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Re: Shipping Bulk Cement: A Few More National Statistics

rwitt_2000
 

The B&OHS has several document about specialized cars including LO. The one from the early 1950s shows that most covered hoppers were in assigned service and not in pool service. So these cars traveled between the source of the load and one of the customer facilities. One could assume the customer wanted the shortest possible route.

Bob Witt


Re: Shipping Bricks

Gary Ray
 

 

 

Thanks to everyone who replied.  Really appreciate this group and their expertise.

Gary Ray


Re: Monon gondola spiral ends - the Shops

Michael Aufderheide
 

Richard,

Paul is correct that the Shops was the name of Chad's Monon model business.  As a Monon modeler myself, I benefited a great deal from his creativity and I have too many of his kits to count.  Chad did offer the spiral ends to retrofit the Intermountain USRA gon.  I have a few pairs, but the part was rather thick as a resin casting.  After seeing Jack Burgess's clinic at Naperville last year, I was inspired to 3D model the ends and have Shapeways print them.  You can see them here if you want a set:

Monon Spiral Gondola End by MononInMonon on Shapeways

 

The price is the direct cost from them, I haven't marked it up. The material is very thin and strong, sort of like a thin guitar pick.


Regards,


Mike Aufderheide


End of car details

Eric Hansmann
 

How much do we model end of car details? The latest Resin Car Works blog post has tips and photos to illustrate the possibilities. 

http://blog.resincarworks.com/end-sill-details/


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


Re: Shipping Bulk Cement: A Few More National Statistics

Ted Culotta
 

It could be a function of the utility of the covered hopper. If I (meaning a railroad) invest in a car that is specialized in nature, it's likely done with the intent of serving my customers' needs, which are online and thereby shorter haul in nature and also, quite possibly, in bulk. Box cars could be used for "finished" (bagged) shipments that are not as customer-specific in nature. Every hardware store needs bagged cement, but only a small number of customers need or want a covered hopper's worth. Each customer receives the cement in a way that suits their needs.

Cheers
Ted Culotta


PFE Book

rob.mclear3@...
 

Hi to all


There is a copy of the PFE freight car book by Tony Thompson and others on ebay now.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pacific-Fruit-Express-PFE-Second-Ed-2003-Thompson-Church-Jones-FINE-/111928085527?hash=item1a0f6f0c17:g:3lgAAOSwqrtWoUCq


This is an outstanding work and I have a copy already, for me it is one of the must have reference series of books if you are into freight car modelling.   Good Luck.  No association with the seller or the Authors just passing this on for info


Rob McLear

Aussie.



Re: Monon gondola spiral ends - the Shops

Paul
 

Hi Richard,

 

‘The Shops’ were kits from Chad Boas if I recall correctly.  Chad has a price list on the Resincarworks site, but the ends (Van Dorn?) are not listed.  You may be able to contact Chad from the addresses on the price list.  See;

http://resincarworks.com/boas_kitlist_201506.pdf

 

Regards,

 

Paul Nitz.

 

 

 

Several years ago Mont Switzer had an article in MM about building the Monon's USRA-style gondolas. He used ends on the car representing the spiral stamped ends the prototype had. They (the model ends) were  from "The Shops." Does "The Shops" still exist or are the ends available elsewhere?

 

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR


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Re: Union Pacific Freight Cars 1936-51 - paperback

Tony Thompson
 

Brian Carlson wrote:

 
Terry Metcalfe’s groundbreaking book is available on eBay for a very good price. About half what I paid for my copy. If you don’t have it and you’re a freight car person you need to buy it. 

    Full agreement with Brian. This is the book that was the model for the PFE book, and inspired me to write the SP freight car volumes. It's a foundation.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Shipping Bulk Cement: A Few More National Statistics

Tim O'Connor
 


Charles I wonder if this relatively short haul has something to do
with the high revenue per loaded car mile? In other words the revenue
per car LOAD may not be much, even if per MILE it was higher than average.

Tim O'Connor




- LO loads were really short line hauls while box car loads were a little more dispersed in terms of distance traveled.  Again from 1952, these data are typical:

1-49 miles  458 box cars, 376 LO
50-99 miles  799 box cars, 672 LO
100-199 miles  1217 box cars, 802 LO
200-399 miles  800 box cars, 381 LO

Charles Hostetler
Washington Ill.


