Date   

Re: MECHANICAL REFRIGERATOR CARS

Brad Smith
 

Swift's early mechanical reefers were in the red scheme with white eves, like the ice reefers. 

Brad Smith

Sent from Brad's iPod

On May 23, 2016, at 6:09 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Joel,


How about breaking this out into a bit more coherent set of questions...


1) Did mechanical refrigerator cars exits in the era of this list (pre-1960)


The answer to that one would be yes, so overall, your question is appropriate.


You might then ask

2) What companies had mechanical reefers in our era?


A quick check of the PFE "bible" indicates that FGE (yes, FGE, not PFE) started with 25 experimental cars in 1949 and rostered 175 cars by 1952.  PFE and SFRD both added mechanicals in 1952.  PFE's first mechanical cars were class R-70-7. In 1955, the earlier R-70-5 ice cars were rebuilt as mechanicals. Classes R-70-8, R-70-9 and R-70-10 followed on quickly. In 1957 PFE added 40' cars in the classes R-40-29, R-40-30 and R-50-6, all prior to 1960. 


Roger Hinman's book on Merchants Despatch indicates that they started producing mechanicals in 1956.


As noted above, both FGE and SFRD also had mechanicals in the period in question. 


Thus, it might be appropriate to narrow any further question to the particular company that you are interested in and then ask


3) What models are available? (It might also behoove you to first search the STMFC archives using the specific company name and mechcanical, e.g "FGE mechanical reefer".


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of mec-bml@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 12:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] MECHANICAL REFRIGERATOR CARS
 


Ive got 2 questions on this type of car,would they fit within the steam era guide lines and if not then PLEASE ignore this question and if they do who offers a HO(either kit or RTR)for these cars..?????

Thanks

Joel Norman




Re: MECHANICAL REFRIGERATOR CARS

Bruce Smith
 

Joel,


How about breaking this out into a bit more coherent set of questions...


1) Did mechanical refrigerator cars exits in the era of this list (pre-1960)


The answer to that one would be yes, so overall, your question is appropriate.


You might then ask

2) What companies had mechanical reefers in our era?


A quick check of the PFE "bible" indicates that FGE (yes, FGE, not PFE) started with 25 experimental cars in 1949 and rostered 175 cars by 1952.  PFE and SFRD both added mechanicals in 1952.  PFE's first mechanical cars were class R-70-7. In 1955, the earlier R-70-5 ice cars were rebuilt as mechanicals. Classes R-70-8, R-70-9 and R-70-10 followed on quickly. In 1957 PFE added 40' cars in the classes R-40-29, R-40-30 and R-50-6, all prior to 1960. 


Roger Hinman's book on Merchants Despatch indicates that they started producing mechanicals in 1956.


As noted above, both FGE and SFRD also had mechanicals in the period in question. 


Thus, it might be appropriate to narrow any further question to the particular company that you are interested in and then ask


3) What models are available? (It might also behoove you to first search the STMFC archives using the specific company name and mechcanical, e.g "FGE mechanical reefer".


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of mec-bml@... [STMFC]
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 12:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] MECHANICAL REFRIGERATOR CARS
 


Ive got 2 questions on this type of car,would they fit within the steam era guide lines and if not then PLEASE ignore this question and if they do who offers a HO(either kit or RTR)for these cars..?????

Thanks

Joel Norman




Re: NYC 19000 Series Caboose

 

