Date   

Re: Scale Etched Chains

Allen Ferguson
 

Bill:
These are not etched but laser cut card stock like material.
Allen


Re: NKP-WLE 24200-24501 boxcars

Ed Hawkins
 

Garth and Al,
The NKP diagram lumps two separate series of cars into one series WLE 24000-24501, built in Jan. to March 1941 to 1937 AAR standards with 10’ IH, 10-panel riveted sides, 6’ door openings, and 7-rung side & end ladders. All 502 cars came with “A.A.R. Rigid Riveted-Car Builder” (flat-panel) roofs manufactured by Pullman-Standard, Equipco hand brakes, wood running boards, and Youngstown doors. Both series of cars received proprietary ends of different designs from American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard.

WLE 24000-24199 built by ACF (lot 2137) came with round-corner 4-4 ACF Corrugated ends. The Pullman-supplied roofs used on cars built by ACF were unusual since ACF normally manufactured roofs of this type. 

WLE 24200-24501 built by Pullman-Standard (lot 5649) came with round-corner 4-5 Pullman ends, which were the same as those used on TC 7900-7999 that have been discussed before on the STMFC, except that the TC cars had push-pole pockets not used on the WLE cars. The corrugations tapered to a point as they wrapped around the round corner. The cars also came with Apex brake steps. Jay Williams offers a Pullman-Standard builder photo of WLE 24260. 

Trucks on 24000-24199 & 24300-24501 were National Type B. WLE 24200-24299 received double-truss spring-plankless trucks. In Feb. 1944, 10 cars of random car numbers had their trucks replaced with A-3 Ride Control. 

Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


On May 26, 2016, at 3:35 AM, Garth Groff sarahsan@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Al,

I'm a bit confused about these cars too. Stan Rydarowicz wrote an article about them in the March 2001 RMJ, but lumped all the W&LE cars into one group, 24000-24501. His article includes a builder's photo of 24232 and a builder's ohoto of 24260, both 4/5 end cars. He notes that the W&LE cars did not have polling pockets. There is not information about 4/4 ends on a separate lot from AC&F, possibly because he no information about them. Stan used the RC kit for his models, keeping the raised panel roofs.

The June 1987 MODEL RAILROADING has an unattributed article with a photo of an AC&F lightweight B&LE boxcar with 4/4 ends, built in 1939. There are diagrams which show the wales to be thinner (thus more widely spaced) and extending all the way to the corners of the end stamping. Drawings for the PS wales show them to be fatter, less pointed, and stopping short of the edges by several inches. The article discusses them only in the context of the experimental 1930s lightweight cars such as the so-called PS-0 boxcars offered in kit form by F&C.

I also found a photo in the February 1987 MODEL RAILROADING that shows a W&LE car. The number is hard to read, but it looks like 24232 again. The ends are quite clear.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



On 5/25/16 6:42 PM, Allan Smith smithal9@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
I have conductors lists from the Sierra RR from 1952-1954. Four cars are listed NKP 24231 24449 & WLE 24281 24476.These cars were built by PS lot 5649 for the WLE. The WLE was incorperated into the NKP in 1947.  I've checked the 1937 boxcar list at SEFC site and the boxcar survey prototype site. I am a little confused by the info from these sites and would like verification of the types of ends and roof . 
The WLE 24200-24501 built 1941 by PS had the PS-0 4/5 dartnaught ends with a (murphy raised panel roof?).
The WLE  24000-24199 built 1941 by ACF lot 2137 had ACF dartnot 4/4 ends and a (Pullman flat panel roof?).
All the photos I can find don't show enough detail to determine the type of roof. I find it strange that a Pullman flat panel roof would be installed by ACF.
I have Pullman PS-0 ends and I would like to build at least one model for the NKP and one for WLE. I can't proceed until I have verfication of the roof type for these cars. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Al Smith
Sonora CA



Re: NKP-WLE 24200-24501 boxcars

Benjamin Hom
 


Ed Mines wrote:
"There is an alphabet route website which has freight car diagrams for both W&LE and NKP, including these cars."

