Date   

Re: modelling and detailing info on the Tichy War Emergency gon

al_brown03
 

The Tichy kit, in details, is a compromise between the three largest fleets: PRR, NYC, and ATSF. It has a brake stand like the ATSF cars, ends like the PRR and NYC cars, and towing staples like the PRR cars. So the details aren't exactly right for any prototype, but it's an easy kitbash for several. "Kitbash" may be too strong a word: "detail-modification project" is more like it. I've done one as an NYC car, have another in the stash.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Help with Instruction.

rob.mclear3@...
 

Hi to all


I have a Sunshine A-50-16 kit that does not have any instructions with it, I have been able to find the blurb on the cars in the Sunshine list but I have no instructions is there anyone out there that can scan them and send them to me.  TIA

Rob McLear
Aussie.



Re: liquid cements for plastics

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Kent,

You are correct, Sir. Weldon is used in the sign making industry for gluing Plexi and PVC Sintra board.

I have been using Oatey PVC Pipe cleaner prep in the Yellow Can. It is found at Home Depot in the plumbing department and is about $6.00. A huge value over the Testors street price. I have used it successfully on any model railroad plastic kit and Evergreen Styrene with great success. It also bonds PVC to Styrene and worked great with my latest scratch built house using Evergreen, PVC, and ABS vacuformed roof stock. It bonds in seconds so work carefully.

 

Sincerely,

Rob Manley

Midwest Mod-U-Trak

"Better modeling through personal embarassment"

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 4:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] liquid cements for plastics

 

 

Go to a plastic wholesaler like Regal Plastics, and buy what the professionals use, Weldon, Methylene Chloride.  Sold in hobby shops in small quantities as Tenax, Ambroid ProWeld, etc.  Weldon, as I recall, offers three different evaporation rates.

 

Kent Hurley

nvrr49.blogspot.com.


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Re: modelling and detailing info on the Tichy War Emergency gon

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Other Rob,

Don’t feel too bad. I am getting to finally finish the kit that I bought when it was new. I am glad I bought the RRY Cyc 28 that details those cars. That was a late purchase. As I understand American Model Builders have a laser wood floor and sides for that kit. Now to finish those Tichy Tank cars.

 

Sincerely,

Rob Manley

Midwest Mod-U-Trak

"Better modeling through personal embarassment"

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 5:58 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] modelling and detailing info on the Tichy War Emergency gon

 

 

Rob,
      Which road do you model?  I am looking through the ATSF color guide at this moment and there is a photo of one rebuilt with steel sides in Allentown, Pa. In 1981.
       I model the Reading and they had some almost right up to Conrail.
       Ironically, I just bought an old IHC plastic kit.  I am sure the Tichy kit is a better start.

Francis A. Pehowic, Jr.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

From:"Robert Kirkham rdkirkham@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date:Sat, Mar 19, 2016 at 10:49 pm
Subject:[STMFC] modelling and detailing info on the Tichy War Emergency gon

 

Just picked up a Tichy War Emergency gon, and before I get too far into the build thought I had better find a specific prototype, decals and detailing.  Is there a place I can find out the numbers built per original owner railroad and find specifics on any differences between cars?  As I model ’46, I expect I only need as built info.

I wonder how many years I am behind the rest of the hobby to only be getting to this kit now.  O well.

Rob Kirkham


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Re: More Digital Resources

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Mar 31, 2016, at 10:52 AM, fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Listed are nine ways to download the documents. Some I understand, i.e. EPUB, Kindle, PDF while other are a mystery to me, i.e. ABBYY GZ, DAISY, TORRENT.
PDF is larger file but easiest. ePub is more compressed and fairly universal. Kindle requires app or device (I read on iPad with app). AABBY is a program the converts a scan into lots of formats, including PDF, Word, etc. Torrent is a file sharing protocol with a specific compression and file format. Don't know about Daisy.

I suggest PDF unless it is too big.

Dave


Re: Resource Books

mwbauers
 

I had to hunt this down in my bookmarks….

There is a scaling program available from another seller of the early versions of this book.

The program allows you to print to scale from the huge number of detailed drawings in these books. It’s available separately as well as included with the digitized books he sells. It looks to be very useful.

http://raildriver.com/products/cyclopedias/scale.print.php

“ ScalePrint Utility

ScalePrint is a simple utility for printing picture files to a specified scale or size. It is included free with all RailDriver® Cyclopedias to print the useful and detailed high-resolution pictures contained on the CDs. It was originally designed for model railroading, but can print any normal picture file to a certain size on one or more pages.”