In addition to the various kits and r-t-r plastic models, there are several brass models of the NYC standard caboose.  LMB offered the first one many years ago.  More recent models have come from Precision Scale Company and Overland Models.   The short standard cabooses have been done in brass too – these are former LS&MS cabooses with two windows on each side – models from PSC and Overland.  Then there are the “Pacemaker” cabooses that were built in East Buffalo on boxcar frames, five of which were sheathed with plywood and painted red and grey for the Pacemaker freight train.  These East Buffalo cars are a bit longer than the standard cabooses and have steel underframes – no truss rods.  NJI-CB and Overland imported models of these cars.  Good articles on NYC cabooses were published many years ago in the NYCSHS Central Headlight.  I can provide road numbers, lot numbers, etc., for most NYC cabooses, including those built for the P&LE, T&OC, Big 4 and Michigan Central.  NYC also had two different series of steel bay-window cabooses, the earliest of which were delivered in 1949 and ran behind steam for seven or eight years.  Hope this helps a bit.  Hugh T Guillaume

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: NYC 19000 Series Caboose

Seth Lakin
 

As Ray said American Model Builders has a laser cut kit of the 19000. See my article in the 1st Quarter 2015 NYCentral Modeler, about building the AMB kit. 


Also the NYCSHS has an exclusive version of the AMB caboose with replacement plywood sides. 


These kits go together easily with little modeling experience needed. After building a general box that has tab and slot construction, most all other pieces are adhesive backed wood that go together simply removing the backing and sticking the piece to the kit.  I also should say that my modeling efforts that were documented in the article led to the NYCSHS plywood offering. 

Seth Lakin
Michigan City IN


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Tony Thompson
 

     I've been interested in this thread, being the possessor of all published issues of MM. I realize many don't know, or have forgotten, that Bob Hundman explicitly began by recognizing both the production quality, and state-of-the-hobby techniques, in the Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette, and he intended MM to be the equivalent for the "main line modeler." I would say he accomplished that, and then some. For the first 20 years, every issue was beautifully done, though in the late years, his attention may have wandered, and I felt the quality fell off.
       Bob was a skilled draftsman, and produced a prodigious quantity of work, but unfortunately was a little cavalier about details, and many of the drawings contain various errors. Most are minor to be sure, but Bob's ego would not let him EVER admit error or publish any correction, whether of text or drawing. In fact, for most of the life of MM, he would not publish any letter that contained a criticism. When he did his reprint volumes, he reprinted every drawing as it originally was, even when he did know there were errors.
        I agree with those who say the impact on the hobby was immense. He did prototype coverage in a way undreamed of at MR and RMC (then and to some extent now), and as I said, the publication quality was simply excellent. I don't think the errors or idiosyncratic style should loom larger than the contribution.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Dave Nelson
 

I’m missing two just issues (I suspect one wasn’t actually published and the other is just some date in from the late years that I havn’t yet found).

 

The scratch building techniques are good.  Why all that effort never became masters for resin casting COMPLETELY escapes me.  I understand Bob always said nobody builds resin kits, exactly as if everyone was a master scratch builder like himself!  I also recall stories from the early years of these freight car lists where various list members recalled difficulty getting Bob to accept corrections and such.  Those stories left me with the distinct impression he knew what he knew and wasn’t interested in having that change, which should be at least a slight warning.

 

Lots of drawings and here’s where I have a problem: IMO the drawings are fine for making HO scale scratch built models.  They are not of any use for making 3d cad models so they’re difficult to use to create models for simulators and/or 3d printing.  Too much detail is left out and far too few dimensions are printed.   You’d do just as well with an ORER and some photos.  For some, this is a boon, for others a missed opportunity.

 

There are times when his lack of photos led him astray.  I think his Stock car book is one such example… a dogs breakfast of images having little to nothing to do with the text.

 

ALL that said, Mainline Modeler was, IMO, vastly superior to anything else published at the time.  It’s just not a panacea.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 12:12 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] MAINLINE MODELER

One always should use photos to check drawings, as until the advent of the computer and photoshop “photos do not lie” (except when artfully airbrushed).

Charlie Vlk


Re: MECHANICAL REFRIGERATOR CARS

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Joel,

Which cars? If you are asking about mechanical reefers in general, then absolutely. I'm sure somebody here will cite experimental cars from way back, but in general, they began to appear roughly around 1950. Some of the earliest cars were 40-footers, but 50-foot cars were common by our roughly 1960 cut-off time.

