Date   

Re: Barge Cement

ed_mines
 

There is nothing that strikes more fear in a coating shop than silicone coatings.


They can cause all kinds of dewetting & adhesion problems in conventional coatings.


Ed Mines



Re: Lettering application on a tarp

Todd Horton
 

A laser could engrave the lettering onto whatever you decide to use for a tarp.

Todd Horton

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 3/28/16, BlackDiamondRR@gmail.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Lettering application on a tarp
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, March 28, 2016, 7:20 PM


 









   I have a VCR tape that I
haven't watched in awhile, and I noticed a flat car
load, on the Pennsy, of a dining car, This is one of the
small early diners made by the Ward & Dickenson Co. It
fit fully on a 50' flat. The load was covered with what
looks like a canvas tarp and the lettering looks like it was
applied directly on the tarp. It stated  "Another
Dining car built by the Ward & Dickenson Company Silver
Creek,NY." I thought this would make a nice load as the
diner would not be seen and could be carved from a block of
balsa.    My question is....does
anyone have any suggestions how to go about lettering a
scale tarp like this? I had thought maybe using a
lightweight craft paper for the tarp. Dry transfers?
Sealing?   
 Thanks,       Bud
Rindfleisch









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extra width flatcar for moving Army tank?

gary laakso
 

The flatcar in the foreground appears to have an extension on the side to widen it: see the metal bar running the length of the car as well as possible ‘L’ shaped supports for the extra width.  It appears to be wider than the flat car in front of it.
 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock


Gondola Load Contrast and a pre-cooling duct for refrigerators

gary laakso
 

Two gondolas coupled together and quite the contrast in loads:
 
 
and the pre-cooling duct being moved:
 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock


Corn is King

Clark Propst
 

Corn is King in SE Minnesota. Below is the car load totals and percentages of commodities carried on M&StL Trains 60, 61 from the conductor log entries for several months in 1952, 53. Spread sheet in files. I’m going to replace it soon because of all the corrections I’ve made....
 
COMMODITY TOTAL PERCENT
CORN 505 29.3%
FLOUR 196 11.4%
MERCHANDISE 187 10.8%
BEANS 160 9.3%
CEMENT  137 7.9%
OATS 101 5.8%
SCREENINGS 94 5.4%
COAL 84 4.8%
GAS 70 4.0%
WHEAT 69 4.0%
LUMBER 62 3.6%
MEAL 54 3.1%
TOTAL 1719
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Lettering application on a tarp

Bud Rindfleisch
 

   I have a VCR tape that I haven't watched in awhile, and I noticed a flat car load, on the Pennsy, of a dining car, This is one of the small early diners made by the Ward & Dickenson Co. It fit fully on a 50' flat. The load was covered with what looks like a canvas tarp and the lettering looks like it was applied directly on the tarp. It stated  "Another Dining car built by the Ward & Dickenson Company Silver Creek,NY." I thought this would make a nice load as the diner would not be seen and could be carved from a block of balsa.

    My question is....does anyone have any suggestions how to go about lettering a scale tarp like this? I had thought maybe using a lightweight craft paper for the tarp. Dry transfers? Sealing?

     Thanks,

       Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote :

IIRC, by Sept 1939 when the photo was taken, the archbar ban had already been extended a few times and would finally go into effect at the end of the year.  So the stenciling, which appears to have been done concurrently with the last reweigh, is good preparation - It calls attention to a condition that will, in the future, make the car unsuitable for interchange, but doesn't prematurely say that the car can't be loaded for interchange. I think Ted is right and these cars will likely be retained for seasonal on-line grain traffic.

Jack Mullen
============

I agree also. One of the problems we have in this hobby is we keep talking about "illegal" appliances that were "outlawed" as of a certain date. In this day and age where all FRA proclamations have the force of law,  in our era of interest that simply said the cars having those appliances did not have to be accepted in interchange. There were lots of railroads that had mostly captive services that couldn't see spending the funds to upgrade the greater portion of their car fleet. Another example would be the Soo Line and former DSS&A; both had captive iron ore traffic, and both used Andrews, L-section Andrews, and in the case of the South Shore, archbar trucks into the sixties. The key is that the cars never had to go off line.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar (Surviving Boxcar)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

I found a Whatcom Museum but no Lake Whatcom Museum. The Whatcom Museum does not have the boxcar.