If I read it correctly, it will enlarge over several pages of your printing-out.

also….

http://raildriver.com/products/cyclopedias.php

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 31, 2016, at 7:54 AM, gtws wrote:

I wanted to share with the group that there is a Digital Copy of the 1946 Car Builders Cyclopedia and others available on ebay or direct from Vintage Literature. The price of the 2 Disk Set was 6.97 plus 2.85 shipping. The quality of the scans are good. Over 1200 pages of drawings and pictures. They also have the 1909 and 1916 Railroad Car Dictionary as well for the same price. I found much needed info on construction and brakes I was looking for.

link to ebay
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1946-Car-Builders-Cyclopedia-Railroad-Railcar-Design-and-History-on-DVD-/171561886724?hash=item27f1e2a404:g:aoMAAOSw0vBUecmw



Hope this is new info for the group and not a repeat.



George Toman


Re: Resource Books

mwbauers
 

Thanks. I just ordered it because of this.

I’d like to remind folks that similar early century editions fitting the early years of this group’s focus are also downloadable from Google Books, online. I don’t know if they are also available from a dvd-print source. Last I looked, the later editions like the ’40’s are only available on dvd and used book original print book sellers.

I prefer the digitized dvd versions. It’s much easier to store several of those, and print out any plan or page I need to work with.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 31, 2016, at 7:54 AM, gtws00 wrote:

I wanted to share with the group that there is a Digital Copy of the 1946 Car Builders Cyclopedia and others available on ebay or direct from Vintage Literature. The price of the 2 Disk Set was 6.97 plus 2.85 shipping. The quality of the scans are good. Over 1200 pages of drawings and pictures. They also have the 1909 and 1916 Railroad Car Dictionary as well for the same price. I found much needed info on construction and brakes I was looking for.

link to ebay
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1946-Car-Builders-Cyclopedia-Railroad-Railcar-Design-and-History-on-DVD-/171561886724?hash=item27f1e2a404:g:aoMAAOSw0vBUecmw



Hope this is new info for the group and not a repeat.



George Toman


Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

Michael Aufderheide
 

Good eyes, Bill, I missed that completely.  The car, though, is from an earlier series 17000-18139 built in the 1910s with wood ends, not the 1923 built 8000 series SU clones with steel t-section ends.  None of the photos I have are hi-res enough to read the build dates, but car 18066 shows up in a photo wheel-deep in water at Gosport IN during the 1913 flood.  Both of these series were scrapped before the war, the 8000s in 1939-40, I don't think any were even saved for MOW.  The railroad must not have cared for them, they didn't last 20 years!  Quite a contrast with the Southern, for which they seem to have worked well.

Regards,

Mike Aufderheide


Re: Info needed on UP's "Nearly-Forgotten" Classes

Rich C
 

Tom, I remember that car, I missed out on one on eBay.

Rich Christie


On Thursday, March 31, 2016 11:50 AM, "pullmanboss@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Rich Christie wrote:
> On another note, I wish Ted would make the B-50-17. He did have
> an excellent modeling article in one of his EFC series in RMC.

Sunshine did the B-50-17 as a "Private Stock" kit. I don't know what Martin's criteria were for Private Stock kits, but I suspect they were either variations of his other kits, or models that he didn't thing would sell enough to justify making the dozen molds he typically did for a run of 300 production kits.

Tom Madden



Re: Info needed on UP's "Nearly-Forgotten" Classes

Bill Welch
 

I remember Martin telling me PVT Stock kits were only available at shows. I have the kit. Interesting looking with grabs instead of ladders and really interesting the way it sits on the UF so a lot is visible at eye level. Ted did the patterns.

Bill Welch


Re: Info needed on UP's "Nearly-Forgotten" Classes

Tom Madden
 

Rich Christie wrote:
> On another note, I wish Ted would make the B-50-17. He did have
> an excellent modeling article in one of his EFC series in RMC.

Sunshine did the B-50-17 as a "Private Stock" kit. I don't know what Martin's criteria were for Private Stock kits, but I suspect they were either variations of his other kits, or models that he didn't thing would sell enough to justify making the dozen molds he typically did for a run of 300 production kits.

Tom Madden


Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

Eric Hansmann
 

Thanks for the details, George! I would be most interested in attending a
presentation on the SRHA archives. I enjoyed a Nick Fry's recent
presentation on the Barriger Library at the RPM Valley Forge meet. There is
a mountain of material out there, but we don't know where or how to look for
it in many cases.

