Date   

Re: e bay auctions

ed_mines
 

My experience is similar and I've gotten some snotty rejections but I've bought some real nice AMB laserkit cabooses by bid for much less than the original price.


Ed Mines



Re: e bay auctions

O Fenton Wells
 

Ed, I have purchased cars on eBay as a 'Best Offer' situation.  I have been successful on a few but most sellers have an unusual way of valuing these kits.  I bid on a Westerfield boxcar and offered $19.95 on an item that was listed at $69.00 or best offer.  As far as I know the gentlemen still owns the kit. Of course you can buy it new from Westerfield for about $35.00
Fenton

On Sat, Jun 4, 2016 at 12:01 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Does anyone have any experience buying freight car kits on e bay sold as "best offer"?


Some classic "junk" kits like the Ambroid ACF covered hopper kits are being offered, sometimes at premium prices. Screen roofwalks, ugh! Sealing the wood is no picnic these days either.


Every so often pretty nice kit built cars are offered. There's a nice, built up Gloor NYC caboose being offered now.


Ed Mines 




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


e bay auctions

ed_mines
 

Does anyone have any experience buying freight car kits on e bay sold as "best offer"?


Some classic "junk" kits like the Ambroid ACF covered hopper kits are being offered, sometimes at premium prices. Screen roofwalks, ugh! Sealing the wood is no picnic these days either.


Every so often pretty nice kit built cars are offered. There's a nice, built up Gloor NYC caboose being offered now.


Ed Mines 


Tichy Decals

Bill Welch
 

A few months ago I was told by someone I trust that Tichy had acquired the technology necessary to print decals. Tichy through the years has offered a few decals but the quality was uneven IMO. I think but cannot say for certain that they were done for them by F&C.


I am on their email list and receive periodic product updates and today received the second one about PFE and now WP reefer decals. Here is the link for HO: Tichy Train Group > What's New

Someone may want to let Don diplomatically know that he is confused about the paint schemes I think.


My source was interested because Tichy will also do custom runs from artwork furnished to them.


Bill Welch


Re: R-40-10 reefers

Tony Thompson
 

Thanks Todd I have 'em. Only Q is Apex or Morton on a R-40-10?


        As it was shop work, there is no record, but photos I have seen are all Apex, so that's a safe bet. Others just can't be ruled out.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: R-40-10 reefers

Tony Thompson
 

Fred Jansz wrote:

 

Thanks for your expertise Tony. Saw your name on the Red Caboose leaflet. The kit included fans and tackboards however, a wooden running board. Should've been a metal one in there too. I think I'll model this one with wooden board and no fans and tackboards as one of the 'forgotten' to be upgraded. Heavy weathering included. 


    Not required to be super dirty. PFE did wash a lot of cars in that era, so you can't proportion weathering to age of paint scheme.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: R-40-10 reefers

Fred Jansz
 

Thanks Todd I have 'em. Only Q is Apex or Morton on a R-40-10?
Fred


Re: R-40-10 reefers

Fred Jansz
 

Thanks for your expertise Tony. Saw your name on the Red Caboose leaflet. The kit included fans and tackboards however, a wooden running board. Should've been a metal one in there too. I think I'll model this one with wooden board and no fans and tackboards as one of the 'forgotten' to be upgraded. Heavy weathering included. The other ones could be cleaner with metal (which one? Morton?) running - & tack boards and fans. I have a few Plano boards in my parts box. Would the bracke platform be upgraded too? Read in the big book that some R-40-10's were riding on National B trucks. Maybe renumber the one above and install a pair of these too...
Best regards, Fred Jansz


Re: Friction Bearings

riverman_vt@...
 