Monon gondola spiral ends - the Shops

Richard Townsend
 

Several years ago Mont Switzer had an article in MM about building the Monon's USRA-style gondolas. He used ends on the car representing the spiral stamped ends the prototype had. They (the model ends) were  from "The Shops." Does "The Shops" still exist or are the ends available elsewhere?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: Shipping Bricks

SUVCWORR@...
 

The Patton Clay Manufacturing Company located in Patton, Pennsylvania on the Cresson Secondary of the Pennsylvania Railroad shipped paving bricks in boxcars on pallets with straw between the layers and between the pallets.  They also shipped clay pipe similarly sans the straw.  

Rich Orr




Re: Shipping Bricks

rwitt_2000
 

FWIW in the early 1960s I observed a box car with a load of bricks loaded the same manner with straw between layers. The car was spotted on the depot's team track, the Soo LIne in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and was being unloaded by one young man, my age, using brick tongs. I can't recall how many layers of bricks were in the car. It doesn't take too many layers to reach the load limit.

Bob Witt


Re: Shipping Bricks

Douglas Harding
 

Gary the AAR published two Pamphlets related to loading brick in closed cars, including diagrams.

 

No. 6 Methods for Loading, Bracing and Blocking Carload Shipments of Brick and Hollow Building Tile in closed cars.

Issued Dec 1936, Revised Dec 1941

 

No. 7 Methods for Loading, Bracing and Blocking Carload Shipments of Hot Top Brick in Closed cars.

Issued March 1937, Revised Jan 1942

 

Both show the brick or tile stack in the cars with no  pallets or packing materials. Bricks were loaded tight, with soldier rows to keep brick from moving. They were stacked in level full layers, no loose bricks allowed. Fibreboard was preferred over excelsior, straw or hay for protecting the load. Bricks were to be loaded lengthwise, stack on edge, for minimal breakage. Metal ties or bands were used to keep the load from shifting. Wood lath, gates and bulkheads were also used to hold the load in place, esp in doorways. Hollow building tile was packed tight with straw or hay to protect.

 

Brick was normally loaded in boxcars, but stockcars were also used. Special carrying tools and handcarts are used to move brick by hand. The tongs can be a clamp type http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/312PF0NBWEL.jpg  or I have seen a handle with two long tines that slip into the holes of a brick enabling a workman to pick up 6-8 brick at a time in each hand. The carts are two designs. One looks like a wheel barrow with a flat bottom and large end, bricks were stacked one at a time, or in groups using the tongs. The other cart design looks like a two wheel hand cart, with a wide flat surface and two pegs stick out near the bottom. You slid the pegs in holes of the bottom bricks in a stack, then tip back and you had a the full stack ready to move.

 

Some info and photos at: http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.mcnear.html

A modern brick trolley, early ones were wood http://www.easyrollmh.com.au/products/hand-trucks/wbtc200/

A brick barrow http://www.jescraft.com/bb.html

Here is a photo of a mason using a brick hod to carry brick http://cache1.asset-cache.net/gc/HN6897-001-shoulder-lift-gettyimages.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=Hl4Z6b3r8gXirEY9qSi%2FpXGR8Bs1tXNsCi9whYi3zSq085ws9tf5ePlYQmD9nfed

 

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Shipping Bulk Cement: A Few More National Statistics

Charles Hostetler
 

These are a few more observations from the national 1% carload waybill sample that I thought were interesting before starting to tabulate the state-to-state statistics.


-  the 1951 - 1953 Canadian/Mexican Supplement did not find any shipments of cement that originated in Canada or Mexico (and terminating in the US)


-  The data show that the shipments are fairly seasonal.  Throughout the mid-1950s about 2/3 of the shipments were in the second and third quarters (April through September).


-  LOs were heavy loads (70 ton car typically), while box cars loads varied over a broader weight range.  These data from 1952 are typical:


<10k lbs  0 box cars, 0 LOs

10k-19k  0 box cars, 0 LOs

20k-29k  0 box cars, 0 LOs

30k-39k  0 box cars, 0 LOs

40k-49k  62 box cars, 0 LOs

50k-59k  1139 box cars, 1 LOs

60k-69k  542 box cars, 1 LOs

70k-79k  587 box cars, 1 LOs

80k-89k  284 box cars, 4 LOs

90k-99k  634 box cars, 50 LOs

>100k lbs  282 box cars, 2279 LOs



- LO loads were really short line hauls while box car loads were a little more dispersed in terms of distance traveled.  Again from 1952, these data are typical:


1-49 miles  458 box cars, 376 LO

50-99 miles  799 box cars, 672 LO

100-199 miles  1217 box cars, 802 LO

200-399 miles  800 box cars, 381 LO

400-599 miles  152 box cars, 74 LO

600-999 miles  78 box cars, 28 LO

1000 - 1399 miles  18 box cars, 2 LO

1400-1999 miles 7 box cars, 1 LO

2000 - 2999 miles 1 box car, 0 LO

>3000 miles no shipments in sample



Charles Hostetler

Washington Ill.



