Date   

Re: Tichy Decals

Matthew Dowd
 

I'm glad to hear that the artwork has been passed on and not lost forever. Jerry had some very unique decals that added greatly to the Southern Pacific modeler's "tool bag." 

I'm sure that Tichy will also be a more reliable source for these decals than Mr Glow was. I ordered about $50 worth of decals from him a couple years ago, for which he cashed my check almost immediately. Needless to say, two years and multiple emails later (of which I've never received any responses) I still haven't seen my decals, or a refund.

I apologize for the rant, but I know for a fact that I was not the only one affected by this particular situation. I wish all the best of luck to the new owners of the artwork, and I'm sure I'll be ordering some of these decals in the near future. 

-Matthew Dowd


Re: Red caboose -12 PFE models

Tony Thompson
 

Fred Jansz wrote:

 

Xcuse me for my igorance. What I read in your answer is that the ones lettered for R-30-12-9 are also the wrong ones? I have ten R-30-9 kits that seem to have the right height (all double herald, LA 6-48). However 2 other kits I have are lettered as R-30-12-9, have lower bodies, ROS 7-39. These two need to be repainted & lettered anyway because they would've been in 1950 in real life I guess. Thanks for your explanation.


         The lettering is not a good guide, because Red Caboose did a bunch of paint schemes; follow the height as you have done. And BTW, by 1950 there were precious few R-30-12 or -13 remaining. Not because they had been scrapped, but because almost all had been rebuilt into something else. Best use of that body might be the WP cars, though they too were quite reduced in number.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






PFE decals Re: Tichy Decals

Paul Krueger
 

They just announced a bunch of PFE decals in multiple scales this week.


Paul

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA


Re: Tichy Decals

William Dale
 

I too have heard that Tichy had acquired Jerry Glow's decal artwork months ago, from a reliable source in the hobby.  Also, I was told that the decals that Tichy is printing are done on some sort of machine that is used in pharmaceutical which leaves a sort of raised surface on the the decal sheet.  I have a set I have yet to apply on a model, time will tell I guess.

Bill Dale 


Re: Tichy Decals

Rich C
 

Has anyone heard anymore of Don Tichy buying Jerry Glow's decal artwork?

Rich Christie


On Saturday, June 4, 2016 11:01 AM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
A few months ago I was told by someone I trust that Tichy had acquired the technology necessary to print decals. Tichy through the years has offered a few decals but the quality was uneven IMO. I think but cannot say for certain that they were done for them by F&C.

I am on their email list and receive periodic product updates and today received the second one about PFE and now WP reefer decals. Here is the link for HO: Tichy Train Group > What's New
Someone may want to let Don diplomatically know that he is confused about the paint schemes I think.

My source was interested because Tichy will also do custom runs from artwork furnished to them.

Bill Welch



Re: e bay auctions

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

>Some classic "junk" kits like the Ambroid ACF covered hopper kits are being offered, sometimes at premium prices. Screen roofwalks, ugh! Sealing the wood is no picnic these days either<

H-mmm.  LIke any kit, If one does not know how to build it, or dislikes doing so, the end result will indeed be  “junk”.  For others that enjoy the challenge or accomplishment that fine kit building promises, building and finishing the Ambroid kits can be at the top of the list:  It surely is on mine. 

Denny

 
Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Re: Friction Bearings

riverman_vt@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <tony@...> wrote :

Tony Thompson wrote:

        Actually, be careful with this statement. The measured frictional resistance is vanishingly small between solid and roller bearings at all speeds above about 5 miles per hour. And even starting friction, certainly distinctly higher for solid bearings, is not a huge difference for days above about 50 degrees F (if memory serves on the temperature number). Of course on really cold days the difference could get huge.
         The enormous advantage of roller bearings is not only the virtual absence of hot boxes, but the elimination of all the inspection and maintenance of solid bearings. In economic terms, this is the ball game.


     
     Unfortunately the reduction in car inspection with the use of roller bearings also has created some problems.
As we all know, bearings, too, can and do fail, and the results are just as serious as when friction bearings fail.
And the life of bearings seems very difficult to predict. For example, my wife and I drive Volvos. I have two 1998
XC-70's and she a 2006.  One of my XC-70's clocked 300,000 earlier this year and the left front wheel bearing
began to show signs of failing. My son and I changed all of them and found another that was also beginning to 
go.  With only 115,000 in hers my wife experienced the exact same problem with her left from wheel bearing
last month. Why mine lasted for 300,000 and hers barely over a third of that someone will have to explain to me.
But the point is the same, bearings ultimately fail whether they are solid or roller and the latter sometimes are
not checked enough, seeming from the false feeling that "roller bearings last forever". We wish!

Cordially, Don Valentine



Re: nice roof weathering

Scott H. Haycock
 

 


>Derailment photos are a great source of roof and underbody details. And
>sometimes interiors.

>Andy

Let me try this again- Yahoo is acting up.

