Date   

Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Brad Smith
 

Beer was shipped from New Jersey in Jersey Central insulated boxcars owned by North American and carrying the NJDX reporting marks.  I believe this was the Rhinegold brewery.
 
Brad Smith


Re: Friction Bearings

Tony Thompson
 

Any take on this?


      No one has seriously argued that railroaders did not use the term "friction bearing," only that it was not in extensive use (and was NEVER in the Car Builders' Dictionary, the official glossary of railroad terms). There were lots of everyday "railroaders' slang terms" that are not in the CBD, and many researchers, including me, feels that rather than try to make use of sometimes inaccurate or even confusing slang, let's stick to the CBD.
      The "friction" term was naturally hammered by Timken, and no doubt many picked up on it. But regardless of occasional usage Ed has found, the CBD never included it, even as a synonym. Since there is friction in both kinds of bearings, it's a silly term anyway, and doesn't really distinguish the two kinds. Roller and plain (or solid) are simple and clear terms.

Tony Thompson




Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Tony Thompson
 

The Anheuser Busch website says this about the company owned cars:

http://www.anheuser-busch.com/index.php/our-heritage/history/history-of-innovation/

"Refrigerated Railcars- Adolphus expanded the use of refrigerated
railcars, which were first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition
in Philadelphia. By 1877, Adolphus was using 40 cars built by the
Tiffany Refrigerator Car Company of Chicago. In 1878, Adolphus and three
other businessmen established the St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co., which
later provided Anheuser-Busch with a fleet of 850 refrigerator cars to
transport beer throughout the nation.
Far be it from me to contradict Anheuser Busch's own website, but this sounds like the usual hokum widely copied about early refrigerator cars. In fact, refrigerated cargoes were being carried before the Civil War, and in 1872 reefer traffic was established even from California eastward. The real mover and shaker in early refrigerator cars was Gustavus Swift. The Swift-Chase reefer design of 1878 was among the first successful cars, and by the early 1880s Swift dominated the shipment of meat in reefers. But Philip Armour liked the idea too, and soon overtook Swift and the other meat packers, All of them either built or commissioned local ice houses for their cargoes. Armour was aggressive in taking over these businesses, and by 1890 was by far the biggest reefer operator, for both meat and produce, with a great network of ice houses and car shops, and a fleet of thousands of cars. In the 19th century, I doubt beer shipments were more than a fraction of that.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: R-40-10 reefers

Tony Thompson
 

I have like 10 Intermountain R-40-10 PFE reefers in kit form. A few of these are the 'premium line' edition with wooden etched roofwalk, and other details not on the 'regular' IM versions.
Of course I'd like to add the etched roofwalk to the others as well. But where can I find these? Any idea? Thanks.

       What running boards you want depends on the era you model. These cars were built in 1936-37 with wood running boards. At the end of the 1940s, all the class was gradually upgraded with things like fans, and also got metal grid running boards. Certainly by the early 1950s, wood running boards on this class would have been rare.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Tom Vanwormer
 

The ice houses were handed to Armour Meatpacking in the 1880s.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Jeffrey White jrwhite@... [STMFC] wrote:

Prohibition lives and not just in the South.

Illinois permitted every political subdivision (county, township, city, 
ward and precinct) to decide if they were going to be wet or dry after 
the repeal of prohibition.  The law permitted that decision to be made 
either by a vote of the elected representatives (i.e. county board, city 
council) or by referendum.  The law also states that once that decision 
was made, it can only be changed by the same method it was made.  In 
other words, if the city council or county board voted to go wet, then 
the city council or county board could return toe political subdivision 
to dry.  And if the wet/dry decision was made by referendum, then it can 
only be changed by referendum.

This created a patchwork of wet/dry areas in Illinois that still exists. 
During the time period we cover, much of rural Illinois was dry.

Of course alcoholic beverages still passed through the dry areas and 
often there was a county that was dry but one or more municipalities in 
the county were wet.