If you are asking about specific cars, then someone here can probably tell you if they are allowable.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 5/23/16 1:02 PM, mec-bml@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Ive got 2 questions on this type of car,would they fit within the steam era guide lines and if not then PLEASE ignore this question and if they do who offers a HO(either kit or RTR)for these cars..?????

Thanks

Joel Norman



Re: MAINLINE MODELER

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

 
I replied directly to Mak's question on the relavalance of Mainline Modeler in today's world.  I wanted to share with him photos of a model that I did in the 70's to one that was recently completed.  I would challenge someone to identify which was which.  The point being that we model a period 60 plus years ago.  The content of the material has not changed.  Many new products have come on the market to aid in modeling  (such as the Yarmouht etchings) but also many quality  products have diasppeared (Tomalco clevised and Right-O-Way code 81 flex track).

We have many more quality modelers and models today thanks in large part to the STMCE list.  It
is great to get an instant answer to a question as opposed to taking months to determine the proper brake wheel.

I continually refer to MM for drawings and information.  Almost always when brousing through 
the issues I find something thwt was not relavent at the time but that I now need.  To me the
best modeling article ever was Gene Demling's article in an early 70's  Model Reilroader on
buiding anERIE covered hopper from styrene.  He included the complete rivit detail.  Gene is still
active4 and recently did a coboose article in RMC..  His modeling canalso be viewed on the
Proto 48 webiste and I believe that he has a blog.   This was a single article.  Mainline offered
quality articles every month.

Is the DVD worth the price?  I guess it depends on the modeler.  If I did not have a complete set
of MM it certainly would be for me.

Bill Pardie




On May 23, 2016, at 8:28 AM, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Ray Breyer wrote:
"One caveat: while prolific, the plans in Mainline Modeler are generally good, but almost always suspect in some way. It's OK to use them as a general guide for modeling work, but! never be afraid to print out a few hardcopies and start marking them up based on a lengthy examination of prototype photos."

This is a supremely important point - at least three manufacturers (Gould, Ertl, Branchline) learned this sad fact the hard way. Hundman completely ignored redlines on drawings that accompanied one of my articles (the errors were pretty egregious), and the drawing that was published is a trap fro the unwary.

Ben Hom



Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Charlie Vlk
 

Ben-

This is true of most if not all published plans…..including railroad and manufacturer general arrangement drawings, no matter how well presented.

Way back in the beginning of my careers I worked in an architect’s office and one of the worst jobs you could be assigned was making “As-Built” drawings…..correcting civil, architectural, mechanical, electrical and structural drawing tracings to what the contractors actually built.   It involved deciphering cryptic field notes, cross-referencing brochures and shop drawings for individual components, etc.  

Even the Dean of Model Railroad Drawings, J. Harold Geissel, made boo-boos on his drawings.   Some time after he passed I was able to pick up a pencil sketch of the “Burlington Bobber” that appeared in the November 1954 Model Railroader.   His pen and ink version of the drawing was not as accurate as the original sketch when compared to railroad mechanical drawings and photos.

One always should use photos to check drawings, as until the advent of the computer and photoshop “photos do not lie” (except when artfully airbrushed).

Charlie Vlk

"One caveat: while prolific, the plans in Mainline Modeler are generally good, but almost always suspect in some way. It's OK to use them as a general guide for modeling work, but! never be afraid to print out a few hardcopies and start marking them up based on a lengthy examination of prototype photos."

This is a supremely important point - at least three manufacturers (Gould, Ertl, Branchline) learned this sad fact the hard way. Hundman completely ignored redlines on drawings that accompanied one of my articles (the errors were pretty egregious), and the drawing that was published is a trap fro the unwary.

Ben Hom


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Curt Fortenberry
 


I asked the Chessie Shop if they would post a sample to view the quality.  They said they would but I'm not seeing it just yet.  They did send me a sample PDF so it's available.  If interested I would contact them, they were very responsive.  I'm reluctant to post it since it's their product. 