I just reviewed my 1926 ORER and wanted to share the following date on the
Southern box car under discussion.

Southern 150555 is one of the 150000-153457 series with 3359 listed in
service. It is listed with the following dimensions:

8-foot interior height, 13-foot, 3-inch height to running board, 2448 cubic
capacity, and 60,000 pound capacity.

This series is listed as having steel center sills. Over 8000 other cars in
different series have similar specifications, but are being equipped with
steel center sills.


The Westerfield models reflect the Southern 153500-159889 series, among
others. These cars are listed with the following dimensions.

8-foot, 3.25-inch interior height, 13-foot, 3-inch height to running board,
2537 cubic capacity, and 80,000 pound capacity

I suspect steel carlines and roof components were used on the later
versions, which lead to a slight interior height increase and larger cubic
capacity. The 40-ton capacity is a result of heftier truck journals.

Hardware differences are the main spotting features. Wood ends and a wood
roof should place a 36-foot Southern box car with the pre-WW1 cars. Steel
ends and roofs place the car with the post-WW1 cars.

I'm certain it's not always that simple, but it is a start.


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2016 9:19 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

Although more research can be done, here is some additional information on
Southern 150555.

It is from an order for cars 150000-151006. 725 36 ft, 30-ton steel center
sill (SCS) box cars were purchased in 1916, 282 in 1917. They are shown in
the ICC Valuation records as VO (Valuation Order) 3 Group 2 in Account 53 on
page 158 dated 12-31-27. Appearing on the initial valuations helps confirm
they were built and on the roster before the first group of valuation
entries were done 1916-1927.

They were built by Lenore Car Works on Southern Contract 633 and paid for on
Equipment Trust "T". (There are more than 1,000 contracts in the SRHA
archives and most of the Southern equipment trust records. Although not
typically very technical, those documents help "triangulate" data from other
sources. That is useful when researching records back to the beginning of
the Southern Railway System.)

Card Record F-59 (called "F-cards") shows all of the drawings for these
cars. Although I have not dug down to drawings showing individual chain
links to confirm, virtually all of the drawing exist as original linens in
the SRHA collections. The cover of the F-Card describes 350 cars were
equipped with Bradford draft gear and 973 with Farlow. Drawing SF-1078 is
the General Arrangement drawing. The F-Card also lists auto box cars in the
160000-160499 series. That is typical of the period as box cars, vents, auto
and stock cars were built to Southern specifications with many common parts
to reduce maintenance inventory. For cars not built by Lenore, Southern
would supply castings (from Lenore Foundry), new or used brake gear,
couplers and trucks to be used in their orders. A practice that made car
builders very unhappy because they could not charge for those parts.

All of this information, on virtually all SR freight and passenger equipment
is in the SRHA archives. If anyone wants to visit, contact me at
archives@srha.net. If this is not too boring for many people (apologies for
the bandwidth) and I am invited to speak at CCB next year, maybe a "deep
dive" clinic on this material may be useful?

George Eichelberger


Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

Ray Breyer
 


>I always figured this was railroad specific... obviously the D&RGW did it, and I would suspect did it to their standard gauge cars when 
>they still had truss rods, but photos seem to indicate the majority of lines didn't.
>Dennis Storzek


Hi Dennis, 

I think that the practice was far more common than any of us realize. I just breezed through a couple of thousand ACF builder's photos (boxcars and gons), and it seems as though any trussrodded car they built had boards through the turnbuckles. I then popped into a small group of 100 or so yard photos from the DL&W archives, and boards through turnbuckles seem to be installed in about a third of the cars. Same with 25 pre-WWI images from the LoC/Detroit Publishing Company images. It's only a very small sampling, but it appears that we standard gauge modelers need to start paying more attention to what our narrow-gauge brethren are up to!

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

George Eichelberger
 

Although more research can be done, here is some additional information on Southern 150555.

It is from an order for cars 150000-151006. 725 36 ft, 30-ton steel center sill (SCS) box cars were purchased in 1916, 282 in 1917. They are shown in the ICC Valuation records as VO (Valuation Order) 3 Group 2 in Account 53 on page 158 dated 12-31-27. Appearing on the initial valuations helps confirm they were built and on the roster before the first group of valuation entries were done 1916-1927.

They were built by Lenore Car Works on Southern Contract 633 and paid for on Equipment Trust “T”. (There are more than 1,000 contracts in the SRHA archives and most of the Southern equipment trust records. Although not typically very technical, those documents help “triangulate” data from other sources. That is useful when researching records back to the beginning of the Southern Railway System.)

