Date   

Re: ACF tank car book

thompson@...
 

Rob Kirkham asked:
Tony, "next year" meaning 2004?
Darn! Not used to thinking "3" instead "2" yet. Thanks for the catch, Rob.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Union 76 Tank cars

Thomas Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Bob,

You are not alone in having a car with an incorrect paint scheme in the
museum. The Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania at Strasburg Pa. has a PRR
H30 covered hopper that, although it has a correct paint scheme, was
painted before it was built! This error in the paint date has been
brought to their attention, but unfortunately, they have not been
successful in tracking down enough of the cars history to document the
correct repaint date.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware

"trolleycar68 <68trolley@...>" wrote:


I think you always have be suspicious, more so as you strive for ptoto
accuracy. Along the lines of an apparent blue 76 car, we at the
Illinois Railway Museum acquired a new 1910 tank car restored courtesy
of Ritish Petroleum. (the deal started with Amoco who actually owned
the car but ran on until there was only BP in todays fast
merger-buyout environment). The point is that they thought they had
done a lot of digging and furnished the car painted in a Bogus PAN AM
PRODUCTS scheme with much later AMOX reporting marks. Even the model
manufacturers usually come closer than this. This car and this type
car never carried anything like that scheme, but they thought they
were preserving history - perhaps, but only as they wrote it.

So today anyone can visit IRM and take a photo of a one of a kind
incorrect tank car. We can document that the car was painted for Pan
Am Southern (PASX) in the 1950's and previous to that Root Petroleum
(RUTX) but have so far been unsuccessful in finding ANY photo evidence
for cars from these companies. Any help would be very much
appreciated so we can repaint and correctly letter this car.

Bob Kutella

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Re: Box Car Red case study

Thomas Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Ben,

You are right, especially when the Horseshoe is on the Pittsburgh
Division!

Tom Olden
Newark, Delaware

PS: could not resist this one! TOM


Benjamin Frank Ohm wrote:


Richard Hendrickson commented:
Anyone can claim that they're modeling only to suit themselves, in which
case the way their model railroad is perceived by others is obviously
irrelevant. It's worth noting, however, that such a claim can be (and often
is) used by those whose modeling represents the most ludicrous kinds of
fantasy and has little or no relationship to any real-life prototype. In
practice, it seems to me, those of us who strive for historical accuracy are
trying to satisfy not only ourselves but other knowledgeable modelers as
well. <<snip>> As always, of course, your mileage may vary, but the
argument that "it's my railroad and I can do anything I please" contributes
nothing to the discussion.

Back in November, I responded to a post on PRR-talk concerning the Horseshoe
Curve layout run in the December MR. The layout's scenery does a decent job
of capturing the "look" of the Middle Division, and the production work on
the article was up to Kalmbach's high standards. (Lou Sassi's photography
can make a blank sheet of plywood look like a finished layout!) However,
the photos show a mishmash of different rolling stock periods - you see it
on the splash page with a K4s with pre-war striping pulling post-war
passenger cars and a CNJ "Coast Guard" boxcar in the background, and errors
in some of the other photos including a Class H39 hopper in a red PRR SK
scheme [mandatory freight car content.]

This raised a firestorm of "he's done a labor of love and only has to please
himself," "it's his railroad and he can do anything he pleases," and "you
nitpickers are ruining our hobby" comments, mostly from people who never
post any useful information on the list. Lost in all of the shouting was
these points that I made in my original post:

- Nobody likes to have their work criticized, especially something as labor
and time intensive as a layout.

- That being said, if you write your own copy and set up photography for
your own layout (especially one that depicts a well-known prototype), you
are opening up your work for public approval and/or criticism, and whether
or not you succeed or fail is in your own hands.

Doing a layout is kind of like producing a period movie, where scenery are
the sets and rolling stock are the actors. Even if you get the sets right,
your work is diminished if you dress your actors in the wrong costume or
miscast actors. (Let's face it - you're not going to hire Pauly Shore when
you can get Tom Hanks.)

On modeling the atypical but prototypically correct:
John Nehrich came up with a great proverb on this - "Modeling all of the
exceptions does not an exceptional layout make."