Curt Fortenberry


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Benjamin Hom
 

Ray Breyer wrote:
"One caveat: while prolific, the plans in Mainline Modeler are generally good, but almost always suspect in some way. It's OK to use them as a general guide for modeling work, but! never be afraid to print out a few hardcopies and start marking them up based on a lengthy examination of prototype photos."

This is a supremely important point - at least three manufacturers (Gould, Ertl, Branchline) learned this sad fact the hard way. Hundman completely ignored redlines on drawings that accompanied one of my articles (the errors were pretty egregious), and the drawing that was published is a trap fro the unwary.


Ben Hom


Re: NYC 19000 Series Caboose

Noel Widdifield
 

We have the AMB kits in Plywood & Scribed side in the NYCSHS Collinwood Shop.  Welcome to NYCSHS - The Collinwood Shop       20% discount for NYCSHS members.

20% discountf


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Ray Breyer
 


>I was not in the hobby during the 25 years of Mainline Modeler so I only have a passing understand of the content and its value. 
>So with the C&O Historical Society offering the complete works on DVD for $249 the question is, with all the changes in the industry 
>is the information still relevant today? In other words is the price paid worth the hobby dollar?
>Thanks
>Mark P Stamm


Almost without question, the information in Mainline Modeler is fantastic, and more than relevant today. Unlike most hobby magazines that focus on layout tours, better box opening for success, and on whiz-bang electronics, MM focused on quality prototype research and on how to accurately model a given prototype, all of which is 'timeless information'.

If you plan on being anywhere near a 'sincere prototype modeler', the styrene scratchbuilding techniques of Al Armitage and Bob Hundman are worth the $249 sticker price alone. Not only do the articles show you what and how, but how not to be AFRAID of actually building a model from nothing more than an assortment of raw materials.

One caveat: while prolific, the plans in Mainline Modeler are generally good, but almost always suspect in some way. It's OK to use them as a general guide for modeling work, but never be afraid to print out a few hardcopies and start marking them up based on a lengthy examination of prototype photos.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Charlie raises an important point about the quality of model magazine scans. I’m disappointed that the MR DVD scans are such low resolution that printed text is fuzzy (pixilated). I would consider purchasing the Mainline Modeler DVD if the quality of the scans is better than the MR scans. How about a review of the Mainline Modeler DVD from some of the C&O or other users? Are the drawings sharp? How well did the B&W photos scan? Can the photos be enlarged to study car details without pixilation? Are pages scanned individually or as two page spreads like Morning Sun did with their eBooks? Can the DVD be printed (unlike Morning Sun eBooks)? Can he DVD files be downloaded to a computer (unlike Morning Sun eBooks which are on the cloud even though you bought them!).



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 12:32 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] MAINLINE MODELER





Mark-

As a consultant to the Model Railroad Industry, Mainline Modeler is one of the go-to periodicals I use as a reference.

If I did not have a complete print run of the magazine I would certainly get the DVD, and still might if the resolution of the drawings is better than the Model Railroader scanned collection just for the convenience of having the search function.

Model Railroader, Railroad Model Craftsman, and some of the other general interest magazines often had/have good information but not in the scope and depth of Mainline Modeler.

Specialty magazines like X2200 and Diesel Era are the other ones that are key references.

Charlie Vlk

Railroad Model Resources



I was not in the hobby during the 25 years of Mainline Modeler so I only have a passing understand of the content and its value. So with the C&O Historical Society offering the complete works on DVD for $249 the question is, with all the changes in the industry is the information still relevant today? In other words is the price paid worth the hobby dollar?



Thanks

Mark

Mark P Stamm





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Charlie Vlk
 

Mark-

As a consultant to the Model Railroad Industry, Mainline Modeler is one of the go-to periodicals I use as a reference.