Amen and thank you Tony. The term seems to have taken hold of model railroaders far 
more than it ever did with real railroaders and many of us, myself included, occasionally
slip up and use it.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Friction Bearings

Jim Pickett
 

If you look objectively at what the term actually implies, The old bronze bearings, even with wadding and lubrication incurred a lot more friction than did roller bearings. Therefore the name, "friction bearing" is actually appropriate. If what I just said is correct, the name "Friction Bearing" would not have been used until roller (anti-friction) bearings were invented as there would be nothing to compare the older bearings to. If the term, "friction bearing" was used back in the days when they were the only type, my whole argument goes out the window.
 
Jim Pickett


On Friday, June 3, 2016 7:33 PM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Any take on this?

      No one has seriously argued that railroaders did not use the term "friction bearing," only that it was not in extensive use (and was NEVER in the Car Builders' Dictionary, the official glossary of railroad terms). There were lots of everyday "railroaders' slang terms" that are not in the CBD, and many researchers, including me, feels that rather than try to make use of sometimes inaccurate or even confusing slang, let's stick to the CBD.
      The "friction" term was naturally hammered by Timken, and no doubt many picked up on it. But regardless of occasional usage Ed has found, the CBD never included it, even as a synonym. Since there is friction in both kinds of bearings, it's a silly term anyway, and doesn't really distinguish the two kinds. Roller and plain (or solid) are simple and clear terms.

Tony Thompson






ADMIN: Termination of: " Watch "Joe Bonamassa - From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube" Thread

Mikebrock
 

For those that may have missed it, threads including Joe Bonanassa are now terminated.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Watch "Joe Bonamassa - From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube

Mikebrock
 

ADMIN: David Ellzey says regarding: "From the Album Clammy and Cold Eze Sing the Delta Classics.The NyQuil Blues..." on YouTube"
-----
"I can probably google it and get it."
Dave

Possibly but don't bring it to the STMFC because the subject including refernces to Joe Bonamassa are now terminated.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner



Subject: [STMFC] Re: Watch "J


Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

David North
 

At one golf club in Kansas City golfers would play a round of golf, then cross the road to go to the club house for a beer.

That road happened to be the state line.

The golf course was in Missouri which was dry – the club house was in Kansas which was wet.

(I think I have that the right way around).

I was told this during the 1998 Kansas City NMRA Convention.

Cheers

Dave


Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

CJ Riley
 

A town near Tacoma just repealed probibition in the past few months by public vote.


Sent from my MetroPCS 4G LTE Android device


Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Brad Smith
 

Beer was shipped from New Jersey in Jersey Central insulated boxcars owned by North American and carrying the NJDX reporting marks.  I believe this was the Rhinegold brewery.
 
Brad Smith


Re: Friction Bearings

Tony Thompson
 

Any take on this?


      No one has seriously argued that railroaders did not use the term "friction bearing," only that it was not in extensive use (and was NEVER in the Car Builders' Dictionary, the official glossary of railroad terms). There were lots of everyday "railroaders' slang terms" that are not in the CBD, and many researchers, including me, feels that rather than try to make use of sometimes inaccurate or even confusing slang, let's stick to the CBD.
      The "friction" term was naturally hammered by Timken, and no doubt many picked up on it. But regardless of occasional usage Ed has found, the CBD never included it, even as a synonym. Since there is friction in both kinds of bearings, it's a silly term anyway, and doesn't really distinguish the two kinds. Roller and plain (or solid) are simple and clear terms.

Tony Thompson




Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Tony Thompson
 

The Anheuser Busch website says this about the company owned cars:

http://www.anheuser-busch.com/index.php/our-heritage/history/history-of-innovation/

