Date   

Re: Weathered box cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Coarse dry brushes over a recent wash or wet brushes, both with pigments,
dry sponges, micro brushes (wet or dry), and sometimes just my finger...
whatever it takes. I like to mix it up. Also I find that doing less at one
time is better than trying to do it all at once. Some cars I have revisited
several times over a period of years.

To paraphrase Dory "just keep weathering"

Tim O'

I'm sorry to disappoint you but no airbrushes were used to weather these models. I can't recall how broad or long the brushes were for the wash applications. I'm away from home for a few days and can't peek around my work areas.

Micro brushes were used to streak PanPastels. Sponges were used to apply broader PanPastel applications.

Eric Hansmann


Reefers At Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Below is a link to two photos from the USC Digital Archives, titled "Suicide on Super Chief, 1958":

 

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll44/id/56099/rec/1116

 

Use the photo legend to the right to shift between the images and use the sliders above the images to enlarge the photos.

 

While not the main subject of the of the photos, both show what appear to be refrigerator cars next to the passenger car. One is a PFE reefer and the other is a Santa Fe reefer.

 

While it may not be unusual for refrigerator cars to be in a passenger terminal to provide ice for passenger cars (dining service or certain air conditioning systems), I understand the Southern Pacific had its own small fleet of refrigerator cars for this purpose and SP did not rely on PFE cars.

 

So is this a rare exception for SP or was the car there possibly for some other purpose?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Weathered box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

Bill, 

I'm sorry to disappoint you but no airbrushes were used to weather these models. I can't recall how broad or long the brushes were for the wash applications. I'm away from home for a few days and can't peek around my work areas.  

Micro brushes were used to streak PanPastels. Sponges were used to apply broader PanPastel applications. 

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

On Jul 29, 2016, at 12:59 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Eric, are your "washes" applied with a brush or an airbrush?

I really appreciate the variations, well done!

Bill Welch


Re: Weathered box cars

Peter Hall
 

Outstanding weathering work, Eric!

For those of us interested, could you elaborate on how you do a “wash”?  Your weathering uses several washes, and it would be very useful to know how you do it.  The choices of paint, solvent, brush or airbrush, and technique are all subjects I’d be interested in knowing.

Many thanks
Pete





On Jul 29, 2016, at 9:24 AM, Eric Hansmann eric@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Weathering tips have returned to the DesignBuildOp blog. Seven box cars have rolled out of the weathering factory and are ready for service. Check it out! 




Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX



Re: Weathered box cars

Bill Welch
 

Eric, are your "washes" applied with a brush or an airbrush?

I really appreciate the variations, well done!

Bill Welch


Re: Smaller Files

Dennis Storzek
 

A few more sources for smaller files, diamond files, and handles.

Someone sent me a link to a file handle on the Gesswein that appears to have a collet nut so should tighten nicely around the smooth shanks of the short diamond files made for the reciprocating tools:
Needle File Handle

 


I buy a lot of stuff from Plastic Process Equipment, here are their offerings for both needle files and diamond files, note they also have a clamp-on handle for two different size round shanks:
Plastic Process Equipment, Inc.

 

I don't know if that link will go directly to the page, but the files start on page 296.

Here is the small file handle I really like; PFERD #16174, available from multiple sources, but here's one with a pic:
http://www.toolfetch.com/pferd-16174-quick-mount-file-handle-sh-220-for-needle-diamond-and-small-files.html

Dennis Storzek


Weathered box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

Weathering tips have returned to the DesignBuildOp blog. Seven box cars have rolled out of the weathering factory and are ready for service. Check it out! 




Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


Re: Smaller Files

A&Y Dave in MD
 

My favorite tool for this flash removal is the DuoSharp diamond bench stone that Jack Burgess mentioned (I think, I give him credit for many high quality tool recommendations due to his MRH column).

I have found sales and good prices in many locations but I compare to Amazon's prices as a benchmark: 

Dave
Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jul 29, 2016, at 1:22 AM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I would caution using a back side of a blade to scrape off flash on a resin stock car side. If you think about it, flash is an thickness extension of the resin part, rising above the area where the pattern ended. I simply sand down the sides carefully over plate glass until the flash just disappears. You will get uncompromised board edges and the boards will be true thickness.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "lucas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 6:30 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files

 
I've been working on a few Westerfield stock cars.  I prefer to sand the sides a bit per Jack's method, then drag a scalpel blade BACKWARDS along the edges of the "boards".  The sharp edge of the back of the blade  defines and squares off the boards as well as cutting the flash off.  The same can be done with the back of an X-Acto no. 11 blade.