A URL would be nice.

Ben Hom


Re: NKP-WLE 24200-24501 boxcars

ed_mines
 

There is an alphabet route website which has freight car diagrams for both W&LE and NKP, including these cars.


Ed Mines



Re: ADMIN: Mainline Modeler

mwbauers
 

I certainly  agree that this magazine is nearly essential to a model railroader that wants true miniatures for his layout.

I think this magazine was on-line with that site that got mostly destroyed with some sort of never repaired server corruption a couple of years ago, was it Train-life ?

I’d like to ask if anyone knows of this magazine being offered on CD or some other digital media?

I have a few treasured copies of the magazine and would like to have more of them on the usually easier to obtain cd or other digital media. Mainly because the originally published magazines are such a challenge to otherwise obtain.

Thanks guys.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On May 26, 2016, at 5:16 AM, 'Scott H. Haycock '  wrote:


Since the history of the evolution of prototype freight car modeling is now officially approved, may I bring up another magazine for comment? 

Between slapping Walthers or Champ decals on Athearn and MDC undecorated cars, and the resin revolution, was kitbashing. This is still around, for example in the annual Shake and Take group build.

The magazine which, in my opinion, brought this method of more accurate freight car modeling into its own was Prototype Modeler. While this wasn't a glossy publication, with a high end art department, it went where no magazine had gone before.

To this day, I value my collection of PM second only to MM, as far as general hobby magazines go. 



Re: ADMIN: Mainline Modeler

Jared Harper
 


Mike,

I was wondering what was taking you so long to respond.

Jared Harper

---In STMFC@..., <brockm@...> wrote :

ADMIN: Guys,

For the last week or so, the STMFC has been the recipient of many thoughtful
comments regarding the "late" magazine, Mainline Modeler [MM]. Discussion
about this magazine is one of those things that lead to more rules than is
desired...i.e., an attempt to list those things that can be discussed and
those that cannot. In the case of MM, I'm not going to wade through the many
rules to determine its "in scope" evaluation and given that MM was a VERY
significant part of the development of prototype modeling, discussion about
it will be within scope until diminishing returns occur. We are going to
treat discussions about MM [ for the time being ] as if the magazine were a
frt car. Hence, the rules about frt cars will apply:

"Members are permitted to criticize or praise manufacturer's products free
from criticism from other members. Criticism of a manufacturer's business
practices is, however, not within the scope of the group."

So, the magazine's qualities may be criticized or praised free from
criticism by other members. In addition, the MM business practice's
including those by organizations performing associated functions such as
publishing archival information [ CD's ] are not within scope on the STMFC.
IOW, the cost of CD's regarding MM is out of scope...just as is the cost of
a particular model of a frt car.

Believe me, guys, this is best...and certainly best for the group owner [
me ].

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Print vs. Screen

Jared Harper
 



I have been razorblading my MR's and RMC's for years keeping articles for immediate and future use.  The remains go into the give away bin at the library.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

---In STMFC@..., <sarahsan@...> wrote :

Friends,

My turn to throw something out here. To save space (including during my
stint living in a monastery as a non-monastic), I have for years edited
my magazines with an Xacto knife, a steel ruler, and a supply of file
folders. Let's face it, 90% of the content in most magazines probably
isn't worth saving, and if I miss something, I will probably forget it
soon enough. I mostly save freight car articles, plus more general stuff
about my favorite lines, and have a few folders devoted to scenery or
structures. I've also printed and saved many posts by our late guru and
friend, Richard Hendrickson, and yes Tony, some of yours too. That's
still a lot of paper when you consider I've been butchering magazines
for over 40 years. Occasionally some of the stuff that is no longer
relevant, or has been succeeded by better models/techniques,. will get
weeded. You can't keep everything forever.

I refuse to chop up my complete collection of GAZETTES, a few old
FINELINES I have collected, RPCs, or Ted's publications. For the latter
two, it wouldn't be worth chopping them, because I want everything.