Re: Union Pacific Freight Cars Mechanical Design Drawings (Metcalfe)

waynewhitlow
 

Scott, Ted,

I have that set of drawings.  They are actual UP design drawings.

Wayne Whitlow

On Mar 6, 2016, at 3:58 PM, Ted Culotta speedwitchmedia@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

The following is referenced on the UPHS website. Does anyone out there have this set of drawings? Is it actual mechanical drawings like blueprints or just line drawings as in a diagram book? Thanks in advance.

  • Union Pacific Freight Cars Mechanical Design Drawings
    Metcalfe Publications, Englewood, Colo. Eight sheets in envelope. G-50-13, B-50-24 & 27, B-50-41, A-50-18, A-50-14, A-50-19, CH-70-1, HK-50-5, HK-70-1, HK-50-4, S-40-12, G-50-11, O-50-6, F-50-10, G-70-1, CA-3 and 4.
Cheers,
Ted
--



Re: Shipping Bricks

water.kresse@...
 

I believe they were shipped on the Hocking Valley Rr in box cars separated by straw.  Al Kresse


From: "'Gary Ray' gerber1926@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, March 6, 2016 8:22:51 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Shipping Bricks

 

I am planning a brickworks on my layout and was wondering how what type of rail transportation would be used in the 1920’s.  Were bricks hand stacked in cars?  What type of stabilization?  Unloading?  I know labor was cheap – sure sounds like hard work.

Any information would be greatly appreciated,

Gary Ray



Re: Shipping Bricks

Gary Ray
 

I am planning a brickworks on my layout and was wondering how what type of rail transportation would be used in the 1920’s.  Were bricks hand stacked in cars?  What type of stabilization?  Unloading?  I know labor was cheap – sure sounds like hard work.

Any information would be greatly appreciated,

Gary Ray


Union Pacific Freight Cars 1936-51 - paperback

Brian Carlson
 

Terry Metcalfe’s groundbreaking book is available on eBay for a very good price. About half what I paid for my copy. If you don’t have it and you’re a freight car person you need to buy it. No association with the seller, just saw the auction.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Union-Pacific-Freight-Cars-1936-51-paperback-/231862718666?hash=item35fc1850ca:g:rmoAAOSwoudW1i-H

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 


Shipping Bulk Cement: Car Types

Charles Hostetler
 

These are the distribution of cars types for carload cement shipments from 1947 through 1960:


Year X R S G H F L T
1947 3,628 3 14 22 44 1 801 0
1948







1949 4,183 1 0 1 5 0 1,551 0
1950 4,054 31 1 1 1 0 1,868 0
1951 3,553 0 0 0 3 0 2,144 0
1952 3,530 0 0 0 1 0 2,336 0
1953 3,379 0 0 0 0 0 2,446 0
1954 3,234 0 0 1 0 0 2,693 0
1955







1956 2,991 0 0 0 2 4 3,428 0
1957 2,458 0 0 0 0 1 3,062 0
1958 2,516 0 0 0 6 0 3,309 0
1959 2,246 0 0 0 0 0 3,546 0
1960 1,710 0 0 0 1 0 2,899 0


The type L (Special) includes both the LG (container gons) and the LO (covered hopper) used to ship bulk cement.  In 1947, one in every four or five shipments was in a special type.  By 1955 or 1956 it was more like 1 to 1, and from 1957 on special types were used more frequently than box cars for bulk shipments of cement.  


Charles Hostetler

Washington Ill.



Re: SOLD OUT of Bx-44 kits for now

naptownprr
 

Hi Andy,

 

I accidentally deleted your last email to me, so I lost your street address (or is it a PO box?)  Please resend.  Thanks.

 

Jim Hunter


From: STMFC@... on behalf of Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC]
Sent: Friday, March 4, 2016 10:44 PM
To: yahoogroups
Subject: [STMFC] SOLD OUT of Bx-44 kits for now
 
 

Hi-
I had enough components for 5 kits and they are all spoken for. I have more parts in the pipeline to replace the components necessary for more Bx-44 kits. I will notify the ones who requested a kit plus when I have them restocked I will post to this list.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

56121 - 56140 of 197081