Date   

Re: What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

Douglas Harding
 

I use to save kit boxes, until the basement flooded and I lost many of them. Now like others I use them to hold parts, for support, etc. or toss. I found the Accurail boxes, when cut in half and glued to the fascia make great holders for my carcards during op sessions. Some boxes are saved for holding finished cars. But most of my cars now go into large flat boxes that hold a number of cars, which I purchased from Uline. http://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-3189/Literature-Mailers/23-x-13-x-2-1-2-White-Literature-Mailers

 

Those who know me, know I move often. The right boxes make packing and moving much easier. The Uline boxes stack very nicely into a 4.5 cube packing box. They also sit on a shelf making it easy to select a box marked “hoppers” to find a certain car or cars for a train. I use strips cut from soft foam sheets to separate and protect the cars.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

np328
 

    The empty boxes come in handy again after you the former owner passes away and friends help the surviving widow or children with the railroad estate.  

    The empty boxes depending on the maker of the car, also help speed up things by establishing pricing guidelines for the estate sale. The resin cars will sell for prices comparable to what resin cars should. The other cars will get your survivors better money than if cars are wrapped in paper towels and set in a plastic sack.

This may strike some as morbid however after helping several widows and children over the past few years, there is much to support keeping the boxes - if possible.
                                                                                                                 Jim Dick - St Paul.
                                                                                                         


Re: What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

Paul Koehler
 

Charles:

 

Trash

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:57 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

 

 

Say guys, this is not an earth shaking question but....what do most of you do with your boxes after the freight (or other) car is built?   I realize that they would be nice to have in case you wanted to sell a car, but I have over 225 empty boxes and they are taking up too much room.  What say ye ?

 

Charles Etheredge

Modeling the TNO in the 40's


Re: What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

Eric Hansmann
 

I use several as parts storage. A self stick label goes over the end and a Sharpie is used to mark up the contents; freight car doors, specific kit parts (eg Red caboose X29), Tahoe trucks, K brake systems, hopper loads, spare decal bits, etc.

 

I also use boxes at the paint booth. They are the base for a model stand made with blue Styrofoam shapes. An image at the bottom of this page illustrates the use.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2015/08/06/simple-tools/

 

Another paint shop use is to cut a cradle in the two long sides so a box or freight car can rest upside down to paint. Lots of resin kits call for gluing the floor in place before adding last details. Using the box as a cradle to paint the underframe works well. Just don’t paint too far up the sides towards the area where the car rests on the cradle.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 3:57 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

 




Say guys, this is not an earth shaking question but....what do most of you do with your boxes after the freight (or other) car is built?   I realize that they would be nice to have in case you wanted to sell a car, but I have over 225 empty boxes and they are taking up too much room.  What say ye ?

 

Charles Etheredge

Modeling the TNO in the 40's



Re: What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

Pierre Oliver
 

I keep mine in cartons in the furnace room.
The day I toss them is the day I move again.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/07/16 5:57 PM, ceth512@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Say guys, this is not an earth shaking question but....what do most of you do with your boxes after the freight (or other) car is built?   I realize that they would be nice to have in case you wanted to sell a car, but I have over 225 empty boxes and they are taking up too much room.  What say ye ?


Charles Etheredge

Modeling the TNO in the 40's



What to do with empty rolling stock boxes

Charles Etheredge
 

Say guys, this is not an earth shaking question but....what do most of you do with your boxes after the freight (or other) car is built?   I realize that they would be nice to have in case you wanted to sell a car, but I have over 225 empty boxes and they are taking up too much room.  What say ye ?


Charles Etheredge

Modeling the TNO in the 40's


Re: Help with paint and lettering of WIF boxcars

Bill Welch
 

Just curious Barry, what is the problem w/the roof in the Sunshine HPT&D/WIF kits?

Bill Welch


Re: Railroad paint subsitutes?

qmp211
 

Fred & All,

You have to dig but you can find a lot of cross reference 'guide' information from this list.