Andy,

This might be your shortest post ever  :-)


Scott Haycock



Re: Friction Bearings

richard haave
 

 I spent 40+ years on four different railroads and it was Roller Bearing or Friction Bearing on each of them.


Dick Haave


Re: nice roof weathering

Scott H. Haycock
 





>Derailment photos are a great source of roof and underbody details. And
>sometimes interiors.

>Andy



Re: Red caboose -12 PFE models

Fred Jansz
 

Xcuse me for my igorance. What I read in your answer is that the ones lettered for R-30-12-9 are also the wrong ones? I have ten R-30-9 kits that seem to have the right height (all double herald, LA 6-48). However 2 other kits I have are lettered as R-30-12-9, have lower bodies, ROS 7-39. These two need to be repainted & lettered anyway because they would've been in 1950 in real life I guess. Thanks for your explanation.
Fred Jansz


Re: e bay auctions

Andy Harman
 

At 01:09 AM 6/5/2016 +0000, you wrote:

I bought the Ambroid "box of sticks" on ebay and it contains everything I need to build a nice Pennsy boxcar.
I found that when it comes to sliced dead trees, I'm not my dad or my grandfather. Even if the prototype is wood, I'd rather make it out of plastic. I have yet to actually do this. I had planned to make an N&W CF caboose from stock styrene using the plans and castings from the old QC kit. Then BLI announced a plastic CF, then they un-announced it. Then AMB did a laserkit wood version. Thing is, what I need is a plywood-sided rebuild. I will probably just use the wood sides as a template to make styrene "plywood" sides and build the rest of it as-is. I also have a brass CF to go with my BLI class A and H-2 hoppers one of these days.

Andy


Re: Friction Bearings

Andy Harman
 

At 09:44 AM 6/4/2016 -0700, you wrote:
Actually, be careful with this statement. The measured frictional resistance is vanishingly small between solid and roller bearings at all speeds above about 5 miles per hour.

The thing about changing technology is that often there's no special name for the old tech. It was just a "bearing". So when roller bearings came along they had to invent a marketing name for the "old bearings" that implied inferiority. Hence "friction".

Like, today what is a "light bulb"? We'll probably still be calling them that long after argon-case encased glass globes with tungsten filaments are relegated to museums. Or "digital modem", which is an oxymoron - but "modem" no longer means "MOdulator / DEModulator", it means "box between your computer and the communications network.

I suppose the term "friction bearing", whether correct or not, has the same meaning to both railroaders and model railroaders and if one is motivated to correct the terminology, then one must understand the reference. In other words, communication was successful.

There are plenty of cases where modeling terms differ from prototype terms by necessity. In that regard model builders have more in common with the car builders than with railroaders and shippers who use the cars. The "end user" of a car is concerned with its capacity and ability to do the job. Builders and modelers care about details like how many panels, riveted or welded, etc. I enjoy learning about all of these aspects. I bought my first ORER about 10 years ago, and while it contains no photos or much of anything useful to a model builder, it's invaluable for determining the service live of a specific class of equipment. If I have an undated photo, and I can find the car in the ORER I at least know something about its service life. It has come in very handy especially when modeling steam and transition era cars in my own era. I've put aside a number of models I considered too early only to discover examples in service in my era still wearing a 1947 paint scheme.

Anyway... terminology is good, especially when its understood.

Andy


Re: nice roof weathering

Andy Harman
 

At 09:38 AM 6/4/2016 -0700, you wrote:

<http://www.ebay.com/itm/371646799337?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT>Original Slide - Rock Island RI N&W ATSF Box Car Derailment Scene on N&W 1958
<http://www.ebay.com/itm/371646799337?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT>Original Slide - Rock Island RI N&W ATSF Box Car Derailm...
Derailment photos are a great source of roof and underbody details. And sometimes interiors.

Andy


Re: e bay auctions

Andy Harman
 

I've been buying on ebay since 1999, 99.8% positive results. I've occasionally done the "best offer" thing when it was offered. Sometimes the seller already has a minimum price and if you meet or beat it, you get an instant answer and if you don't, you get an instant rejection. The other way is the offer is open and you don't get a response until the seller actually sees it.

IIRC I bought a couple of PSC brass tank cars pretty cheap that way, one damaged that was really dirt cheap. Had a couple dents in it, but the ends were not soldered on so I was able to get inside and rub out the dents. Just enough remaining to be realistic once I get around to repainting it.

The only wood kit I bought on ebay was a Quality Craft auto rack, which is borderline OT for this list. It does represent an early 85' rack. My plan was always to build the car in plastic and just use the plans and castings. Whenever I get around to that project.

I've sold some Sunshine kits on ebay, the same way I always do - $5 minimum bid and no reserve. They did well, including a couple of Naperville giveaway minikits... well not exactly giveaway considering the price of admission but, I accumulated some I couldn't use and got surprising good money for them.

