Date   

Re: Closest paint match...CofG

Todd Horton
 

The C of G cars were brown (usually) in the 40's .

Todd Horton

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 6/27/16, 'Mike Brock' brockm@cfl.rr.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Closest paint match...CofG
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, June 27, 2016, 6:41 PM


 









The following message is forwarded to Don Valentine
from John Golden:



"You didn't mention your era. I have some color
photos of CofG trains circa

1951 with some CofG cars in the consist and I would
characterize the color

as Red Oxide. The cars stand out brightly in the consists.
If I were mixing

I'd start with Oxide Red (which is almost orange to my
eyes) and add red.



I used Scalecoat PRR FCC on a CofG model and after dullcote
the color was

too brown for my taste. Next time I will go with a more
orange/red combo.



Of course, throw some road grime and soot black on any car
and it turns up

like all the rest of them: Brown.



If you'd like me to scan and send the photos please let
me know.



John Golden













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Re: P2K Mather Stock Cars

Benjamin Hom
 

Francis A. Pehowic, Jr. asked:
"I have a number of these Mather stock cars.

C&NW
B&O
NP
GN
CB&Q

My question, which ones have enclosed ends and which ones have slatted ends?"

Definitely B&O and CB&Q, as shown in this Richard Hendrickson article in the May 1997 issue of Railmodel Journal:

Unfortunately, I'm unable to check his article in the February 1997 issue for the other cars on the Trainlife website as it's among those that are corrupted and will not load images.  I'm having doubts that they'll ever fix this.  This is why I'm hanging onto my paper copies. 


Ben Hom


Re: Caboose On End Of Train

mwbauers
 

On Jun 29, 2016, at 7:45 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Garth:


Unable to view any visual. If it was a short caboose, it was a "one or two of" and there is no kit

There are no kits of L&N Bay Window cabooses built in our era, either the wood or steel sheathed versions and I thought the questioner was looking for kit possibilities.

Bill Welch


What I see there is the strong possibility to take any model bay window caboose model produced in the last 30 years…..

Even a cast-off old shell…

And rebuild it to become that wanted caboose.

Splice and assemble two bodies into the single needed body if you wish.

The old body or full car is the bulk of the wanted ‘kit’. The majority of the rest of the ‘kit’ is common assorted sheet styrene or similar flat material.

It’s even more fun than just assembling a normal kit.


Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi


Re: P2K Mather Stock Cars

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

I take it that you have these cars. Just look at the ends.


From: 'Francis A. Pehowic, Jr.' rdgbuff56@... [STMFC] ;
To: Yahoo! Inc. ;
Subject: [STMFC] P2K Mather Stock Cars
Sent: Tue, Jun 28, 2016 10:45:53 PM



I have a number of these Mather stock cars.

C&NW
B&O
NP
GN
CB&Q

My question, which ones have enclosed ends and which ones have slatted ends.

Thanks for any help!
Francis A. Pehowic, Jr.
Sunbury, Pa.



Re: Caboose On End Of Train

Bill Welch
 

Garth:

Unable to view any visual. If it was a short caboose, it was a "one or two of" and there is no kit

There are no kits of L&N Bay Window cabooses built in our era, either the wood or steel sheathed versions and I thought the questioner was looking for kit possibilities.

Bill Welch


Re: Steam Locomotives

William Sharpe <wsharpe1@...>
 

Good morning Hugh,

I would be interested in receiving an e-mail listing of your offerings.

Thank you in advance.

Bill

William H. Sharpe

Hamilton, Ontario

Canada







From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2016 2:17 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Steam Locomotives





Those who model steam era freight cars need steam era locomotives to pull them. I have sale lists of NYC and NKP HO-scale brass steam available now with lists of B&O, Erie, DL&W, LV and PRR forthcoming as time permits. I will send the lists via e-mail - way too long to post here. Hugh T Guillaume


Re: Caboose On End Of Train

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Bill,

This SBD car was ex-L&N. It still had the L&N safety herald. Maybe it isn't short, but just looks that way because of the two blanked out windows. Photo was taken here in Charlottesville, VA on the old C&O Mountain Division about the time of the CSX formation, say 1990 at the latest.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 6/28/16 6:50 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

I have several photos of L&N (and NC&StL) bay window cabooses and none of them are "short." Anyway you can share photos of short bay window cabooses with me Garth?