Randy Danniel


Floquil Paint to Military Color Conversion Chart V1.2 from Model Railroad Hobbyist
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/14152

Revell Germany Paint Cross Reference Guide to Testors, Pollyscale, Modelmaster
http://downloads.hobbico.com/misc/rmx/TES_Revell_Paint_Match_Guide.pdf

Humbrol Wallchart and online Paint Reference Selector
http://www.humbrol.com/us-en/converthumbrol

Vallejo Equivalent Values
http://cdn.acrylicosvallejo.com/0049261608364909a238add9b4a53745/CC073-rev05.pdf

Scale Model Paint Charts
http://scalemodeldb.com/paintcharts/vallejo

Model Paint Cross Reference Charts
http://www.shapeshift.bg/paintconversionlinks.html

'The Ultimate Paint Conversion Chart'
http://www.paint4models.com/


Re: Help with paint and lettering of WIF boxcars

Benjamin Hom
 

Garth Groff wrote:
"There is a color photo of WIF 314 on page 43 of John Henderson's CLASSIC FREIGHT CARS, volume 1. It is nice brick red. There is no date in the cutline, but it probably is from the late 1950s. The source is Bob's Photos."

No date? No problem - the captions in that series of books are useless anyway.


Ben Hom


Re: Help with paint and lettering of WIF boxcars

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Fenton,

There is a color photo of WIF 314 on page 43 of John Henderson's CLASSIC FREIGHT CARS, volume 1. It is nice brick red. There is no date in the cutline, but it probably is from the late 1950s. The source is Bob's Photos.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



On 3/7/16 11:57 AM, srrfan1401@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Trying to do a few West India Fruit boxcars.  Does anyone know the paint color of the early car(looks like a Pennsy X-29) with the round logo?  Also a second car (Like Speedwitch ex Erie cars) with the steamship logo. This logo has ha straight bow on the ship.  Apparently they changed to a more modern slanted bow in the mid 1950's but I don't know for sure.  Also the cars were painted green at least one in 1957.  Can anyone shed light on these WIF car colors and lettering schemes.

Thanking all in advance for help

Fenton Wells




Re: spiral gondola ends (was Monon gondola spiral ends)

Tim O'Connor
 


These ends are not only good for the Monon. The Soo Line had composite
gondolas with these ends (e.g. SOO #64341) as well.

Tim O'Connor






Richard,

Paul is correct that the Shops was the name of Chad's Monon model business.  As a Monon modeler myself, I benefited a great deal from his creativity and I have too many of his kits to count.  Chad did offer the spiral ends to retrofit the Intermountain USRA gon.  I have a few pairs, but the part was rather thick as a resin casting.  After seeing Jack Burgess's clinic at Naperville last year, I was inspired to 3D model the ends and have Shapeways print them.  You can see them here if you want a set:

Monon Spiral Gondola End by MononInMonon on Shapeways


Re: Shipping Bricks

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <tony@...> wrote :
     Both in steelmaking and other industries using refractory brick, there are numerous kinds, and they all have different looks.
===========

And the pertinent point for modelers is they all came from different places. Same with architectural face brick. While common brick was chosen strictly on cost, and tended to be locally produced, to the point where all the buildings in a large city tended to have the same color brick,  face brick was chosen for color and/or texture, and was shipped longer distances; if white brick was desired, it had to come from an area that had clean white clay; other colors were similar. Being a premium product, it warranted the extra expense in handling, at one time being loaded by hand and the layers packed with straw or other padding.

Dennis Storzek






Re: Shipping Bricks

Tony Thompson
 

Elden Gatwood wrote:

 

The steel industry and foundries all over the country used vast quantities of refractory (oven bricks). Since they were valuable, they were usually shipped on pallets bound in place with metal banding, but in your time perhaps rope. They could be any color, but the ones I saw were a very dark red/black, slightly metallic color.


     Both in steelmaking and other industries using refractory brick, there are numerous kinds, and they all have different looks. Silica brick can be gray to almost golden, chrome brick can be dark gray to dark brown, magnesia brick are various light colors depending on composition, and so on. I'm not saying Elden is wrong in what he says, only that there is a great deal more to the topic if you wish to depict pallets of such brick.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






9F 2-10-0

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

On a preserved railway




Sent from Samsung mobile


Re: [resinfreightcars] PFE Book

Tony Thompson
 

Rob McLear wrote:

 

There is a copy of the PFE book by Tony Thompson and others on e-Bay now, I have a copy of this and it is an outstanding work and one of the ultimate reference series of books that you need when modelling freight cars. 


     I should point out that the book is still in print and a new copy can be obtained by on-line secure ordering at www.signaturepress.com with free shipping within the U.S.

