Date   

Sprue cutter tool question

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Now that I have set up a workbench in the living room, (benefit being
single), and am cranking out kits at a rate of two a week on average. I
think I need to upgrade my current pair of Micromark/greenway sprue cutters.
(Not sure whose I bought). I have heard that the PBL ones are the best out
there. Does anyone else have opinions?

The pair I have now have worked very well for me but I've noticed that the
narrow tips seem to be losing their edge.

Brian J Carlson
Cheektowaga NY


Truck Mounted Brakes

Gene Green <willibecher@juno.com> <willibecher@...>
 

Truck mounted brakes are illustrated in the 1966 Car & Locomotive
Cyclopedia but not before (that I can find). The first reference to
truck mounted brakes that I can find in the AAR Interchange Rules is
1970. Does anyone know when truck mounted brakes were first
permitted in interchange.

Gene Green


Resin kits

Charles Etheredge
 

Thanks for all the imput. I do have Al's video and it is really
helpful. He makes it seems sooooooo easy! I realize he has put
together at least 2 or 3 kits in his career (!!!) but at least it
makes the task seem not so difficult as it might be. The advice
about starting with a one-piece gon is good...that's the route I
intend to take. I do have a couple of F&C War Emergency Gons
(wooden, T&NO) plus the Westerfield Stock cars but they are for
future use.
Charles Etheredge


Re: ACF tank car book

Ed Kaminski <ed.kaminski@...>
 

Tony Thompson wrote:
Early next year, Alex, Ed Kaminski's book on ACF tank cars, yes, it's
all tank cars, will be published. [snip]>

From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@shaw.ca>>
Tony, "next year" meaning 2004?
No, it's scheduled for release in early 2003.

Ed Kaminski
Visit my home page at: www.geocities.com/shpx60000/theedwards.html
Visit the Maywood Station Historical Committee home page at:
www.geocities.com/maywoodstation/maywoodstation.html


Re: Tank car ID help

Ed Kaminski <ed.kaminski@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: <jabutler@sixy.com>
Anyone have any idea who the RTCX marks belong to.
Thanks
Jim Butler
Republic Tank Car

Ed Kaminski
Visit my home page at: www.geocities.com/shpx60000/theedwards.html
Visit the Maywood Station Historical Committee home page at:
www.geocities.com/maywoodstation/maywoodstation.html


Re: Transformers

alex@...
 

Today I found a copy of a photo of a large transformer (perhaps
200 MVA, 345,000 volts?) being shipped from the Allis Chalmers
plant. It rode on NYC depressed center flat car 499088. I have
uploaded it to the group's Photo section.

Alex Schneider

Date sent: Mon, 23 Dec 2002 12:58:24 -0800
From: thompson@signaturepress.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Transformers
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Send reply to: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

For shipment...The bushings and radiators are removed and the
openings covered with cover plates. This is both to reduce the shipping
dimensions
and because shocks in shipment would cause a bending torque on the porcelain
bushings, likely causing them to break.
I have several photos from the 1950s and 1960s of transformers and other
electrical equipment like large circuit breakers with the bushings clearly
in place on a flat car load. Was the removal of bushings not practiced
then, or is it not always necessary?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history




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Re: Tank car paint schemes

Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Alex Schneider wrote:
With all the good photo books coming out these days, hasn't
someone put out an album of tank cars?

Someone has, though it's a good news/bad news thing - it's one of the
volumes in the John Henderson Classic Freight Cars series.

Pro:
- Lots of color pictures of tank cars.

Cons:
- Almost all of the pictures are 1960 or later.
- As with the rest of the series, the captions are suspect and should not be
trusted without verification.