Bill Welch


Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

Robert kirkham
 

Well, in a pinch I’ve used a door hinge as a vice and a razor blade to fold over the part.  Worked well enough.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2016 9:50 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

 




Having purchased a set of Yarmouth ladders for one car, I am distressed at the suggestions to buy a $40 jig to bend them!  This is going to push the cost of this one kitbash to the cost of a loco!  (I already purchased a NWSL True Sander for this bash, but I can justify the cost because I will use it for future builds.)  I don't think that I am going to retrofit my entire fleet with Yarmouth ladders, so I'm loath to spend the cash to bend a total of 4 ladders. 

I was of a similar mindset with respect to $40 tweezers (I bought a set of Tamiya craft tweezers for something like $13, and consider that a fair price).  Some people build more cars than I do, or have more disposable income than I do, and can justify spending the money. 

So, along the same lines, while I can justify spending $3.00 on a set of ladders, I can't justify $40 on a bender for that one set.  I'm sure that I could find a resin kit to spend that money on.  What do people recommend I do for just these 4 ladders?  Is it not worth even trying? 

 

Dean Payne





Re: Caboose On End Of Train

Tony Thompson
 

Garth Groff wrote:

 
Since you are looking for plastic, your choices are rather bit limited. The Athearn car is probably your best choice. It more or less represents an SP prototype circa 1954, though lots of other roads had similar cabooses.

      Actually, it's a 1960 SP caboose, though kitbashable (not simply) to represent 1950s classes.

 If you could find one, Silver Streak used to offer a wood and metal SP bay window car, and they also offered a converted boxcar with bays. 

       That Silver Streak bay window car is not only oversize (like many Silver Streak cars), but represents a single experimental SP car. I'm not aware of any other railroad which did the same. But Garth may know of some.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Caboose On End Of Train

Todd Sullivan
 

There are a lot of cabooses available in kit form from American Model Builders at LASERkit Splash Page

 

If you go to their home page, click on HO and then on Cabooses, you can just scroll though the list.  There are a few short bay window cabooses and lots of other interesting types.

Todd Sullivan
Liverpool, NY


Re: Caboose On End Of Train

Bill Welch
 

I have several photos of L&N (and NC&StL) bay window cabooses and none of them are "short." Anyway you can share photos of short bay window cabooses with me Garth?

Bill Welch


P2K Mather Stock Cars

rdgbuff56
 

I have a number of these Mather stock cars.

C&NW
B&O
NP
GN
CB&Q

My question, which ones have enclosed ends and which ones have slatted ends.

Thanks for any help!
Francis A. Pehowic, Jr.
Sunbury, Pa.


Re: Caboose On End Of Train

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Rich,

Since you are looking for plastic, your choices are rather bit limited. The Athearn car is probably your best choice. It more or less represents an SP prototype circa 1954, though lots of other roads had similar cabooses. The kits are now rare, but assembled cars are easy to find at swap meets. Model Power has a somewhat shorter, and much cruder, bay window caboose from the Marx train set line. The only short-length caboose like this I can think of was an L&N car. Walthers has done many short runs of cabooses with nice detail, but the only bay window I ever noticed was a Milwaukee horizontal rib car. That may be a bit too road specific for your tastes.

If you could find one, Silver Streak used to offer a wood and metal SP bay window car, and they also offered a converted boxcar with bays. This car was also offered in plastic from Tru-Scale, Train Miniature and Walthers. They turn up at swap meets, and would make a very interesting caboose that could be detailed to your tastes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 6/28/16 4:31 PM, richramik@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Bruce:

Well put.  I would be looking for the model(s) that best represent the prototype being modeled.

"Believable" good choice as well.