Ben Hom

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Re: Digest Number 970

Thomas Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Bill,

You are right about the sweat lines. I have slides made from prints
taken by a co-worker back in the late '40s and early '50s at Gallitzin
Pa. of double-headed I1sa 2-10-0s on westbound drags at the top of the
mountain with sweat lines on their tenders in the middle of the summer
which was a dead giveaway as to the water levels in their tenders.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware

Bill Daniels wrote:


Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2002 11:05:48 -0800
From: Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@...>
Subject: Re: Re: Box Car Red case study

..."I wouldn't model that dirty UP loco
with the sparkling clean tender despite the
photographic evidence that it actually occurred."

Richard, Mike, Jared and all,

I'll keep this brief since it treads dangerously on
non-topical subject matter, namely steam locomotives
and not freight cars, but I feel that this comment in
general is relavent to the weathering topic we are on.

While it is true that it would be highly unusual to
see a grimy locomotive with a spotless tender, the
fact that during the summer in most locations (those
with actual humidity, not like here in the southwest
where humidity is a dream) one could actually see the
water level in the tender due to the fact that below
the water level the tender side would be wet from
condensation...I've seen this effect in numberous
photos. Now THAT would be an effect worth modeling!

=====
Bill Daniels
Tucson, AZ

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Re: Sunshine Flat Car Frustrations

Scott Pitzer
 

Which Sunshine flat car kit is it?
Scott Pitzer


More M--59 underframe questions

Scott Pitzer
 

I decided to get back to my Sunshine kit and FINISH it! but right away I ran
into two questions:
Step 6 of Added Modeling Notes says to add the short angle plates on top of
the coupler boxes, flush against the ends. I THINK these are the 2' wide
plates with two rectangles on top? They'll fit if I trim them a bit, but they
don't show in my pictures so I can't be 100% sure I'm right.

Step 7 says "Though largely invisible, install the trapezoidal torque arms on
either side of centersill from bolsters toward center of car and toward
coupler box..."
I have 8 trapezoids, 4 of which would fit right up against the centersill
toward the CENTER of the car, and yes, they would be largely invisible. But
how can the other 4 go toward the coupler box, which is wider than the
centersill? Are there other trapezoids, or do I trim the long ones, or...?
Scott Pitzer


Re: Sprue cutter tool question

Paul Gehrett <pgehrett@...>
 

Now that I have set up a workbench in the living room, (benefit being
single), and am cranking out kits at a rate of two a week on average. I
think I need to upgrade my current pair of Micromark/greenway sprue
cutters.
(Not sure whose I bought). I have heard that the PBL ones are the best out
there. Does anyone else have opinions?
Brian,

I'd recommend that you go with the PBL nippers. I've built probably 50 kits
with them and they are still like new.

Paul


Re: Sprue cutter tool question

Joe Binish <joebinish@...>
 

Brian, I've had my PBL pair since '99 and have yet to nick them(despite
abusing them!). They are a great tool that I won't do without. I also have
a plier type from Xuron that I use for bigger jobs. The two together have
improved my modelling and techniques.

Good Luck!
Joe Binish


Re: Box Car Red case study

Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson commented:
Anyone can claim that they're modeling only to suit themselves, in which
case the way their model railroad is perceived by others is obviously
irrelevant. It's worth noting, however, that such a claim can be (and often
is) used by those whose modeling represents the most ludicrous kinds of
fantasy and has little or no relationship to any real-life prototype. In
practice, it seems to me, those of us who strive for historical accuracy are
trying to satisfy not only ourselves but other knowledgeable modelers as
well. <<snip>> As always, of course, your mileage may vary, but the
argument that "it's my railroad and I can do anything I please" contributes
nothing to the discussion.


Back in November, I responded to a post on PRR-talk concerning the Horseshoe
Curve layout run in the December MR. The layout's scenery does a decent job
of capturing the "look" of the Middle Division, and the production work on
the article was up to Kalmbach's high standards. (Lou Sassi's photography
can make a blank sheet of plywood look like a finished layout!) However,
the photos show a mishmash of different rolling stock periods - you see it
on the splash page with a K4s with pre-war striping pulling post-war
passenger cars and a CNJ "Coast Guard" boxcar in the background, and errors
in some of the other photos including a Class H39 hopper in a red PRR SK
scheme [mandatory freight car content.]