Full disclosure: I am a partner in the publishing company.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Help with paint and lettering of WIF boxcars

Barry Bennett
 

I am working on one of the Speedwitch cars at the moment. I am going with a rich oxide red colour (actually Triumph Russet Brown) and am going to use decals from FECRS. There is also a dry transfer set available from Clover House. The only photo I know of, and which is included by Ted in the kit, has the tone of ROR paint, and 5 years of grime should sort out any nit pickers.

I think it is well established that different ships were depicted on various iterations of boxcars depending on what was in service at the time the cars were built/obtained. There is a lot of previous posts on here, including the ex-HPT&D (not X29) cars, which you can't model as there is no roof available.

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.

On Mon, Mar 7, 2016 at 4:57 PM, srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Trying to do a few West India Fruit boxcars.  Does anyone know the paint color of the early car(looks like a Pennsy X-29) with the round logo?  Also a second car (Like Speedwitch ex Erie cars) with the steamship logo. This logo has ha straight bow on the ship.  Apparently they changed to a more modern slanted bow in the mid 1950's but I don't know for sure.  Also the cars were painted green at least one in 1957.  Can anyone shed light on these WIF car colors and lettering schemes.

Thanking all in advance for help

Fenton Wells




Help with paint and lettering of WIF boxcars

O Fenton Wells
 

Trying to do a few West India Fruit boxcars.  Does anyone know the paint color of the early car(looks like a Pennsy X-29) with the round logo?  Also a second car (Like Speedwitch ex Erie cars) with the steamship logo. This logo has ha straight bow on the ship.  Apparently they changed to a more modern slanted bow in the mid 1950's but I don't know for sure.  Also the cars were painted green at least one in 1957.  Can anyone shed light on these WIF car colors and lettering schemes.

Thanking all in advance for help

Fenton Wells



Re: Shipping Bulk Cement: A Few More National Statistics

ed_mines
 

I don't see how covered hoppers would be used in general service unless the customer didn't mind having his load contaminated by the previous load.

 Cement would particularly be a problem to clean out since it sets up with water.



Re: Shipping Bricks

Dennis Storzek
 

A couple observations from the Chicago area in the fifties, sixties, and seventies:

Dad was a carpenter, so I had early exposure to construction sites, and keenly watched what was going on in the neighborhood, which was just finishing building out.

In the fifties and sixties, common brick (the soft brick with no holes) was delivered to the job site by dump truck, and just dumped on the ground. Broken or chipped brick were either cut for smaller pieces, or used on the interior of walls, where they would be covered. I have no idea how it was shipped; I think all the brick in use in Chicago at that time was produced locally, and may have been shipped from the brick plant in dump trucks.

Face brick, the hard brick with shrinkage holes, was valuable enough that it rated special handling. It was delivered on flatbed trucks, offloaded by hand with a brick tongs, and stacked. It was stacked again on a brick barrow for movement around the job site. This is the  brick was loaded in boxcars by hand, unloaded and stacked at the retail brick yard by hand, then loaded once again by hand for delivery.

By the seventies local brick production had ended, and with it the availability of the distinctive "Chicago pink" common brick. As older neighborhoods were demolished, a business in used brick arose. It is my understanding that the "Chicago pink" was much in demand as an architectural wall covering in California. Used brick was salvaged on the demolition site by day labor being paid by the brick, and initially stacked and loaded by hand, using the traditional methods. I had some photos published in RMC in the early eighties of used brick being loaded into boxcars spotted on a team track using the old, labor intensive brick tongs.

By this time new brick was being shipped bundled such that it could be unloaded by a forklift, and 'self unloader' delivery trucks were becoming common. It wasn't long before consolidation in the used brick business prompted the adoption of the same methods; pallets and cardboard wrappers would be dropped on the demolition site to be filled, then a self loading truck would return to pick up the filled pallets. That allowed all the downstream handling to be mechanized, also.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [EXTERNAL] RE: Shipping Bricks

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gary;

One more add:

The steel industry and foundries all over the country used vast quantities of refractory (oven bricks). Since they were valuable, they were usually shipped on pallets bound in place with metal banding, but in your time perhaps rope. They could be any color, but the ones I saw were a very dark red/black, slightly metallic color.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 10:11 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] RE: [STMFC] Shipping Bricks







Thanks to everyone who replied. Really appreciate this group and their expertise.

Gary Ray

52501 - 52520 of 193481