Of course, Alex, you're welcome to write one! ;-)


Ben Hom


Tank car ID help

h8fan <jabutler@sixy.com> <jabutler@...>
 

In the new C&OHS 2003 calendar there is a 1957 photo taken in
southern West Virginia that has two tank cars in the back ground.
The cars are lettered for UNITED FUEL GAS COMPANY, CHARLESTON, WVA
and the reporting marks (soft focus and in the shade) seem to be RTCX
7253 and 7214. I'm sure the cars were leased but I don't have any
idea as to where to start looking for info or other photos of these
cars to model them. United Fuel Gas Co. is long gone
Anyone have any idea who the RTCX marks belong to.
Thanks
Jim Butler
www.sa-com.org


ACF tank car book

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Tony Thompson wrote:

Early next year, Alex, Ed Kaminski's book on ACF tank cars, yes, it's
all
tank cars, will be published. [snip]>

Tony, "next year" meaning 2004?

Rob Kirkham


Re: "Danger Ahead" 1926 movie comedy

Ron Hildebrand <SteamFreight@...>
 

On the other hand, check out Danger Lights, a 1930 film. Other than the railroad--which is the real star of the film--the best know stars are Jean Arthur and Robert Armstrong (the expedition leader from King Kong).

Chock full of steam action, it's shot all on location on the Milwaukee Road (lots of catenary in evidence on some main line shots). It even features a break-neck 500 mile run to get an injured railroad man medical treatment in Chicago, where the engineer/hero of the film climbs out of the cab window while running at speed, to treat a hotbox on the trailing truck! (No trick shots, he really climbs out of the cab of a speeding locomotive!)

If you keep a close watch, you can see some fairly detailed shots of some freight cars. Also early in the film, there is some great footage shot in and around a working steam era roundhouse, something you don't get to see everyday!

It's also chock full of over-the-top dialogue and acting, except for Jean Arthur, who gives a nicely restrained performance, considering all the over-acting surrounding her. I think it's fairly easy to see here why she ended up with more of a future career than her co-stars, as film technique began to mature and settle into the "talkie" era. (This film was an early sound film, made only three years after The Jazz Singer).

I found this bit of information about Danger Lights on the Web this morning: http://www.filmsonthehill.com/F-32-ManWhoPlayedGod.html

Ron Hildebrand

At 12:25 AM 1/1/2003 -0800, you wrote:
Don't get exited; there's not much there for us. It's a silent comedy
featuring the character "Hairbreadth Harry" (Earl McCarthy I believe) and has
a train/car chase filmed on the UP around L.A. and the harbor. Several views
of UP engine 3165, a very quick view of a Santa Fe box car, an icing platform
which seems to be at Fruitland, a PFE reefer with rectangular WP emblem
(another quick view which is only identifiable because that's the only car
that would look like that) and some too-close close-ups of a UP box car. And
a dark-colored wooden depot I can't identify.
I saw it at a low-budget revival theater (where the movies often read "Not for
theatrical exhibition" at the beginning.) It may have been a Blackhawk Films
re-release. Sometime I'll have to watch it again to see what I missed while
looking for freight cars!
Scott Pitzer



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Re: Tank car paint schemes

thompson@...
 

Alex Schneider ruminates:
With all the good photo books coming out these days, hasn't
someone put out an album of tank cars? That won't prove that
some scheme, offered in pre-painted models or decals, DIDN'T
exist, but it would be a useful guide to things that DID.
Early next year, Alex, Ed Kaminski's book on ACF tank cars, yes, it's all
tank cars, will be published. It will be a start on what you want, though
only of course covering the ACF production.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Union Oil Co. of California tank cars

thompson@...
 

Chris Barkan said:
Some have suggested that cars painted thus were never in revenue service.
This seems presumptuous unless there is specific evidence supporting this.
Given the photo it would seem more parsimonious to conclude that a car (or
cars) painted in this manner did operate.
I, at least, did not suggest that this was TRUE, only wondered if it was
a possibility. As we all know, sometimes there is a photo of something
which does not correspond to operating reality.
But Paul Koehler tells me that, through his acquaintance with a Union Oil
engineering employee, there were "several" of these cars, and he is going
to search his archives to see if he has a copy of the paint scheme drawing.
So it looks like the photo Charlie Morrill identified DOES correspond to a
car in service, though we don't yet know how many there were.
It still sounds a bit like one of those rarities that the prudent modeler
might wish to avoid.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Tank car paint schemes

alex@...
 