Thanks, Rich Ramik
 
 
On 06/27/16, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
 

Rich,


Are you asking what is the best detailed HO plastic bay window caboose?  Or which one best represents whatever prototype it represents?  Because those two may not be exactly the same thing.


Since you have chosen not to model a prototype, nothing you do is "prototypical". Perhaps a better word might be believable?  


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL




From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of richramik@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, June 27, 2016 7:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Caboose On End Of Train
 


I am modeling fall of 1955 and I am proto-lancing.  All of the equipment I use must be based on some prototype that was in use during that time period, i.e., new or reaching the end of the service life, etc. 

On my freight trains (mandatory content) there will be a caboose as per agreements with the union.  For a part of the hack fleet, I will be using the ubiquitous Northeast Caboose.  However, I would also like to use a bay window caboose as well. 

I am looking for suggestions as to what would be prototypical and available in plastic that I could use.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Rich Ramik






Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

tyesac@...
 

Dean,

Why not rig up your own temporary jig to clamp/grip one side of the bend?   I would think some beefy cross section plastic having a straight edge ought to get the job done.

Tom Casey 
So, along the same lines, while I can justify spending $3.00 on a set of ladders, I can't justify $40 on a bender for that one set.  I'm sure that I could find a resin kit to spend t! hat money on.  What do people recommend I do for just these 4 ladders?  Is it not worth even trying?  
Dean Payne



-----Original Message-----
From: 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Jun 28, 2016 1:24 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

 
Dean,

Given the amount of photo-etch now appearing in our models I consider this a good excuse to buy a new tool :)  You can’t have too many tools!!  However, as others have noted, you also don’t need the etch-buddy tool to make good bends, it just helps… and looks cool too.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jun 28, 2016, at 11:50 AM, STMFC@... wrote:

Having purchased a set of Yarmouth ladders for one car, I am distressed at the suggestions to buy a $40 jig to bend them!  This is going to push the cost of this one kitbash to the cost of a loco!  (I already purchased a NWSL True Sander for this bash, but I can justify the cost because I will use it for future builds.)  I don't think that I am going to retrofit my entire fleet with Yarmouth ladders, so I'm loath to spend the cash to bend a total of 4 ladders.  
I was of a similar mindset with respect to $40 tweezers (I bought a set of Tamiya craft tweezers for something like $13, and consider that a fair price).  Some people build more cars than I do, or have more disposable income than I do, and can justify spending the money.  
So, along the same lines, while I can justify spending $3.00 on a set of ladders, I can't justify $40 on a bender for that one set.  I'm sure that I could find a resin kit to spend t! hat money on.  What do people recommend I do for just these 4 ladders?  Is it not worth even trying?  
Dean Payne


Re: Caboose On End Of Train

richramik@...
 

Bruce:

Well put.  I would be looking for the model(s) that best represent the prototype being modeled.

"Believable" good choice as well.

Thanks, Rich Ramik
 
 

On 06/27/16, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
 

Rich,


Are you asking what is the best detailed HO plastic bay window caboose?  Or which one best represents whatever prototype it represents?  Because those two may not be exactly the same thing.


Since you have chosen not to model a prototype, nothing you do is "prototypical". Perhaps a better word might be believable?  


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL




From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of richramik@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, June 27, 2016 7:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Caboose On End Of Train
 


I am modeling fall of 1955 and I am proto-lancing.  All of the equipment I use must be based on some prototype that was in use during that time period, i.e., new or reaching the end of the service life, etc. 

On my freight trains (mandatory content) there will be a caboose as per agreements with the union.  For a part of the hack fleet, I will be using the ubiquitous Northeast Caboose.  However, I would also like to use a bay window caboose as well. 

I am looking for suggestions as to what would be prototypical and available in plastic that I could use.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Rich Ramik





Help, I need parts

no1detail@...
 

Does any body have a pair of Details Associates Radiator Frame & Screen for the EMD SW #2709.  I have been looking for a pair of these and can't find any.  If you have them and are will to part with them I need them.