 

However, I did find a partial image of what probably is this car on this link from the Bellingham Daily Photo blog:

 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-sE2-jjzTams/TXT5bTsDapI/AAAAAAAABHk/x_HgWE9FQYk/s1600/009.JPG

 

The caption reads, “A weathered railroad car sits by an old section of track near the south end of Lake Watcom”.

 

The location almost certainly is the Lake Watcom Railway (http://www.lakewhatcomrailway.com/index.htm) at N.P. Road, Sedro-Woolley (Wickersham), WA.

 

The website states, “The Lake Whatcom Railway is a dedicated living preservation of the Pacific Northwest's railway heritage…Some ancient wooden freight cars from the Great Northern Railway are also on the premises.”

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Gilbert-Nelson data from the Jan 45 ORER

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Well done! And though I don't model your time period, it is a great framework for my own use of ORERs in 1934. 

I'm wondering if your Excel index would be close enough for me to save keying a lot on headings, even if I have to change page numbers?

 I model the Southern's Winston-Salem division. The conductor's log shows the home/foreign road ratio varied tremendously by line and train. Overall home road was about 50%, but on fairly low traffic branch lines with foci on a few big industries it neared 65%. On the line connecting two cities where Southern dominated one and the N&W dominated the other, the home / foreign road mix was closer to 35% in shorter trains. Many of the trains though were transfers between the Southern (receiving home and foreign empties for points north and east) and the N&W (receiving home road empties for local redistribution) on a different line. On this line 45-55 cars pulled by a Mikado was not unusual since the grade was mostly flat and the cars were mostly empty.  I have yet to combine the conductor reports with ORER to fit my layout needs, but I'm getting closer.  I like how you used the ORER. 

We need to get the next generation of digitized ORERs with such indices out there, but it has to be a "labor of love" since the market is barely there for photocopied images.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Mar 27, 2016, at 3:18 PM, John Barry northbaylines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I've just completed tabulating the freight car fleet as documented in the Jan 45 Official Railway Equipment Register and composed a short blog post about it here:


Enjoy,

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


Fixing a tank car mistake

Eric Hansmann
 

Last year, Frank Hodina shared a mistake he made in painting a Resin Car Works acid tank car. He let that sit for a few months and now the lemon has become lemonade. Frank shares the update on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/lemons-to-lemonade/#more-519


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

Staffan Ehnbom
 

Yes, the GN had more than 20000 of these 40 ton box cars makeing up almost half the revenue freight car fleet in the 1920s. Most of them received steel underframes in the late twenties and cast steel trucks. By the early forties a number of them were still on archbar trucks and were kept in online service for storage of grain doors or MoW equipment and possibly for on line only grain service.There is still one of these cars, GN16105, on arch bar trucks and with workable KC brake gear and horisontal brake wheel at the Lake Whatcom museum in Washington state and in good shape. In my mind it is the most representative GN freight car available for possible restoration.

Staffan Ehnbom

On Mon, Mar 28, 2016 at 4:56 AM, Ted Schnepf railsunl@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hello,

As the car appears to be a terminal grain elevator, probably in the Twin Cities or Duluth, and the GN served a major grain hauling area, could the "archbar" marking, be that the wood car is only used in the grain rush and on home rails, not in free roaming, interchange service.

Most granger roads had excess older boxcars used only a few months of the year for grain service.  Not maintained to the normal interchange standards.

Ted

At 09:11 PM 3/27/2016, you wrote:


Image is from 9/1939, reweigh date is 5/1938. Here's the direct path to the source:
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8a04771/?co=fsa


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used.  HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 5% added).


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Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

Jack Mullen
 

IIRC, by Sept 1939 when the photo was taken, the archbar ban had already been extended a few times and would finally go into effect at the end of the year.  So the stenciling, which appears to have been done concurrently with the last reweigh, is good preparation - It calls attention to a condition that will, in the future, make the car unsuitable for interchange, but doesn't prematurely say that the car can't be loaded for interchange. I think Ted is right and these cars will likely be retained for seasonal on-line grain traffic.