I've kept a few Sunshine kits that are borderline "boomer" era cars, or just a few too interesting to part with.

Ebay is about the best place to find about anything obscure. Think of the most obscure kit, part, manufacturer... and you'll probably get a hit.

Andy


Re: Friction Bearings

Geodyssey
 

Brad, I was just going to make the same reply, so I'll just tag on to yours.  I was in the operating (conductor, trainmaster) department and I worked with carmen & others that dealt directly with bearings.


I heard the term "soild bearing" maybe a few times.  The rest of the time it was "friction bearing".


If you, as a newbie car dept. or operation employee were to call them "solid bearings", you'd be suspected of being a "foamer".


So we have the bizzarre situation where most real railroaders use the "incorrect" term while railfans stand on the sidelines, gonna  school 'em.  (Similar to "switch" / "turnout", "engine" / "locomotive", etc.)


I've made this comment at least three times on different Yahoo groups, it never made a difference.  I fully expect non-railroader railfans to argue about this, again.  I'll keep calling them friction bearings.


Robert Simpson

ex-UP, Amtrak California, AC&J, PAR





---In STMFC@..., <corlissbs@...> wrote :

Not true. I was a real railroader and we used the term friction bearing. A common term in describing car trucks and repair of such. 

Brad Smith 

Sent from Brad's iPod

On Jun 4, 2016, at 2:52 AM, riverman_vt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Amen and thank you Tony. The term seems to have taken hold of model railroaders far 

more than it ever did with real railroaders and many of us, myself included, occasionally
slip up and use it.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: nice roof weathering

Steve Haas
 

<<A very interesting slide.>>

The weathering on the three roofs alone is enough to make it interesting:

1)      The effect on the car on the far right can be recreated using the tried and true “splotches of rubber cement” technique,

2)      The effect on the roof of the middle car can be replicated by a thin overspray of any appropriate dark color, but

3)      The edges of discoloration on the left car are far more subtle – perhaps a bit of paint on a rag for the stronger weathering, followed by a light overspray of grime/dust.  Anybody else have some suggestions?

 

Best regards,

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA


Re: e bay auctions

Stephen Bishop
 

I bought the Ambroid "box of sticks"  on ebay and it contains  everything I need to build a nice Pennsy  boxcar.

 

Steve Bishop 

 

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone

 

 

------ Original message------

From: ed_mines@... [STMFC]

Date: Sat, Jun 4, 2016 12:01 PM

To: STMFC@...;

Subject:[STMFC] e bay auctions

 

 

 

Does anyone have any experience buying freight car kits on e bay sold as "best offer"?


Some classic "junk" kits like the Ambroid ACF covered hopper kits are being offered, sometimes at premium prices. Screen roofwalks, ugh! Sealing the wood is no picnic these days either.


Every so often pretty nice kit built cars are offered. There's a nice, built up Gloor NYC caboose being offered now.


Ed Mines 


Re: nice roof weathering

mopacfirst
 

Notice the ACF proprietary roof on the Rock car....

Ron Merrick


Re: Rutland Wheel Reports - Reefers (was Re: NYC Covered Hoppers)

Ted Schnepf
 

Hi Eric,

in the 1/28 ORER is a detailed roster for DSDX

(note the lengths are inside, between bulkheads)

#90 to 94  32' 2"
300 to 999 30' 10"
1400-1899 no dimensions
2500-2599 20' 2" (20' is correct.  must be old, short cars)
50000-8999 32' 2"

There are no individual car quantities, only a total of 560 cars.  This is a new listing submitted 1/1928. 

Just checked 12/31 ORER and there are more class series listed,  but no quantities, not even a total car count.

Ted


At 01:48 PM 6/2/2016, you wrote:


My October 1926 ORER has the following notes for DSDX cars.
 
 
The refrigerator (M.C.B. designation RS) cars of this Company are marked Dairy Shippers Despatch and D.S.D.X., and numbered 200 to 999 inclusive; inside dimensions: length 30 ft. 10 in., width, 8 ft., 2 in., height 7 ft. 4 in., capacity, 1800 cu. ft., 60,000 pounds (ice bunker capacity 5800 pounds crushed ice, 4600 pounds chunk ice, 125 cu. ft. measure of capacity). Total, 240 cars.
 
This entry is dated July 1926.
 
 
There seems to be conflicting info here. The statement of numbered 200 to 999, inclusive does not mesh with the final note of, Total, 240 cars. Unless the company was receiving new reefers during this 1926 time and not all had been placed into service. Can anyone consult a 1927 or 1928 ORER for additional detail?
 
Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

Hello,

Just pulled a March 1925 ORER and DSDX is listed as Dairy Shippers Despatch and had cars numbered between 200 and 999, but no total was given for the cars in service.  1925 sure predates 1951, in the article quoted below.  As probation was on, maybe the cars actually shipped dairy products or at least "near milk" from brewers.

Ted

Rails Unlimited
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