For the past couple of years I've been buying some British mags (all
recently dropped by Barnes & Noble), since I take an interest in
English/Welsh O-scale narrow gauge. This stuff goes into binders, just a
couple so far.

Would I buy a DVD? Maybe if there was one on a railroad I am especially
interested in. Otherwise, I have enough projects and articles to keep me
busy in my pending retirement until the end, or maybe until I can no
longer hang onto my flush cutters.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


Re: Santa Mineral Brown

Ken O'Brien
 

John, these are for the 1951-1953 time frame. Thanks for the assist.


Re: ADMIN: Mainline Modeler

Scott H. Haycock
 

Mike,

Well considered, and well adjudicated. I can imagine the headache!

Since the history of the evolution of prototype freight car modeling is now officially approved, may I bring up another magazine for comment? 

Between slapping Walthers or Champ decals on Athearn and MDC undecorated cars, and the resin revolution, was kitbashing. This is still around, for example in the annual Shake and Take group build.

The magazine which, in my opinion, brought this method of more accurate freight car modeling into its own was Prototype Modeler. While this wasn't a glossy publication, with a high end art department, it went where no magazine had gone before.

To this day, I value my collection of PM second only to MM, as far as general hobby magazines go. 



Scott Haycock


 

ADMIN: Guys,

For the last week or so, the STMFC has been the recipient of many thoughtful
comments regarding the "late" magazine, Mainline Modeler [MM]. Discussion
about this magazine is one of those things that lead to more rules than is
desired...i.e., an attempt to list those things that can be discussed and
those that cannot. In the case of MM, I'm not going to wade through the many
rules to determine its "in scope" evaluation and given that MM was a VERY
significant part of the development of prototype modeling, discussion about
it will be within scope until diminishing returns occur. We are going to
treat discussions about MM [ for the time being ] as if the magazine were a
frt car. Hence, the rules about frt cars will apply:

"Members are permitted to criticize or praise manufacturer's products free
from criticism from other members. Criticism of a manufacturer's business
practices is, however, not within the scope of the group."

So, the magazine's qualities may be criticized or praised free from
criticism by other members. In addition, the MM business practice's
including those by organizations performing associated functions such as
publishing archival information [ CD's ] are not within scope on the STMFC.
IOW, the cost of CD's regarding MM is out of scope...just as is the cost of
a particular model of a frt car.

Believe me, guys, this is best...and certainly best for the group owner [
me ].

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner




Re: NKP-WLE 24200-24501 boxcars

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Al,

I'm a bit confused about these cars too. Stan Rydarowicz wrote an article about them in the March 2001 RMJ, but lumped all the W&LE cars into one group, 24000-24501. His article includes a builder's photo of 24232 and a builder's ohoto of 24260, both 4/5 end cars. He notes that the W&LE cars did not have polling pockets. There is not information about 4/4 ends on a separate lot from AC&F, possibly because he no information about them. Stan used the RC kit for his models, keeping the raised panel roofs.

The June 1987 MODEL RAILROADING has an unattributed article with a photo of an AC&F lightweight B&LE boxcar with 4/4 ends, built in 1939. There are diagrams which show the wales to be thinner (thus more widely spaced) and extending all the way to the corners of the end stamping. Drawings for the PS wales show them to be fatter, less pointed, and stopping short of the edges by several inches. The article discusses them only in the context of the experimental 1930s lightweight cars such as the so-called PS-0 boxcars offered in kit form by F&C.