Card Record F-59 (called “F-cards”) shows all of the drawings for these cars. Although I have not dug down to drawings showing individual chain links to confirm, virtually all of the drawing exist as original linens in the SRHA collections. The cover of the F-Card describes 350 cars were equipped with Bradford draft gear and 973 with Farlow. Drawing SF-1078 is the General Arrangement drawing. The F-Card also lists auto box cars in the 160000-160499 series. That is typical of the period as box cars, vents, auto and stock cars were built to Southern specifications with many common parts to reduce maintenance inventory. For cars not built by Lenore, Southern would supply castings (from Lenore Foundry), new or used brake gear, couplers and trucks to be used in their orders. A practice that made car builders very unhappy because they could not charge for those parts.

All of this information, on virtually all SR freight and passenger equipment is in the SRHA archives. If anyone wants to visit, contact me at archives@srha.net. If this is not too boring for many people (apologies for the bandwidth) and I am invited to speak at CCB next year, maybe a “deep dive” clinic on this material may be useful?

George Eichelberger


More Digital Resources

Bill Welch
 

Back in 2010 I was able to borrow thru Inter Library Loan the USDA Library's copy of the October 1940 Nat'l Perishable Freight Committee's "Perishable Protect Tariff No.11" and its June 1942 supplement that I then scanned. The NPFC agent, Mr. J. J. Quinn is familiar to me. I think he was perhaps a former RR Exec. that was part of the USRA. The NPFC was set up by the USDA to improve coordination of the shipping of perishables, a problem the USRA identified during its administration of the RR's in WWI. IIRC the NPFC's oversight became effective the same day the USRA went out of business. 


A good friend messaged me yesterday that the USDA Library has now digitized these two publications and they can be found here.


Perishable protective tariff. local, joint and proportional charges and rules and regulations governing the handling of perishable freight, at, from and to points in the United States and ... Canada and from and to points in ... Canada as shown herein ... : National Perishable Freight Committee : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive


Perishable protective tariff. local, joint and proportional charges and rules and regulations governing the handling of perishable freight, at, from and to points in the United States and ... Canada and from and to points in ... Canada as shown herein .. : National Perishable Freight Committee : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive


There was a nice surprise when I checked the supplement because it included a supplement that predates what I have: October 1, 1941.


Listed are nine ways to download the documents. Some I understand, i.e. EPUB, Kindle, PDF while other are a mystery to me, i.e. ABBYY GZ, DAISY, TORRENT.


Question, which of the nine choices would be easiest to page thru on a computer?


As I explored the display I noticed something called "American Libraries" and clicked on it. Wow! This seems to be sort of an index of publications of all kinds that have been digitized. Hard to say where to begin but I hope some of the "Detectives" in this group will help us make sense of what is out there.


My friend said he was made aware of the publications I reference above thru an article in the recent NMRA magazine on Perishable Freight Operations for model railroads. Curious if anyone has read this article and would like to comment.


Enjoy,

Bill Welch



Re: Southern Pacific Freight Cars vol III

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Mar 30, 2016, at 4:56 PM, cereshill@yahoo.com [STMFC] wrote:

Fellas,

I hope none are offended; I am seeking a copy of Tony's esteemed book on auto and boxcars. I have been unable to locate a copy are a reasonable price. If someone has a copy to offer, I would appreciate a notes off list.
Bookfinder.com has 9 listings for new books and a dozen for used.
--
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle


Resource Books

gtws00
 

I wanted to share with the group that there is a Digital Copy of the 1946 Car Builders Cyclopedia and others available on ebay or direct from Vintage Literature. The price of the 2 Disk Set was 6.97 plus 2.85 shipping. The quality of the scans are good. Over 1200 pages of drawings and pictures. They also have the 1909 and 1916 Railroad Car Dictionary as well for the same price. I found much needed info on construction and brakes I was looking for.

link to ebay
 http://www.ebay.com/itm/1946-Car-Builders-Cyclopedia-Railroad-Railcar-Design-and-History-on-DVD-/171561886724?hash=item27f1e2a404:g:aoMAAOSw0vBUecmw

 


Hope this is new info for the group and not a repeat.


George Toman


Re: Info needed on UP's "Nearly-Forgotten" Classes

Rich C
 

Thanks Tim, I forgot to mention that Richard Hendrickson did a kitbash article in RMC 02/85, which inspired me. The article so far has been the best source to date. The problem is in the photo quality. I may just have to translate it the best I could and use an Intermountain 10'6" with 5/5 ends as the starting point. The road numbers are no problem as tables and resources all over the place have documented these cars. I still need to get the Morning Sun Color Guide Vol. 1.