With all the good photo books coming out these days, hasn't
someone put out an album of tank cars? That won't prove that
some scheme, offered in pre-painted models or decals, DIDN'T
exist, but it would be a useful guide to things that DID. Taken
together with an Equipment Register, it could even enable
modelers to select the more representative ones to include on their
railroads.

Alex Schneider


Re: Mobilgas Red Tank Car

Richard Hendrickson
 

Speaking of colorful tank cars, there's a photo of a very red Mobilgas car
in West From Omaha by Pfeifer, pg 59. It has a black dome. Yes, I
know...there was probably one on every corner. But...in case you wanted to
know...

Mike Brock...a real tank car would have Sinclair written on its tank <g>.
Yeah, Mike, those red Mobilgas cars were quite common in the '40s and '50s.
What's not well known is that there were several mid-continent
Socony-Vacuum subsidiaries and though all of them had some red cars with
billboard stencilin in the 1940s, the stenciling was different on cars
operated by White Eagle (WEOX, hq. in Kansas City), Lubrite (LUBX, hq. in
St. Louis), and White Star (WSRX, hq. in Detroit). By 1950 all of these
cars had been consolidated under SVX reporting marks and the stenciling on
the billbaord cars was that originally used by White Eagle. By the way,
Socony-Vacuum eastern region (rooted in a merger of Standard Oil Co. of New
York and Vacuum Oil Co.) owned only a handful of cars and there's no hard
evidence that eny of them were ever painted and lettered as in the old
Walthers decal set, with aluminum tanks and red "flying horse" emblems.
That's another model scheme that's either entirely bogus or for which there
may have been only one or a few cars done up that way for PR purposes. If
a photo exists of a car in that scheme, I'd sure like to see it.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Mobilgas Red Tank Car

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Speaking of colorful tank cars, there's a photo of a very red Mobilgas car
in West From Omaha by Pfeifer, pg 59. It has a black dome. Yes, I
know...there was probably one on every corner. But...in case you wanted to
know...

Mike Brock...a real tank car would have Sinclair written on its tank <g>.


Re: Union 76 Tank cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

Charlie Morrill, who obviously has a loooong memory, points out:

There was at least one Union 76 blue and orange tank car --- The photo of
UOCX 10327 was used in Athearn's adds in Model Railroader in the early
'50s.
Thanks, Charlie - that's interesting. UOCX 10327 was a 10K gal. ARA III,
one of a large series of Union Oil cars built in the mid-1920s by General
American (and for which there are at present no accurate models, though
Athearn, before switching to plastic toy trains, once made a metal HO kit
for a single dome 10K gal. tank car that wouldn't have been far off). I
have other photos of cars in this series dating from that era and they're
all painted black with aluminum lettering, so my hunch is that there
weren't very many cars painted blue and orange. But at least we now know
that there was at least one.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Pre-war vehicle color question (not quite freight, sorry!)

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

I've seen color photo books in the stores showing collections of restored models of Deere tractors, Caterpillars, and such. This is quite a hobby itself -- on par with restoring vintage autos.

As far as mail vehicles (and mail boxes) go --- the colors I remember (foggily of course) from the '40s was an olive similar to Pullman green.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: enobiko <deanpayne@att.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, January 01, 2003 12:00 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Pre-war vehicle color question (not quite freight, sorry!)


I model the 30's. What colors do you use for:
RPO truck green (and depot baggage wagons)?
Construction equipment yellow? (Caterpillar, I know earlier was grey)
John Deere green and yellow?
Appropriate colors for steam shovels and steam cranes? (Red for my
shovel body, I might paint the crane differently.)