Steve Lucas



Wire Corner Grabs added to Tichy Steel roof walks (#3077)

O Fenton Wells
 

This is a request for help, has anyone added wire corner grabs to the lateral steel Tichy roof walks?  I would love to know how you did it.  I have an idea but am willing to learn from the masters.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions

Fenton


Re: WE LIVE IN AN AGE OF TOO MUCH INFORMATION

Charles Peck
 

In such times I remind myself that perfection is the enemy of progress.   I think of my operating roster
like a Cecil B. DeMille production.  A few stars and a supporting cast of thousands. Not every L&N
hopper is going to get a blue ribbon.  In fact, none of them will.
Chuck Peck 

On Fri, Jul 29, 2016 at 12:03 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


Just when I have solved my brake wheel problem on the SP A-50-16 auto car I recieved the PDF of Ted Cuylotta's Volume 4 of Focus
On Freight Cars. Another exscellent publication and in it is a section on the Western Pacific 1937 box car. This is another car in my
pipeline and with this artice it moves up in priority. Wouldn't you know that this car like the A-50-16 uses a Universal hand brake.
So there go the brake wheels on my two ART refers. If tht isn't enough the WP car also uses tha Royal brake regulator. There goes
the last of the brass castngs tht I had made up a few years ago.

I have to stop reading and just model!

Bill Pardie



Re: GATC Tank Car Advice

SUVCWORR@...
 

This beginning to sound like the Varney tank car.  Varney did have a solid one piece underframe.  However, to the best of my knowledge all Varney underframes were clearly marked as such with the name Varney in the center channel.

Rich Orr

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff sarahsan@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jul 28, 2016 09:27 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] GATC Tank Car Advice




Tony and Tom,

No, I don't think my two cars are Mantua, though construction is similar. The mystery cars are much better detailed (rivets pressed right into the steel tank instead of a paper wrapper and they were fully painted). They are in no way like the actual Mantua car that started all this (it is a Mantua, still in original box with instructions). None of the parts match, something that you would expect even with retooling.

Construction is similar to an Athearn, but again, the parts don't match up. For instance, the Athearn 40' tank had separate end castings and a pressed steel center sill (I still have a set of these parts in my scrap box). My mystery cars have the entire underframe cast in one piece. Could Athearn have done a major retooling of the Globe parts? When I was a youngster I had both Athearn and early Globe metal boxcars, and they were quite different.

Yours Aye,


Garth


On 7/28/16 7:12 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Tom Madden wrote:

 
Could Garth's tank be a Globe? They made one- and two-dome tank car kits back in the day. This should be right up Denny's alley.

   I don't think so. Globe made a 12,000-gallon car and a 10,000-gallon car, along with a "shorty" 10,000-gallon fat tank, all single-dome and with prototype size large domes. These were subsequently sold by Athearn after 1948.
     I wonder about Mantua, when they made a tank car with a metal shell. My triple-compartment car has Mantua couplers which exactly fit in a narrow coupler box (Mantua couplers did not need to swivel, because they had such a large gathering range).

Tony Thompson






Re: Smaller Files

Andy Carlson
 

I would caution using a back side of a blade to scrape off flash on a resin stock car side. If you think about it, flash is an thickness extension of the resin part, rising above the area where the pattern ended. I simply sand down the sides carefully over plate glass until the flash just disappears. You will get uncompromised board edges and the boards will be true thickness.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "lucas@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 6:30 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files

 
I've been working on a few Westerfield stock cars.  I prefer to sand the sides a bit per Jack's method, then drag a scalpel blade BACKWARDS along the edges of the "boards".  The sharp edge of the back of the blade  defines and squares off the boards as well as cutting the flash off.  The same can be done with the back of an X-Acto no. 11 blade.

Steve Lucas



Re: Smaller Files

Tom Madden
 

Tim wrote:

> About a zillion years ago there was a magazine article that mentioned
> a file at a particular hardware store in Boulder Colorado. When I visited
> the city I went to that store and got the file - absolutely my favorite
> tool ever, I've used it for 20 years. perfectly flat, square edges, with
> one blind slide like Andy's file - which I agree is a wonderful feature.
> on a second visit to Boulder I bought an extra one just in case!
>
> how good is it? it's hard enough to file steel, but gentle enough that I
> can EASILY file down the rivets on an Athearn tank car body without any
> gouges or scratches and leave the body perfectly smooth - it cuts that
> Athearn plastic like butter.


Bob Schleicher, editor of RAIL MODEL JOURNAL, wrote the article. He lived in Boulder and touted that file. It's a Simonds 10" laminate file:

Gundlach No. 10-AP Simonds 10 All Purpose File : Floorz-N-More, Your Complete Flooring Needs Flooring|Tools|Supplies

I use it for rough cleanup of resin castings and am on my third one.


The hardware store is McGuckin's, which is right next to the hotel where Tim stayed. It's a fantastic hardware store, really worth visiting, but you can get those files elsewhere too.


Tom Madden


WE LIVE IN AN AGE OF TOO MUCH INFORMATION

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Just when I have solved my brake wheel problem on the SP A-50-16 auto car I recieved the PDF of Ted Cuylotta's Volume 4 of Focus
On Freight Cars. Another exscellent publication and in it is a section on the Western Pacific 1937 box car. This is another car in my
pipeline and with this artice it moves up in priority. Wouldn't you know that this car like the A-50-16 uses a Universal hand brake.
So there go the brake wheels on my two ART refers. If tht isn't enough the WP car also uses tha Royal brake regulator. There goes
the last of the brass castngs tht I had made up a few years ago.