On another note, I wish Ted would make the B-50-17. He did have an excellent modeling article in one of his EFC series in RMC. I remember talking to Steve Funaro at Trainfest back in 2014 and he mentioned that it was on his drawing board. Of course he is a busy man too.


Rich Christie


On Wednesday, March 30, 2016 10:04 PM, "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Rich

I've looked and come up with only ancient email thread started by
Earl Tuson over the S Helper Service box car models. This is all of
the information I could find on any of the classes you mentioned.
I'd contact these gentlemen or perhaps Dick Harley for more information.
An email snippet here


  ==== Freightcar List Email 26 Feb 1999 ==== <<

    [ Ted Culotta ]
    If Earl is referring to the B-50-17 class rebuilds (I'm not aware of any
    other rebuilds that fit the criteria laid out here, but I don't know
    everything), they had a 1/5/5/5 end upon rebuilding... also, the 'A' end had
    a lumber door.  The top rib (the '1' in the 1/5/5/5) was not as long as the
    other fifteen... it was this way to compensate for the inset at the top of
    the end.  FYI... the underframe was a single fishbelly Bettendorf
    underframe, as opposed to the more frequently seen double fishbelly. >>

  Ted,

  The Union Pacific B-50-17 cars were (1934) rebuilds of (1922) built A-50-7 and B-50-13 cars.
  These cars were built with "built up" underframes, not Bettendorf's.  Earlier cousins; the
  A-50-2 & -5 and the B-50-6 & -11 cars were built with Bettendorf underframes.  The A-50-5
  and B-50-11 cars were also utilized in rebuilding programs. The rebuilds were classes
  B-50-36 & B-50-37.  These rebuilds utilized 5-5 dreadnaught ends (however).

  Guy Wilber

  ==== Freightcar List Email 26 Feb 1999 ==== <<


 Looking for information (photos, resources etc.) on what seems to be UP's
 forgotten classes of freight cars. Have not found hardly anything on:

 F-50-12, F-50-13 Flat Cars
 B-50-36, B-50-37 rebuilt Box Cars
 S-40-11 Stock Cars

 I am especially interested in the Box Cars. There is no real info even in
 Metcalfe's Union Pacific Freight Cars 1936-1951, which surprised me.
 Thanks, in advance,
 Rich Christie



Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

Benjamin Hom
 

Ray Breyer wrote:
And if Rapido is releasing some obscure NP car that 'only' counted 4,000 cars, why in the world won't a manufacturer look at a 20,000-plus built car that ran on multiple roads, well through the end of the transition era? As Ben said: lack of education, and plenty of bias against 'old'.

As for the NP car, that's the dirty little secret of some of the "Signature Freight Cars" - they're actually a small part of the overall fleet, but are readily seen in photos and seem to pop up far more often than expected.  Another example is the B&O Class M-53/M-53A wagontop boxcars, which totaled only 3,000 cars.  Even if you lump in the 1,290 similar-appearing M-15 rebuilds, they're far outnumbered by the Class M-26 and subclass cars.

The bias against "old" is the result of both the lack of education among modelers, many of whom don't realize just how many cars built in the teens and twenties were running during the steam-to-diesel transition, and deliberatively deceptive marketing over the years by the manufacturers.  The MDC 36 ft boxcar model is a prime example.  It's been marketed as an "old time" car for so long that 36 ft boxcar = "too old" in the minds of most modelers.  Conversely, some models that represent prototypes from the 1930s and later (ex: Athearn wood-sheathed reefer) were decorated for earlier eras.


Ben Hom   


Re: Interesting Photo of a Box Car and Load

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <tony@...> wrote :

Don Valentine wrote:

 

    Looking again at Bob Witt's Southern SU box car photo take a closer look at the turnbuckles. The two that can be seen have clearly been turned so that the openings in them face one another and someone has done that purposely to slip a board through those openings to prevent them from turning at all from the vibrations of rolling over the railroad. Now there's a detail to model I have not seen before!  


   You must not look at the _Gazette_ very often, Narrow gaugers have been doing this detail for years.

Tony Thompson
===================

I always figured this was railroad specific... obviously the D&RGW did it, and I would suspect did it to their standard gauge cars when they still had truss rods, but photos seem to indicate the majority of lines didn't.

Dennis Storzek




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