I have a few kits (Jordan, Woodland Scenics metal and Vintage
Vehicles) I am building, the RPO truck is long overdue for completion
waiting for the appropriate color. I usually use Polly Scale, I
don't know where Badger paints or whatever are available locally
(Cleveland, OH). My buddy has a bottle of GN green, (I think?),
which is kinda close, but not quite.
While these may not quite qualify as freight, the RPO truck carried
packages, even though those came off passenger trains. The Deere
tractors and Caterpillar can be LOADS, you see, so still qualify.
Dean


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Pre-war vehicle color question (not quite freight, sorry!)

enobiko <deanpayne@att.net> <deanpayne@...>
 

I model the 30's. What colors do you use for:
RPO truck green (and depot baggage wagons)?
Construction equipment yellow? (Caterpillar, I know earlier was grey)
John Deere green and yellow?
Appropriate colors for steam shovels and steam cranes? (Red for my
shovel body, I might paint the crane differently.)

I have a few kits (Jordan, Woodland Scenics metal and Vintage
Vehicles) I am building, the RPO truck is long overdue for completion
waiting for the appropriate color. I usually use Polly Scale, I
don't know where Badger paints or whatever are available locally
(Cleveland, OH). My buddy has a bottle of GN green, (I think?),
which is kinda close, but not quite.
While these may not quite qualify as freight, the RPO truck carried
packages, even though those came off passenger trains. The Deere
tractors and Caterpillar can be LOADS, you see, so still qualify.
Dean


Re: Repack question

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Bill,

Repacking of journal bearings was usually done on a 24
month cycle. The process was that the journal box was
jacked up under the cellar and the packing material
underneath the journal bearing, (cotton waste or more
likely later on a specially developed pad,
unofficially
refered to as a "Kotex") would be removed and
replaced. The
bearing surfaces would be inspected for damage. The
axle
would then be dropped while the new packing material
would
then be oiled. This was done on all eight (for most
cars)
journal boxes and the car would be restenciled to
reflect
the maintenance performed.

Most cars were checked for oil on a almost daily
basis...car knockers would carry a can of oil while
inspecting inbound trains at a yard, lift the cover
and add
oil if needed.

The pad was developed due to the fact that sometimes
due to
hard coupling the bearing would lift off the journal
surface on the axle and a string of waste sometimes
would
get lodged under the babbit metal. This would lead to
oil
starvation on the bearing (the oil would form a wedge
and
be the actual load carrying surface on which the load
was
carried) would "wipe" causing bearing failure
(hotbox).
Another cause of bearing failure was the fact that
bums and
transients would remove the waste to use to start
fires at
night.

Interestingly enough, most of the time at speeds
greater
than 15 mph, a conventional journal bearing had the
same
rolling resistance as a roller bearing. But the higher
maintenance requirements, constant oil leakage on the
face
of the wheels (ever notice that all wheel faces on
conventional bearing eqipped cars were dead black?)
and
cold weather resistance (due to higher oil viscosities
in
cold weather) at low speeds (as well as the other
points
mentioned above) led to the eventual banning of
conventional bearings in railroad use. However, they
are
still used today in many applications.

Please note that I do NOT refer to these bearings as
"friction" bearings (there ain't no such thing) This
was a
slander that was due to the direct advertising efforts
of
the Timken Company to bad mouth these bearings. I once
met
a engineer who worked for Timken and he confirmed that
this
was the case.

Bill Daniels
Tucson, AZ

On Wed, 01 Jan 2003 11:12:20 -0500
Bill Lane <billlane@comcast.net> wrote:
Hi All,

If a car was shopped (Painted etc) 10-55, how long
would
it be out on the
road before it gets repacked again? Would this be
simply
adding oil, or
disassembling the trucks for bearing maintenance?
Does
the type of car make
a difference in this? How is this tracked? Finally,
the
main question is,
what would the time frame have been from a paint
job, to
it's first painted
repacked date?
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Repacked Dates

Bill Lane <billlane@...>
 

Hi All,

If a car was shopped (Painted etc) 10-55, how long would it be out on the
road before it gets repacked again? Would this be simply adding oil, or
disassembling the trucks for bearing maintenance? Does the type of car make
a difference in this? How is this tracked? Finally, the main question is,
what would the time frame have been from a paint job, to it's first painted
repacked date?

Please reply to billlane@comcast.net as I don't receive email from most of
my groups.

Thank You
Bill

175521 - 175540 of 189741