I also found a photo in the February 1987 MODEL RAILROADING that shows a W&LE car. The number is hard to read, but it looks like 24232 again. The ends are quite clear.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



On 5/25/16 6:42 PM, Allan Smith smithal9@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
I have conductors lists from the Sierra RR from 1952-1954. Four cars are listed NKP 24231 24449 & WLE 24281 24476.These cars were built by PS lot 5649 for the WLE. The WLE was incorperated into the NKP in 1947.  I've checked the 1937 boxcar list at SEFC site and the boxcar survey prototype site. I am a little confused by the info from these sites and would like verification of the types of ends and roof .
The WLE 24200-24501 built 1941 by PS had the PS-0 4/5 dartnaught ends with a (murphy raised panel roof?).
The WLE  24000-24199 built 1941 by ACF lot 2137 had ACF dartnot 4/4 ends and a (Pullman flat panel roof?).
All the photos I can find don't show enough detail to determine the type of roof. I find it strange that a Pullman flat panel roof would be installed by ACF.
I have Pullman PS-0 ends and I would like to build at least one model for the NKP and one for WLE. I can't proceed until I have verfication of the roof type for these cars. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Al Smith
Sonora CA


Re: MAINLINE MODELER a different point

Greg Martin
 

Nelson and Schuyler,
 
 
Just to remind Schuyler the charter issue was the beginning of Bob Zenk's SP PA article where by he took a piece of Chicken Poop and created a lovely Chicken Soup! The work stands up to anyone's work even today BECAUSE Athearn's nose is much closer than other offerings in styrene. 
 
Scratch building was a passion of Bob's and I can understand the passion as my own brother was of the same clan, he felt that a boxcar was just, in the smallest is common denominator, just that, a box. If you recall my brother Ed Martin scratch built not one but three "Q" stock cars and presented one. Bob was not to be out done and re-created the same car in a different technique.  My brother liked the "lark" and would jump scale and modeling O Scale often or Proto 48 and has several projects in that scale.
 
I believe that Bob's passion for styrene scratch building came directly from his relationship with the late Al Armitage, a long time styrene scratch builder, a tool and die man for Revell and draftsman, left handed to boot. (Right in Schuyler's league of champions) Those that know how to tell will find it in his drawings. Bob tried desperately to get Al to model a project for Mainline, but Al told him that he was just not interested  at his age, and I hear the same from Bob now... I hope I can be like Richard Hendrickson and continue to model until I have to take the mail train home...
 
Dave Nelson, I am not sure how far back you go with your collection of Mainline, perhaps not as far, but the further you travel the more you engage.  The articles that most impressed me were the articles that Mont Switzer would present, he became a mentor to both my brother and myself, truly inspiring... He modeled at "my level", attainable excellence... 
 
Let us not forget the exquisite articles presented by Bob Chapman, his mastery of pen, his accomplished eye for photography and his knowledge through research of subject and his close calculation all lent itself to a very exciting article even if you hated the C&O or L&N or the PRR. Truly amazing another comrade and mentor, these you could truly challenge yourself with.
 
The volumes of prototype articles that found their way into the pages are outstanding, like Martin Lofton's article on the PRR F30a and the other works presented by countless authors...
 
To focus on Bob and not look into the heart of Mainline is a pity.
 
Again, let me remind you all that in Bob's own words he believed that Mainline made this fellowship smaller and let me remind you that in my opinion some may say we may be small but we are mighty...
 
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
In a message Schuyler Larrabee writes:

It didn't start that way, Dave. Bob Zenk's articles in the first few
issues, on rebuilding a commercial diesel model (I don't remember for sure
the locomotive - a PA? - but I seem to think it was SP) was a bash job, and
was spectacular. I still think about it. All my complete set of MM are in
boxes in the basement waiting for me to finish, already, the renovation of
the room

I remember one article which he published "Part 1" but there was never a
"Part 2." I don't recall what it was but I was very interested in it.

But later on, when I had the sense that Bob was scratchbuilding some things
just so he'd have an article to publish, it was all scratchbuilding, or so
it felt.