Jack Mullen


Re: A.E. Staley decals

Allen Ferguson
 

Honest officer I didn't do it. 
Try Ted.

Allen Ferguson


Re: Glue for P2K E unit pilot

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Dave,

Mike Rose sells a kind of epoxy ("Cypoxy") that is not cheap but apparently creates a strong molecular bond between most materials, and seems particularly good on most plastics, even engineering plastics.  You can find it on Mike's web site for Mike Rose Hobbies at http://www.mrhobby.com/ .

Todd Sullivan
Liverpool, NY

 


Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

As the car appears to be a terminal grain elevator, probably in the Twin Cities or Duluth, and the GN served a major grain hauling area, could the "archbar" marking, be that the wood car is only used in the grain rush and on home rails, not in free roaming, interchange service.

Most granger roads had excess older boxcars used only a few months of the year for grain service.  Not maintained to the normal interchange standards.

Ted

At 09:11 PM 3/27/2016, you wrote:


Image is from 9/1939, reweigh date is 5/1938. Here's the direct path to the source:
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8a04771/?co=fsa


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used.  HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 5% added).


Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

Ray Breyer
 

Image is from 9/1939, reweigh date is 5/1938. Here's the direct path to the source:


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL




From: "rwitt_2000@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2016 8:51 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

Also note they all have a chalk marking for the number "3".

The re-weigh date on the car in the foreground is 5-30, which would imply the caption date of 1939 is in error as it would be 9 years since the last re-weighing.

Bob Witt



Re: Gilbert-Nelson data from the Jan 45 ORER

Mat Thompson
 

John,

 

You have far, far more diligence than I but the data is interesting. I didn’t find a code anywhere for all the cars types – did I miss it?

 

I don’t do anything as thoughtful and elaborate as you but do pay attention to the types of cars and the road names on my layout because I believe the “right look” helps to tell the story. Here are my numbers:

 

OCRR

76

25%

Pacific Northwest

68

23%

54%

West (UP, SP, ATSF,MIL, PFE

49

16%

70%

East

20

7%

77

Reefers

40

13%

91

Tank Cars

48

16%

100

301

100%

Auto Box

19

6%

Box

67

22%

Stock

20

7%

Chip Car

6

2%

Exp Reefer

6

2%

Flat

24

8%

Gon

6

2%

Hopper

30

10%

Log

26

9%

Milk Reefer

3

1%

Reefer

53

18%

Tanker

41

14%

301

100%

 

I just sold about 30 heavy bunker type log cars – all were OCRs so there subtraction had a big impact on both my road name numbers and car type numbers.

 

Mat

From: John Barry [mailto:northbaylines@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2016 3:19 PM
To: stmfc@...; SANTAFE Discussion List; ATSF@...; Opsig Yahoo Group; airops@...
Cc: Doug Gurin; Mat Thompson
Subject: Gilbert-Nelson data from the Jan 45 ORER

 

I've just completed tabulating the freight car fleet as documented in the Jan 45 Official Railway Equipment Register and composed a short blog post about it here:

 

 

Enjoy,

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

 

707-490-9696 

 

PO Box 44736 

Washington, DC 20026-4736


Re: Arch Bar Stencil On Boxcar

rwitt_2000
 

Also note they all have a chalk marking for the number "3".

The re-weigh date on the car in the foreground is 5-30, which would imply the caption date of 1939 is in error as it would be 9 years since the last re-weighing.

Bob Witt


Glue for P2K E unit pilot

David North
 

I realise this is a bit off topic for the STMFC but given all the input recently on glues, I’m hoping for some help.

I broke the pilot on my P2K E7 and have no idea what will glue it back together.

I assumed it was moulded in ABS, but I tried Plastruct and Acetone with no success.

I don’t want to use ACC as it can leave a white frosting, plus I’d prefer something that welds the plastic together.

Does anyone have any ideas, please?

Cheers

Dave North


Re: new Accurail 36 ft ds box car

devansprr
 

Ray,

And another second - what a great document and reference source for the WWII modeler, who needs a lot of 36 footers (they outnumbered 50 foot box and auto cars during WWII!)

Thanks for sharing!

Dave Evans

51161 - 51180 of 192655