This raised a firestorm of "he's done a labor of love and only has to please
himself," "it's his railroad and he can do anything he pleases," and "you
nitpickers are ruining our hobby" comments, mostly from people who never
post any useful information on the list. Lost in all of the shouting was
these points that I made in my original post:

- Nobody likes to have their work criticized, especially something as labor
and time intensive as a layout.

- That being said, if you write your own copy and set up photography for
your own layout (especially one that depicts a well-known prototype), you
are opening up your work for public approval and/or criticism, and whether
or not you succeed or fail is in your own hands.

Doing a layout is kind of like producing a period movie, where scenery are
the sets and rolling stock are the actors. Even if you get the sets right,
your work is diminished if you dress your actors in the wrong costume or
miscast actors. (Let's face it - you're not going to hire Pauly Shore when
you can get Tom Hanks.)


On modeling the atypical but prototypically correct:
John Nehrich came up with a great proverb on this - "Modeling all of the
exceptions does not an exceptional layout make."


Ben Hom


Sprue cutter tool question

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Now that I have set up a workbench in the living room, (benefit being
single), and am cranking out kits at a rate of two a week on average. I
think I need to upgrade my current pair of Micromark/greenway sprue cutters.
(Not sure whose I bought). I have heard that the PBL ones are the best out
there. Does anyone else have opinions?

The pair I have now have worked very well for me but I've noticed that the
narrow tips seem to be losing their edge.

Brian J Carlson
Cheektowaga NY


Truck Mounted Brakes

Gene Green <willibecher@juno.com> <willibecher@...>
 

Truck mounted brakes are illustrated in the 1966 Car & Locomotive
Cyclopedia but not before (that I can find). The first reference to
truck mounted brakes that I can find in the AAR Interchange Rules is
1970. Does anyone know when truck mounted brakes were first
permitted in interchange.

Gene Green


Resin kits

Charles Etheredge
 

Thanks for all the imput. I do have Al's video and it is really
helpful. He makes it seems sooooooo easy! I realize he has put
together at least 2 or 3 kits in his career (!!!) but at least it
makes the task seem not so difficult as it might be. The advice
about starting with a one-piece gon is good...that's the route I
intend to take. I do have a couple of F&C War Emergency Gons
(wooden, T&NO) plus the Westerfield Stock cars but they are for
future use.
Charles Etheredge


Re: ACF tank car book

Ed Kaminski <ed.kaminski@...>
 

Tony Thompson wrote:
Early next year, Alex, Ed Kaminski's book on ACF tank cars, yes, it's
all tank cars, will be published. [snip]>

From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>>
Tony, "next year" meaning 2004?
No, it's scheduled for release in early 2003.

Ed Kaminski
Visit my home page at: www.geocities.com/shpx60000/theedwards.html
Visit the Maywood Station Historical Committee home page at:
www.geocities.com/maywoodstation/maywoodstation.html


Re: Tank car ID help

Ed Kaminski <ed.kaminski@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: <jabutler@...>
Anyone have any idea who the RTCX marks belong to.
Thanks
Jim Butler
Republic Tank Car

Ed Kaminski
Visit my home page at: www.geocities.com/shpx60000/theedwards.html
Visit the Maywood Station Historical Committee home page at:
www.geocities.com/maywoodstation/maywoodstation.html


Re: Transformers

alex@...
 

Today I found a copy of a photo of a large transformer (perhaps
200 MVA, 345,000 volts?) being shipped from the Allis Chalmers
plant. It rode on NYC depressed center flat car 499088. I have
uploaded it to the group's Photo section.

Alex Schneider

Date sent: Mon, 23 Dec 2002 12:58:24 -0800
From: thompson@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Transformers
To: STMFC@...
Send reply to: STMFC@...

For shipment...The bushings and radiators are removed and the
openings covered with cover plates. This is both to reduce the shipping
dimensions
and because shocks in shipment would cause a bending torque on the porcelain
bushings, likely causing them to break.
I have several photos from the 1950s and 1960s of transformers and other
electrical equipment like large circuit breakers with the bushings clearly
in place on a flat car load. Was the removal of bushings not practiced
then, or is it not always necessary?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history




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Re: Tank car paint schemes

Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Alex Schneider wrote:
With all the good photo books coming out these days, hasn't
someone put out an album of tank cars?