Anheuser Busch products were brewed only in St Louis until 1951 when 
they opened a brewery in Newark, NJ.  This later expanded to 9 breweries 
in various parts of the country but much of that expansion happened 
after the cutoff date of this list.

Busch began pasteurizing their beer in the early 1870s and shipped it 
nationwide.

The Anheuser Busch website says this about the company owned cars:

http://www.anheuser-busch.com/index.php/our-heritage/history/history-of-innovation/

"Refrigerated Railcars- Adolphus expanded the use of refrigerated 
railcars, which were first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition 
in Philadelphia. By 1877, Adolphus was using 40 cars built by the 
Tiffany Refrigerator Car Company of Chicago. In 1878, Adolphus and three 
other businessmen established the St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co., which 
later provided Anheuser-Busch with a fleet of 850 refrigerator cars to 
transport beer throughout the nation.

Rail-side Ice Houses- Ice was another variable that Adolphus had to 
manage in the shipment of his beer to distant markets. Ice melts, so in 
order to keep the refrigerated railcars cold, fresh supplies needed to 
be stored so that the cars could be repacked. To make sure the company 
had an ample supply of fresh ice, Anheuser-Busch built a series of ice 
houses and storage depots. When the railcars pulled in after traveling a 
distance, they could stop and reload with fresh ice."

I wasn't aware that the company built it's own ice houses.  I wonder 
where they were located and how long they lasted?

Jeff White

Alma, IL




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Re: 3D Printing at the Library

Ken Adams
 

I looked closely at the photos of the SP Ballast Hopper yesterday.  It is an H-100-4 built 1-62 so never hauled behind steam and therefore not a subject for this list.

Ken Adams


Re: 3D Printing at the Library

Ken Adams
 

The Walnut Creek Branch of Contra Costa Library system has had a printer "donated" I believe by a 3 D CAD design company who also holds introductory classes using free TinkerCAD web based design software. The design needs to be exported to Autodesk MeshMaster to create a good printable file. Once you create the file you email it to the Library staff to determine if printable. It is a few steps up from a home version printer but not in the Shapeways class. I find TinkerCAD suitable for entry level and better than Sketchup and its successor. 

I have several design projects including the elusive SP H-50-6 ballast hopper in mind (to keep this on subject)  but my efforts with TinkerCAD have proved fruitless. Age caused deteriorating fine muscular control.

Yesterday I was escaping the hot weather and was able to get a few photo's of an SP H-100-? rusting away at Felton California but did not have permission to climb on it and photograph the interior slope sheets. It is an Enterprise ballast door hopper not a Rogers Hart.  It is beyond the date limit on this group. 

Ken Adams
Walnut Creek
 


Re: Watch "Joe Bonamassa - From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube

david ellzey
 

I can probably google it and get it.
Dave



From: "'paul.doggett2472' paul.doggett2472@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, June 3, 2016 4:59 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Watch "Joe Bonamassa - From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube

 
Pity it was good there's lots of Joe Bonamassa on u tube.
Paul 




Sent from Samsung mobile

"david ellzey davidellzey1@... [STMFC]" wrote:
 
That didn't work either:-((((
Dave



From: "'paul.doggett2472' paul.doggett2472@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...; ourdavid@...
Sent: Thursday, June 2, 2016 3:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Watch "Joe Bonamassa - From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube

 
https://youtu.be/MDcsPd8PTCE





Sent from Samsung mobile





Re: R-40-10 reefers

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Fred,

Plano makes roof walks specifically for the R-40-23 cars, and I'll bet they fit the R-40-10 just as well.  Some are on eBay right now - just search on "Intermountain refrigerator" in the "HO Scale" subject category.   It helps if you ask for the lowest priced items first in the list.  Or you can order through your LHS.