If I did not have a complete print run of the magazine I would certainly get the DVD, and still might if the resolution of the drawings is better than the Model Railroader scanned collection just for the convenience of having the search function.

Model Railroader, Railroad Model Craftsman, and some of the other general interest magazines often had/have good information but not in the scope and depth of Mainline Modeler.

Specialty magazines like X2200 and Diesel Era are the other ones that are key references.

Charlie Vlk

Railroad Model Resources

 

I was not in the hobby during the 25 years of Mainline Modeler so I only have a passing understand of the content and its value. So with the C&O Historical Society offering the complete works on DVD for $249 the question is, with all the changes in the industry is the information still relevant today? In other words is the price paid worth the hobby dollar?

 

Thanks

Mark

Mark P Stamm


MECHANICAL REFRIGERATOR CARS

mec-bml@...
 

Ive got 2 questions on this type of car,would they fit within the steam era guide lines and if not then PLEASE ignore this question and if they do who offers a HO(either kit or RTR)for these cars..?????

Thanks

Joel Norman


Re: G&F Howe Truss XM

Bill Welch
 

Well done Al. Great to see new contributors to this valuable Blog

Bill Welch


Re: NYC 19000 Series Caboose

ed_mines
 

The AMB laserkit cabooses are exquisite.


Gloorcraft also had a Qualitycraft-like kit for these cars (wood & castings) and I think a hobby shop in Buffalo had an earlier version of this kit.


If I'm not mistaken someone offered an injection molded kit of these cars too.


Ed Mines



Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Mark Stamm
 

I was not in the hobby during the 25 years of Mainline Modeler so I only have a passing understand of the content and its value. So with the C&O Historical Society offering the complete works on DVD for $249 the question is, with all the changes in the industry is the information still relevant today? In other words is the price paid worth the hobby dollar?

Thanks
Mark

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On May 22, 2016, at 3:18 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


Very few of us can claim to be perfect and I guess that this applies to Bob Hundman.
The reality ( to me) is that Mainline Modeler was the best thing that happened to the
hobby in the 70's and for a long time after that. Prior to Mainline we had Model
Railroader and Railroad Model Craftsman which we all bought each month with great
anticipation that there might be an article that pertained to our modeling interest.
Mainline Modeler provided us with a whole magazine full of pertinate articles, drawings
and information every month. This went on for twenty five years.

I had the good fortune of meeting Bob a few years back at Naperville. He was very gracious
and great to chat with. I had a question for him concerning the series of articles and
drawings for Southern Pacific steam locomotives. They did an article on the P-10 4-6-2 pacifies.
There was to be article the following month for the version of this locomotive with the
skyline casing. This was the issue of the magazine that was lost on the way to the publisher
and it never came out. Bob explained this situation and he was more than gracious.
When he got home he sent me the photos and drawings thgat were to go into this lost issue.

I appreciagte everyone's contribution of information and skill that they donate to the hobby.
I may not find everything to the level of accuracy that I am seeking but they area sharing
their information. Bob's contribution to the hobby ws enormous and I will always view him in that light.

Bill Pardie


Re: NYC 19000 Series Caboose

Ray Breyer
 

People tend to forget that AMB has the largest selection of caboose models in HO scale:
That includes a 19000-series NYC caboose.


Ray Breyer 
Elgin, IL



From: "Schleigh Mike mike_schleigh@... [STMFC]"
To: yahoogroups
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 8:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] NYC 19000 Series Caboose



All this recent talk of NYC auto cars got me to wondering.  Is there an accurate HO scale model of the Central's 8-wheel caboose, suitable for service east of Buffalo?  These are the cars with the low-profiIe cupola and the heavy timber corner posts with the large radius.  I did a spot survey of many Walthers catalogs (2000-2015) and found none although I think I recall one from back there somewhere.  Did I miss something?

Thanks for any help with this----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.

40941 - 40960 of 183463