"Refrigerated Railcars- Adolphus expanded the use of refrigerated
railcars, which were first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition
in Philadelphia. By 1877, Adolphus was using 40 cars built by the
Tiffany Refrigerator Car Company of Chicago. In 1878, Adolphus and three
other businessmen established the St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co., which
later provided Anheuser-Busch with a fleet of 850 refrigerator cars to
transport beer throughout the nation.
Far be it from me to contradict Anheuser Busch's own website, but this sounds like the usual hokum widely copied about early refrigerator cars. In fact, refrigerated cargoes were being carried before the Civil War, and in 1872 reefer traffic was established even from California eastward. The real mover and shaker in early refrigerator cars was Gustavus Swift. The Swift-Chase reefer design of 1878 was among the first successful cars, and by the early 1880s Swift dominated the shipment of meat in reefers. But Philip Armour liked the idea too, and soon overtook Swift and the other meat packers, All of them either built or commissioned local ice houses for their cargoes. Armour was aggressive in taking over these businesses, and by 1890 was by far the biggest reefer operator, for both meat and produce, with a great network of ice houses and car shops, and a fleet of thousands of cars. In the 19th century, I doubt beer shipments were more than a fraction of that.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: R-40-10 reefers

Tony Thompson
 

I have like 10 Intermountain R-40-10 PFE reefers in kit form. A few of these are the 'premium line' edition with wooden etched roofwalk, and other details not on the 'regular' IM versions.
Of course I'd like to add the etched roofwalk to the others as well. But where can I find these? Any idea? Thanks.

       What running boards you want depends on the era you model. These cars were built in 1936-37 with wood running boards. At the end of the 1940s, all the class was gradually upgraded with things like fans, and also got metal grid running boards. Certainly by the early 1950s, wood running boards on this class would have been rare.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Beer Reefers for Everyone

Tom Vanwormer
 

The ice houses were handed to Armour Meatpacking in the 1880s.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Jeffrey White jrwhite@... [STMFC] wrote:

Prohibition lives and not just in the South.

Illinois permitted every political subdivision (county, township, city, 
ward and precinct) to decide if they were going to be wet or dry after 
the repeal of prohibition.  The law permitted that decision to be made 
either by a vote of the elected representatives (i.e. county board, city 
council) or by referendum.  The law also states that once that decision 
was made, it can only be changed by the same method it was made.  In 
other words, if the city council or county board voted to go wet, then 
the city council or county board could return toe political subdivision 
to dry.  And if the wet/dry decision was made by referendum, then it can 
only be changed by referendum.

This created a patchwork of wet/dry areas in Illinois that still exists. 
During the time period we cover, much of rural Illinois was dry.

Of course alcoholic beverages still passed through the dry areas and 
often there was a county that was dry but one or more municipalities in 
the county were wet.

Anheuser Busch products were brewed only in St Louis until 1951 when 
they opened a brewery in Newark, NJ.  This later expanded to 9 breweries 
in various parts of the country but much of that expansion happened 
after the cutoff date of this list.

Busch began pasteurizing their beer in the early 1870s and shipped it 
nationwide.

The Anheuser Busch website says this about the company owned cars:

http://www.anheuser-busch.com/index.php/our-heritage/history/history-of-innovation/

"Refrigerated Railcars- Adolphus expanded the use of refrigerated 
railcars, which were first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition 
in Philadelphia. By 1877, Adolphus was using 40 cars built by the 
Tiffany Refrigerator Car Company of Chicago. In 1878, Adolphus and three 
other businessmen established the St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co., which 
later provided Anheuser-Busch with a fleet of 850 refrigerator cars to 
transport beer throughout the nation.

Rail-side Ice Houses- Ice was another variable that Adolphus had to 
manage in the shipment of his beer to distant markets. Ice melts, so in 
order to keep the refrigerated railcars cold, fresh supplies needed to 
be stored so that the cars could be repacked. To make sure the company 
had an ample supply of fresh ice, Anheuser-Busch built a series of ice 
houses and storage depots. When the railcars pulled in after traveling a 
distance, they could stop and reload with fresh ice."

I wasn't aware that the company built it's own ice houses.  I wonder 
where they were located and how long they lasted?

Jeff White

Alma, IL




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Re: 3D Printing at the Library

Ken Adams
 

I looked closely at the photos of the SP Ballast Hopper yesterday.  It is an H-100-4 built 1-62 so never hauled behind steam and therefore not a subject for this list.

Ken Adams

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