Todd Sullivan
Liverpool, NY


Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

John Barry
 

And those county options were the source of many establishments such as Friendship House Lounge on the Walton County Line, now repaced by Captain Dave's on the Gulf.  https://www.google.com/maps/@30.3795191,-86.3975861,3a,75y,169.47h,89.08t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sHWItdJp2xAiFMhl1SpleBg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1  

Unfortunately not served by the L&N carrying STMFC east and west at the north end of the county.
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, June 3, 2016 1:20 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Beer Reefers for Everyone

 
Mark Rickert wrote:

 
I suspect "everyone" is a bit missleading, another bit of reserch for folks particularly in the south. Prohibition didn't end in some areas until long after this group's cutoff so knowing what areas could or could not have the traffic is another subject to research. 

    Mark is right. Prohibition was repealed as a national law, but states were permitted to continue restrictive laws for that state, including county option laws,

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history








Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Jeffrey White
 

Prohibition lives and not just in the South.

Illinois permitted every political subdivision (county, township, city, ward and precinct) to decide if they were going to be wet or dry after the repeal of prohibition. The law permitted that decision to be made either by a vote of the elected representatives (i.e. county board, city council) or by referendum. The law also states that once that decision was made, it can only be changed by the same method it was made. In other words, if the city council or county board voted to go wet, then the city council or county board could return toe political subdivision to dry. And if the wet/dry decision was made by referendum, then it can only be changed by referendum.

This created a patchwork of wet/dry areas in Illinois that still exists. During the time period we cover, much of rural Illinois was dry.

Of course alcoholic beverages still passed through the dry areas and often there was a county that was dry but one or more municipalities in the county were wet.

Anheuser Busch products were brewed only in St Louis until 1951 when they opened a brewery in Newark, NJ. This later expanded to 9 breweries in various parts of the country but much of that expansion happened after the cutoff date of this list.

Busch began pasteurizing their beer in the early 1870s and shipped it nationwide.

The Anheuser Busch website says this about the company owned cars:

http://www.anheuser-busch.com/index.php/our-heritage/history/history-of-innovation/

"Refrigerated Railcars- Adolphus expanded the use of refrigerated railcars, which were first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. By 1877, Adolphus was using 40 cars built by the Tiffany Refrigerator Car Company of Chicago. In 1878, Adolphus and three other businessmen established the St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co., which later provided Anheuser-Busch with a fleet of 850 refrigerator cars to transport beer throughout the nation.

Rail-side Ice Houses- Ice was another variable that Adolphus had to manage in the shipment of his beer to distant markets. Ice melts, so in order to keep the refrigerated railcars cold, fresh supplies needed to be stored so that the cars could be repacked. To make sure the company had an ample supply of fresh ice, Anheuser-Busch built a series of ice houses and storage depots. When the railcars pulled in after traveling a distance, they could stop and reload with fresh ice."

I wasn't aware that the company built it's own ice houses. I wonder where they were located and how long they lasted?

Jeff White

Alma, IL


Re: Watch "Joe Bonamassa - From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube

Fred Jansz
 

Paul you coul've at least posted Joe's 'Slow Train'..... (from his album Dust Bowl).
Cheers
Fred Jansz


R-40-10 reefers

Fred Jansz
 

Hi all,
I have like 10 Intermountain R-40-10 PFE reefers in kit form. A few of these are the 'premium line' edition with wooden etched roofwalk, and other details not on the 'regular' IM versions.
Of course I'd like to add the etched roofwalk to the others as well. But where can I find these? Any idea? Thanks.
best regards, Fred Jansz



Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Tony Thompson
 

Mark Rickert wrote:

 
I suspect "everyone" is a bit missleading, another bit of reserch for folks particularly in the south. Prohibition didn't end in some areas until long after this group's cutoff so knowing what areas could or could not have the traffic is another subject to research. 

    Mark is right. Prohibition was repealed as a national law, but states were permitted to continue restrictive laws for that state, including county option laws,

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Brad Smith
 

I bet the beer cars passed THRU your county. 