Schuyler


ADMIN: Mainline Modeler

Mikebrock
 

ADMIN: Guys,

For the last week or so, the STMFC has been the recipient of many thoughtful comments regarding the "late" magazine, Mainline Modeler [MM]. Discussion about this magazine is one of those things that lead to more rules than is desired...i.e., an attempt to list those things that can be discussed and those that cannot. In the case of MM, I'm not going to wade through the many rules to determine its "in scope" evaluation and given that MM was a VERY significant part of the development of prototype modeling, discussion about it will be within scope until diminishing returns occur. We are going to treat discussions about MM [ for the time being ] as if the magazine were a frt car. Hence, the rules about frt cars will apply:

"Members are permitted to criticize or praise manufacturer's products free
from criticism from other members. Criticism of a manufacturer's business
practices is, however, not within the scope of the group."

So, the magazine's qualities may be criticized or praised free from criticism by other members. In addition, the MM business practice's including those by organizations performing associated functions such as publishing archival information [ CD's ] are not within scope on the STMFC. IOW, the cost of CD's regarding MM is out of scope...just as is the cost of a particular model of a frt car.

Believe me, guys, this is best...and certainly best for the group owner [ me ].

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Tony Thompson
 

      I'd agree the C&OHS shipping sounds about $10 too high. But c'mon, guys, just think about it as a ten-dollar contribution to one of the better historical societies. Whatta ya gonna do, save it for two lattes at Starbucks?

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: MAINLINE MODELER a different point

Scott H. Haycock
 


 

Schuyler wrote:

I remember one article which he published "Part 1" but there was never a
"Part 2." I don't recall what it was but I was very interested in it.


He did a part one of a deck truss bridge (Southern Ry, I believe), But no conclusion article. I wonder if this may have been in the "lost" issue?


Scott Haycock 



Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Schuyler, a price of $250 is more than enough support for the C&OHS and compensation for Bob, who has already been compensated once for his efforts via subscriptions! Why gouge on shipping? I bet they would sell more DVDs if the price wasn’t so high, so I’m willing to wait and see if reason prevails.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 9:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: MAINLINE MODELER





I have no dog in this debate, not being a C&OHS member, BUT:



The C&OHS has a paid staff. Their salaries have to come from somewhere. They will also be shipping it in, most likely, a padded envelope, which costs more to send than a letter/ Further, they have a substantial collection of drawings, prints, and other stuff that takes up room (as has been discussed a lot in the MM thread), and they have heat, lights and phone and internet to pay for. You are CONTRIBUTING to the sustaining of the C&OHS’s continuing to be there to provide you, your modeling peers, and the magazines with authentic accurate prototype information.



Having been an officer of a substantial RR historical society, I PERFECTLY understand the need to cover some costs. $16.50 is not unreasonable.



Evidently, you’re willing to forego having a wealth of information, mostly accurate, mostly inspiring, for the sake of not supporting the organization that makes it available..



Schuyler

I went to the C&O site and initiated an order for the MM DVD, but they want $16.50 S&H, which is absolutely ridiculous for mailing one DVD via USPS, so I immediately canceled the order. I hope they will rethink their S&H charge, because until it reflects true mailing costs, I’m not buying.

Nelson Moyer








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I have no dog in this debate, not being a C&OHS member, BUT:

 

The C&OHS has a paid staff.  Their salaries have to come from somewhere.  They will also be shipping it in, most likely, a padded envelope, which costs more to send than a letter/  Further, they have a substantial collection of drawings, prints, and other stuff that takes up room (as has been discussed a lot in the MM thread), and they have heat, lights and phone and internet to pay for.  You are CONTRIBUTING to the sustaining of the C&OHS’s continuing to be there to provide you, your modeling peers, and the magazines with authentic accurate prototype information.

 

Having been an officer of a substantial RR historical society, I PERFECTLY understand the need to cover some costs.  $16.50 is not unreasonable.

 

Evidently, you’re willing to forego having a wealth of information, mostly accurate, mostly inspiring, for the sake of not supporting the organization that makes it available..

 

Schuyler

I went to the C&O site and initiated an order for the MM DVD, but they want $16.50 S&H, which is absolutely ridiculous for mailing one DVD via USPS, so I immediately canceled the order. I hope they will rethink their S&H charge, because until it reflects true mailing costs, I’m not buying.