Thank you
Steven E. Cerka



Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

Bruce Smith
 

Dean,

Given the amount of photo-etch now appearing in our models I consider this a good excuse to buy a new tool :)  You can’t have too many tools!!  However, as others have noted, you also don’t need the etch-buddy tool to make good bends, it just helps… and looks cool too.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jun 28, 2016, at 11:50 AM, STMFC@... wrote:

Having purchased a set of Yarmouth ladders for one car, I am distressed at the suggestions to buy a $40 jig to bend them!  This is going to push the cost of this one kitbash to the cost of a loco!  (I already purchased a NWSL True Sander for this bash, but I can justify the cost because I will use it for future builds.)  I don't think that I am going to retrofit my entire fleet with Yarmouth ladders, so I'm loath to spend the cash to bend a total of 4 ladders.  

I was of a similar mindset with respect to $40 tweezers (I bought a set of Tamiya craft tweezers for something like $13, and consider that a fair price).  Some people build more cars than I do, or have more disposable income than I do, and can justify spending the money.  

So, along the same lines, while I can justify spending $3.00 on a set of ladders, I can't justify $40 on a bender for that one set.  I'm sure that I could find a resin kit to spend t! hat money on.  What do people recommend I do for just these 4 ladders?  Is it not worth even trying?  

Dean Payne


Steam Locomotives

 

Those who model steam era freight cars need steam era locomotives to pull them.  I have sale lists of NYC and NKP HO-scale brass steam available now with lists of B&O, Erie, DL&W, LV and PRR forthcoming as time permits. I will send the lists via e-mail - way too long to post here.   Hugh T Guillaume


Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

Paul Doggett <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Dean 

A 6"steel rule to clamp the etch and a single edge razor blade to fold the etch to 90 degrees. I have used this method and it works.

On Tue, 28 Jun, 2016 at 17:50, 1payne1@... [STMFC]
wrote:
 

Having purchased a set of Yarmouth ladders for one car, I am distressed at the suggestions to buy a $40 jig to bend them!  This is going to push the cost of this one kitbash to the cost of a loco!  (I already purchased a NWSL True Sander for this bash, but I can justify the cost because I will use it for future builds.)  I don't think that I am going to retrofit my entire fleet with Yarmouth ladders, so I'm loath to spend the cash to bend a total of 4 ladders. 

I was of a similar mindset with respect to $40 tweezers (I bought a set of Tamiya craft tweezers for something like $13, and consider that a fair price).  Some people build more cars than I do, or have more disposable income than I do, and can justify spending the money. 

So, along the same lines, while I can justify spending $3.00 on a set of ladders, I can't justify $40 on a bender for that one set.  I'm sure that I could find a resin kit to spend that money on.  What do people recommend I do for just these 4 ladders?  Is it not worth even trying? 


Dean Payne


Re: MORE ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

Pierre Oliver
 

Dean,

The ladders that are sold separate from the kits are etched in brass and as a result are a lot softer than the phosphor bronze that is included in the kits. The brass stiles can be folded with a metal straight edge and a single edge razor

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/28/16 12:50 PM, 1payne1@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Having purchased a set of Yarmouth ladders for one car, I am distressed at the suggestions to buy a $40 jig to bend them!  This is going to push the cost of this one kitbash to the cost of a loco!  (I already purchased a NWSL True Sander for this bash, but I can justify the cost because I will use it for future builds.)  I don't think that I am going to retrofit my entire fleet with Yarmouth ladders, so I'm loath to spend the cash to bend a total of 4 ladders. 

I was of a similar mindset with respect to $40 tweezers (I bought a set of Tamiya craft tweezers for something like $13, and consider that a fair price).  Some people build more cars than I do, or have more disposable income than I do, and can justify spending the money. 

So, along the same lines, while I can justify spending $3.00 on a set of ladders, I can't justify $40 on a bender for that one set.  I'm sure that I could find a resin kit to spend that money on.  What do people recommend I do for just these 4 ladders?  Is it not worth even trying? 


Dean Payne


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