi all,

This thread was born as "Covered Hoppers - for Cement".

Although there have been a few posts on the referenced thread
this part of my question has gone essentially unanswered ...

What I'm looking for is the kind of -general- historical information
that covers questions such as

1) When were cement hoppers commonly in use (as opposed
to the earliest experiments - which I know about )?

2) Was I wrong in my general statements about how far -most-
bulk cement was moved in covered hoppers?

All - I am not talking about concrete - I'm interested in the
bulk cement hauls (before, during, and after the transition to
using 'dedicated service' covered hoppers).
At least one thing I learned from the prior thread was about
the use of "bulk containers in gons" in the early days. Thanks
for that detail/piece of information.
- Jim B.


Re: Northern Pacific gondola pics please

railsnw@...
 

Whoop's, yeah you are right. Not many sugar beets growing in the timber lands in southwest Washington :)

Rich


Re: Northern Pacific gondola pics please

Tony Thompson
 

As Tim said lot's of beet growing in Southwest Washington including the Walla Walla Valley Railway using NP gondolas.


    Wouldn't that be southEASTERN Washington? Or am I missing something?

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Online Shippers Guides

Tony Thompson
 

Allen Montgomery wrote:

 
I purchased the '38 UP guide from an outfit called Rails Unlimited out of Elgin, Illinois. Mostly midwest roads, but reasonably priced.
__
 
That's the source I originally recommended. Very good reproduction, fair prices. It's at:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Brad Andonian
 

Fellas,

The NYC had a plethora of gondolas with acf cement cannisters.    Bill Davis offers them in ho; I have a good number in O from Rich Yoder and Robert Parri.

Here is a link:
These cars ran from the Bethlehem cement district to the jersey side of the Hudson River.     Many were carfloated into NYC for distribution.
Brad Andonian

PS: there is a post on this in the files somewhere!


Re: Northern Pacific gondola pics please

railsnw@...
 

As Tim said lot's of beet growing in Southwest Washington including the Walla Walla Valley Railway using NP gondolas.

As to Caswell gondolas, SP&S bought used ones from ATSF and converted them to wood chip cars.

Rich Wilkens


Re: canopy cement/plastic kit from hell

 

I used Testor’s liquid cement on mine.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 10:27 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] canopy cement/plastic kit from hell







I'm not surprised Central Valley had only one injection molded freight car kit.



The parts are very nice but getting them together is a lot of work. The plastic is hard to cut/sand. Plastruct solvent cement works, but evaporates almost immediately.



Neither Ambroid or Duco cement held the parts I had to fiddle with. Trying everything I could think of (even took out the dreaded tube of Goo) I tried Pacer canopy cement and it worked like a charm.



Used the canopy cement to put on the roof walk and it worked great.



I just hope the canopy cement paints OK, unlike white glue.



That plastic would be good for stirrup steps. It's definitely not ordinary styrene.



Ed Mines


canopy cement/plastic kit from hell

ed_mines
 

I'm not surprised Central Valley had only one  injection molded freight car kit.


The parts are very nice but getting them together is a lot of work. The plastic is hard to cut/sand. Plastruct solvent cement works, but evaporates almost immediately.


Neither Ambroid or Duco cement held the parts I had to fiddle with. Trying everything I could think of (even took out the dreaded tube of Goo) I tried Pacer canopy cement and it worked like a charm.


Used the canopy cement to put on the roof walk and it worked great.


I just hope the canopy cement paints OK, unlike white glue.


That plastic would be good for stirrup steps. It's definitely not ordinary styrene.


Ed Mines


Re: Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Clark Propst
 

Asked my friend today what the percentages of box cars to cover hoppers were. His answer was “When?” When he started as a car sealer in 52 it was almost all box cars. This gradually changes to mostly covered hoppers.
 
He reminisced about the 100 car days when they we so busy they wouldn’t get a lunch break. Box cars were the worst, he had to climb in the car and count the bags then close both doors and seal them. He had to climb on every covered hopper and seal each hatch.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :

Are shaker brackets a common feature of covered hoppers used for cement?
================

They have been for a long time, but a look through the 1940 CBC shows nary a shaker bracket anywhere. The 1946 shows them on a few cars.