Nelson Moyer


Re: MAINLINE MODELER a different point

Schuyler Larrabee
 

It didn't start that way, Dave. Bob Zenk's articles in the first few
issues, on rebuilding a commercial diesel model (I don't remember for sure
the locomotive - a PA? - but I seem to think it was SP) was a bash job, and
was spectacular. I still think about it. All my complete set of MM are in
boxes in the basement waiting for me to finish, already, the renovation of
the room



I remember one article which he published "Part 1" but there was never a
"Part 2." I don't recall what it was but I was very interested in it.



But later on, when I had the sense that Bob was scratchbuilding some things
just so he'd have an article to publish, it was all scratchbuilding, or so
it felt.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 3:23 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] MAINLINE MODELER a different point





Maybe. I'm more inclined to think the published had too firm a belief the
answer to everything was scratch building. I think what the market has
shown was the answer to everything (well, many things) was better models -
by whatever means. His scratch building articles were always very
interesting but jeez louise where were the resin kit articles? The plastic
kit articles (think RMJ)? The RPC style articles?

As the years rolled on MM seemed less and less relevant.

As for print, I've purchased every RPC, Ted's books too. But the media
doesn't matter. it's the content that counts (see first paragraph again for
example).

Dave Nelson

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2016 12:00 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] MAINLINE MODELER a different point

Gene writes in part :

Ready-to-Run models and highly accurate resin kits killed any thoughts of
developing the Cadre of readers who would contribute worthy articles.

Gene Deimling
__________________________________________________________

All,

I have known Bob Hundman for a very long time. And I have what might be a
unique relationship with Bob and Mainline Modeler. We are still in touch as
I am with some of the "crew" that made up the core of Mainline over the
years, Dave Peck, and Bob Zenk, I have lost touch with Jeff but admire his
work very much.

Bob would say, " the biggest mistake we made was not to make the hobby
bigger, but to make the hobby smaller..." and in a way it did, or at least
at the time. Gene has pointed this out above and Dennis might agree with
that.

Bob likely doesn't realize that the fellowship Mainline created (as you can
see from the thread here) is actually bigger now than it was then, our small
piece of the puzzle has grown, and has had an impact on the hobby and how it
addresses the fidelity to detail that we now expect. I have tried to point
this out; however, as Tony has so clearly identified, Bob is strong in his
convictions, perhaps a bit too much in my most humble opinion. The puzzle
has added many pieces and dimensions or perhaps clans, that was inevitable I
suppose, STMFC, BBM, Modern Modelers and the like. But I don't see us as
fractured as Bob or others might think. I see as a fellowship, striving for
the same goals, checking our egos at the door as I have professed since the
very first PROTOTYPE RAILS so many years ago.

I have the opportunity and blessings of Bob to perpetuate Mainline Modeler
if I so desire, he just reminded me today as we chatted. ~BUCKET LIST~
Bob just celebrated his 81st birthday yesterday and I celebrate my 61st in
just a couple of weeks. To him I am a kid... To me he is a beacon...

Near the end of Mainline Modeler Bob was of the opinion that the magazine,
Tony, Richard and I had discussed this in the past, was more about
presentation than content, an opinion both Jeff and I adamantly rejected,
but Bob was being Bob.

Likely the hardest thing for anyone involved with Mainline wanted to admit
was that magazine was dead, but at the time with the decline in authors,
content, and the revenues dropping like a stone it was time, but in my most
humble opinion not to go away but to evolve, from traditional print media to
something else.

Mainline gave us something different, modeling content, if not in the
modeling precisely then in the form of inspiration for better modeling. A
tradition I hold dearly...

We talk as if all the good projects are gone, and I say that we haven't
scratched the surface, there is so much yet to be done we need to embrace
the modeling not yet offered... ONE PLACE, ONE IDEA, ONE FELLOWSHIP...