I have to stop reading and just model!

Bill Pardie


URECO HANDBRAKE

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Subsequent to my exercise earlier in the week to identify the proper handbrake for the Southern Pacific A-50-16 auto car I found
that I actually had a couple of Deail Associates Ureco Handbrakes in my stash. Does anyone know what cars mighgt have used
this particular wheel?

Bill P:ardie


Re: Smaller Files

midrly
 

I've been working on a few Westerfield stock cars.  I prefer to sand the sides a bit per Jack's method, then drag a scalpel blade BACKWARDS along the edges of the "boards".  The sharp edge of the back of the blade  defines and squares off the boards as well as cutting the flash off.  The same can be done with the back of an X-Acto no. 11 blade.

Steve Lucas


Re: Adventures in Finding Small Files—an u pdate

riverman_vt@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <lnnrr152@...> wrote :

Bill, perhaps watchmakers use the terms differently but as a machinist, reamers and broaches work differently.
Both modify the size or shape of a hole but a reamer cuts with a rotary action. A broach is pushed or pulled
through a hole cutting in a linear fashion. 
At least this is true of all that I have used.  I now expect someone to come up with the exception.
Chuck Peck    

Hi Chuck,

    I'd be surprised to hear of an exception because the way you have described the difference is exactly
the way I have heard and understood the issues all my life as well.

Cordially, Don Valentine



Re: GATC Tank Car Advice

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tony and Tom,

No, I don't think my two cars are Mantua, though construction is similar. The mystery cars are much better detailed (rivets pressed right into the steel tank instead of a paper wrapper and they were fully painted). They are in no way like the actual Mantua car that started all this (it is a Mantua, still in original box with instructions). None of the parts match, something that you would expect even with retooling.

Construction is similar to an Athearn, but again, the parts don't match up. For instance, the Athearn 40' tank had separate end castings and a pressed steel center sill (I still have a set of these parts in my scrap box). My mystery cars have the entire underframe cast in one piece. Could Athearn have done a major retooling of the Globe parts? When I was a youngster I had both Athearn and early Globe metal boxcars, and they were quite different.

Yours Aye,


Garth


On 7/28/16 7:12 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] wrote:
�
Tom Madden wrote:

�
Could Garth's tank be a Globe? They made one- and two-dome tank car kits back in the day. This should be right up Denny's alley.

� �I don't think so. Globe made a 12,000-gallon car and a 10,000-gallon car, along with a "shorty" 10,000-gallon fat tank, all single-dome and with prototype size large domes. These were subsequently sold by Athearn after 1948.
� � �I wonder about Mantua, when they made a tank car with a metal shell. My triple-compartment car has Mantua couplers which exactly fit in a narrow coupler box (Mantua couplers did not need to swivel, because they had such a large gathering range).

Tony Thompson




Re: Adventures in Finding Small Files—an update

watchmeister <watchmeister@...>
 

Hi all

  I have worked  as a  watchmaker, and my broaches all work in a rotary fashion. Broaches are also slightly tapered,  so you have to use it from both sides of the hole to get straight sides. It could not be drawn through a hole without twisting.

Cheers 

Ed Holler 



Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


-------- Original message --------
From: "Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date: 7/28/16 6:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Adventures in Finding Small Files—an update

 

Bill, perhaps watchmakers use the terms differently but as a machinist, reamers and broaches work differently.
Both modify the size or shape of a hole but a reamer cuts with a rotary action. A broach is pushed or pulled
through a hole cutting in a linear fashion. 
At least this is true of all that I have used.  I now expect someone to come up with the exception.
Chuck Peck 

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 4:15 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
​ 

As a bonus I have also seen some really small reamers or broaches using the term watchmakers use.


Bill Welch



Re: GATC Tank Car Advice

Allan Smith
 

I also have one of those three dome tank cars. It is lettered UTLX 1252. The 1955 Tank Book shows UTLX 1252 as a 6500 gal tank car, but the model is at least a 10000 gal tank car, per Tonys formula. I have searched old Model Railroader ads from the MR disk and can't find any ads that match the kit, I also searched hoseeker for any instruction sheets that would match the kit and I couldn't find anything.. I also have old metal Athearn, Thomas, Mantua, G F Menzies kits and it doesn't match any of them. If anyone on this list can provide an answer I think all owners would appreciate the info.

Al Smith
Sonora CA


On Thursday, July 28, 2016 4:13 PM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Tom Madden wrote:

 
Could Garth's tank be a Globe? They made one- and two-dome tank car kits back in the day. This should be right up Denny's alley.

   I don't think so. Globe made a 12,000-gallon car and a 10,000-gallon car, along with a "shorty" 10,000-gallon fat tank, all single-dome and with prototype size large domes. These were subsequently sold by Athearn after 1948.
     I wonder about Mantua, when they made a tank car with a metal shell. My triple-compartment car has Mantua couplers which exactly fit in a narrow coupler box (Mantua couplers did not need to swivel, because they had such a large gathering range).

Tony Thompson





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