Before shaker brackets could become a standard item, someone had to make a car shaker (actually vibrators.)  I suspect it took a while to realize the need, as there wasn't a problem until powdered materials began to be shipped in bulk, and I'm sure it took a bit longer for a standard pattern to evolve. I'm a little surprised I didn't find illustrations of the brackets in the '46 CBC.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [EXTERNAL] a gondola question

Dennis Storzek
 

I just spent some time paging through the 1946 CBC looking at gondola floors... this question came to mind when I was doing the steel floor for the Accurail 40' gon. None of the general arrangement drawings have drain holes called out. SOME of the general arrangement drawings show little circles, the size of rivets, in places where there in nothing for a rivet to fasten, so I suspect they are drain holes, 1" dia or so. If I would have had the steel details drawing for the ACL gon the Accurail kit follows, it might have shown drain holes somewhere, but since I didn't, and they weren't shown on the general arrangement drawing, I didn't put them in. They'd be pretty small; a #80 drill is already a scale 1-3/16" in diameter.

Dennis Storzek


Re: D&RW 6500 Series Flat Car

rwitt_2000
 

Thanks. - Bob Witt


Re: D&RW 6500 Series Flat Car

Roland Levin
 

Hi Bob,

The D&RGW6500 flat cars are narrow gauge cars. They were used until the end of the narrow gauge traffic in 1968 and some of them are still in use for the tourist operations Cumbres and Toltec/Durango Silverton.

 

This is information from this webpage: http://drgw.free.fr/DRGW/Freight/Flatcar/Plat_en.htm

Between 1940 and 1944, the Denver & Rio Grande Western shops converted 45 42ft long steel frame standard gauge fishbelly gondolas, into narrow gauge flat cars with a capacity of 40 tons and numbered between 6500 and 6544. These cars equipped with Bettendorf trucks remained in service until the end of freight operations on the D&RGW narrow gauge in 1968. Fourteen of these flat cars are now on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad and fourteen other, converted to passenger cars, are used on the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad.

 

Best regards

 

Roland Levin

Stockholm, Sweden

http://hem.bredband.net/drgw/

http://www.usms.se

 

 

 

Från: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Skickat: den 3 mars 2016 15:36
Till: STMFC@...
Ämne: [STMFC] D&RW 6500 Series Flat Car

 

 

Group:

I search the archives but found no information about the D&RW 6500 flat car illustrated in this drawing currently on eBay.  The notes on the drawing cite 26" wheels and both "Bettendorf" and arch bar trucks.

They seem to be an example of an early all-steel flat car.


Bob Witt
1965 Rio Grande Western 40' Steel Flatcar Blueprint  Drawing by Ken Pruitt nr

1965 Rio Grande Western 40' Steel Flatcar Blueprint Drawing by Ken Pruitt nr

 

 


Re: Online Shippers Guides

Allen Montgomery
 

I purchased the '38 UP guide from an outfit called Rails Unlimited out of Elgin, Illinois. Mostly midwest roads, but reasonably priced.
Allen


On Tuesday, March 1, 2016 7:53 AM, "Ray Breyer rtbsvrr69@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 

>Great resource for Midwestern roads. There don't seem to be any for the Rust Belt, the southwest, or south of the Ohio. 
>Are there other sources for those areas?
>Alex Schneider 


Well, there are several on Google Books and HathiTrust:



And this is just the railroad-specific, low-hanging fruit. There are national directories, industry-specific directories, state-specific directories, and Federal summaries of industries across specific regions. There's LOTS of information online if you're willing to actually dig a little. Do keep in mind that these are all "public domain" resources, so it helps if you model before 1925.   :-)

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



D&RW 6500 Series Flat Car

rwitt_2000
 

Group:

I search the archives but found no information about the D&RW 6500 flat car illustrated in this drawing currently on eBay.  The notes on the drawing cite 26" wheels and both "Bettendorf" and arch bar trucks.

They seem to be an example of an early all-steel flat car.


Bob Witt
1965 Rio Grande Western 40' Steel Flatcar Blueprint  Drawing by Ken Pruitt nr

1965 Rio Grande Western 40' Steel Flatcar Blueprint Drawing by Ken Pruitt nr



42681 - 42700 of 183558