Someone has, though it's a good news/bad news thing - it's one of the
volumes in the John Henderson Classic Freight Cars series.

Pro:
- Lots of color pictures of tank cars.

Cons:
- Almost all of the pictures are 1960 or later.
- As with the rest of the series, the captions are suspect and should not be
trusted without verification.

Of course, Alex, you're welcome to write one! ;-)


Ben Hom


Tank car ID help

h8fan <jabutler@sixy.com> <jabutler@...>
 

In the new C&OHS 2003 calendar there is a 1957 photo taken in
southern West Virginia that has two tank cars in the back ground.
The cars are lettered for UNITED FUEL GAS COMPANY, CHARLESTON, WVA
and the reporting marks (soft focus and in the shade) seem to be RTCX
7253 and 7214. I'm sure the cars were leased but I don't have any
idea as to where to start looking for info or other photos of these
cars to model them. United Fuel Gas Co. is long gone
Anyone have any idea who the RTCX marks belong to.
Thanks
Jim Butler
www.sa-com.org


ACF tank car book

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Tony Thompson wrote:

Early next year, Alex, Ed Kaminski's book on ACF tank cars, yes, it's
all
tank cars, will be published. [snip]>

Tony, "next year" meaning 2004?

Rob Kirkham


Re: "Danger Ahead" 1926 movie comedy

Ron Hildebrand <SteamFreight@...>
 

On the other hand, check out Danger Lights, a 1930 film. Other than the railroad--which is the real star of the film--the best know stars are Jean Arthur and Robert Armstrong (the expedition leader from King Kong).

Chock full of steam action, it's shot all on location on the Milwaukee Road (lots of catenary in evidence on some main line shots). It even features a break-neck 500 mile run to get an injured railroad man medical treatment in Chicago, where the engineer/hero of the film climbs out of the cab window while running at speed, to treat a hotbox on the trailing truck! (No trick shots, he really climbs out of the cab of a speeding locomotive!)

If you keep a close watch, you can see some fairly detailed shots of some freight cars. Also early in the film, there is some great footage shot in and around a working steam era roundhouse, something you don't get to see everyday!

It's also chock full of over-the-top dialogue and acting, except for Jean Arthur, who gives a nicely restrained performance, considering all the over-acting surrounding her. I think it's fairly easy to see here why she ended up with more of a future career than her co-stars, as film technique began to mature and settle into the "talkie" era. (This film was an early sound film, made only three years after The Jazz Singer).

I found this bit of information about Danger Lights on the Web this morning: http://www.filmsonthehill.com/F-32-ManWhoPlayedGod.html

Ron Hildebrand

At 12:25 AM 1/1/2003 -0800, you wrote:
Don't get exited; there's not much there for us. It's a silent comedy
featuring the character "Hairbreadth Harry" (Earl McCarthy I believe) and has
a train/car chase filmed on the UP around L.A. and the harbor. Several views
of UP engine 3165, a very quick view of a Santa Fe box car, an icing platform
which seems to be at Fruitland, a PFE reefer with rectangular WP emblem
(another quick view which is only identifiable because that's the only car
that would look like that) and some too-close close-ups of a UP box car. And
a dark-colored wooden depot I can't identify.
I saw it at a low-budget revival theater (where the movies often read "Not for
theatrical exhibition" at the beginning.) It may have been a Blackhawk Films
re-release. Sometime I'll have to watch it again to see what I missed while
looking for freight cars!
Scott Pitzer



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Re: Tank car paint schemes

thompson@...
 

Alex Schneider ruminates:
With all the good photo books coming out these days, hasn't
someone put out an album of tank cars? That won't prove that
some scheme, offered in pre-painted models or decals, DIDN'T
exist, but it would be a useful guide to things that DID.
Early next year, Alex, Ed Kaminski's book on ACF tank cars, yes, it's all
tank cars, will be published. It will be a start on what you want, though
only of course covering the ACF production.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history

179221 - 179240 of 193450