Print is not done, I have always said "feed your head" if your library
isn't full what is your excuse, the Internet cannot replace a library, but a
library might include a different print media like a DVD and a visit to the
Internet, but the Internet should never keep you from your modeling. As my
shirt reads, "Why Yes, I have done some modeling"... It will be the theme
for PROTOTYPE RAILS 2017, its time has come!

I refuse to publicly discuss his business practices as I don't agree with
them especially near the end, and I did let him know personally and
privately, with all do respect this is not a forum for that.

Greg Martin

"Why Yes, I have done some modeling"...


Re: MAINLINE MODELER

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Nelson,

That does seem high, but often shipping charges are computed on the cost of the items ordered. This is the way my main archery supplier charges for shipping, and it really seems like a gyp when an order is mostly feathers. :~(

OTOH, consider the cost in wages and overhead for someone to process and pack the order, buying and stocking the shipping materials (which all have their own markups), plus insurance, plus postage. These costs keep going up. We tend to look back at some fixed point in the past at what now seems right and good, and forget that everything costs more, even though (hopefully) our wages have also increased. Think about the price of an Athearn 40' boxcar. They started out at .79 or so in the 1950s. In the 1970s they were around $1.98. If Athearn still made kits, and if anyone would actually buy them ("You mean I have to put it together? It's got 11 pieces! That's too hard.), you would probably be paying $15 or so. Instead you are paying around $30 for a Chinese person to have all the fun building it for you.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 5/25/16 5:43 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

I went to the C&O site and initiated an order for the MM DVD, but they want $16.50 S&H, which is absolutely ridiculous for mailing one DVD via USPS, so I immediately canceled the order. I hope they will rethink their S&H charge, because until it reflects true mailing costs, I’m not buying.

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 12:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Cc: 'Scott Dam'
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: MAINLINE MODELER

http://chessieshop.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=3291

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 1:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Cc: Scott Dam
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: MAINLINE MODELER

I found the sample but can’t find the DVD for ordering.

Scott Dam
Boulder City, NV

From: mailto:STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2016 6:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: MAINLINE MODELER

I get a page not found error.

dlm
-------------------------------------------------
Dan L. Merkel







Re: Santa Mineral Brown

John Barry
 

Ken,

What time frame?  Santa Fe's colors changed somewhat post WWII.  Tru Color Paint makes a color that Ed Hawkins told me is a dead match to the pre 45 ACF color chips, TCP-19 ATSF Brown.  I will be using that on my S&T 2014 Bx-28 and Bx-31.  Progress on those has been slow with a move cross country to a new job, and they have not been done enough for the paint shop.  I plan to add a touch of white to account for scale effect and maybe a bit more for fading on the -28 in original paint.  Post war the paint was redder, but I model 1944-45 so that should be the correct starting point for me.  
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "kobrien1600@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2016 8:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Santa Mineral Brown

 
I'm looking for an acrylic paint to do up some Santa Fe wooden cabeese. I have some PollyScale Mineral Red, but it looks too red. Suggestions?

Ken O'Brien




NKP-WLE 24200-24501 boxcars

Allan Smith
 

I have conductors lists from the Sierra RR from 1952-1954. Four cars are listed NKP 24231 24449 & WLE 24281 24476.These cars were built by PS lot 5649 for the WLE. The WLE was incorperated into the NKP in 1947.  I've checked the 1937 boxcar list at SEFC site and the boxcar survey prototype site. I am a little confused by the info from these sites and would like verification of the types of ends and roof .
The WLE 24200-24501 built 1941 by PS had the PS-0 4/5 dartnaught ends with a (murphy raised panel roof?).
The WLE  24000-24199 built 1941 by ACF lot 2137 had ACF dartnot 4/4 ends and a (Pullman flat panel roof?).
All the photos I can find don't show enough detail to determine the type of roof. I find it strange that a Pullman flat panel roof would be installed by ACF.
I have Pullman PS-0 ends and I would like to build at least one model for the NKP and one for WLE. I can't proceed until I have verfication of the roof type for these cars. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Al Smith
Sonora CA

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