Brad Smith 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Jun 3, 2016, at 4:40 AM, caboose9792 caboose9792@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I suspect "everyone" is a bit missleading, another bit of reserch for folks particularly in the south. Prohibition didn't end in some areas until long after this group's cutoff so knowing what areas could or could not have the traffic is another subject to research. 


Mark Rickert - living in a county that is stil "dry"



Powered by Cricket Wireless.


-------- Original message --------
From: "stevehprr@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date: 06/02/2016 9:55 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Beer Reefers for Everyone

 

Since cars which are conspicuous by their absence in our modeling world have been mentioned: DSDX and SLRX insulated boxcars for hauling beer from Milwaukee or St. Louis are sorely needed. Unless someone is modeling Milwaukee or St. Louis, obtaining a fleet of either is unnecessary, but everyone can use one of each no matter what part of the country is modeled.

A resin caster can make an impact here.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL



HO Viking roofs 8-rung Ladders Apex R.B.s

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-
I have good quantities of the following Intermountain HO ladders, Viking roofs and etched metal running boards.

Centralia Car Shops/Intermountain Viking 40' roofs. Fit Red Caboose and Intermountain 40' box cars. $2.50/each

8-rung ladders for a 10'6" IH box car. This is their Canadian 8-rung ladder in that the side sill step is integral with the ladder. Most USA users will clip off that step. $2/sprue of 4 ladders.

Apex Tri-Lock etched metal running board for 40' steel roofs. Laterals are integral with running board.  $3/each.

Red Caboose X29 Creco 3-panel doors.  3/pairs for $1
Red Caboose X29 Youngstown doors.     3/pairs for $1

Shipping is $3.50 in protected packaging by 1st class mail. I accept checks and money orders. for a small fee I also accept PayPal.

Contact me Off-List (Please) if interested or have questions, at .

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


water tank

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

While not a freight car comment at least this is the right era.  I got a chance to see the SP water tank (listed at Shapeways) at one of our Friday lunches.  It's a thing of beauty.

Search RR water tank by RRRarch.  Tank and stand are separate.


-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: 3D Printing at the Library

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

As Al mentioned, the affordable printers use a completely different technology than the printers commercial firms use. I’ve used Shapeways for all of my 3D prints (nearly 50 projects) and their 3D printers cost around $100,000 each. But I embrace libraries which purchase affordable ones since it can encourage residents, and kids especially, to learn the software and produce something themselves. It just might encourage them to think about 3D drafting as a career…



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, June 3, 2016 6:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] 3D Printing at the Library





As I said I have no illusions about doing this myself. Also very curious who will show up for the session. I am aware that one purveyor of Resin Kits will be doing a series of kits with patterns for roofs and ends generated thru 3D printing. It is interesting to me that libraries are buying these.



Bill Welch










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 3D Printing at the Library

Bill Welch
 

As I said I have no illusions about doing this myself. Also very curious who will show up for the session. I am aware that one purveyor of Resin Kits will be doing a series of kits with patterns for roofs and ends generated thru 3D printing. It is interesting to me that libraries are buying these.

Bill Welch


Re: 3D Printing at the Library

 

The local junior college here in Crossville, TN has one.  By paying a small fee anyone can schedule time on the machine.  In fact, the professor is a model railroader who exhibited his work at a division clinic recently.  Unfortunately, the quality of the machine is not good enough for prototype modeling purposes.  But give it time. – Al Westerfield
 

Sent: Thursday, June 2, 2016 4:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] 3D Printing at the Library
 
 

On a visit to one of my local libraries I ask he they were looking to buy one because I know many libraries are doing so. In fact this one had purchased one and were offering an Introduction on June 22. This the Largo, FL library. I have too many projects to learn the drawing, etc. necessary for this but I have signed up simply so I can observe the magic. I post this because others of you might want to make the same inquiry.


Bill Welch

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