Date   

Stock car sanding

Andy Carlson
 

Aside from some verbose model construction articles which guides one's hands through every step, we are otherwise on our own for the techniques needed to achieve the desired results.

I don't glue my sand paper to the glass surface as I find it not necessary, though I do check my sanding progress often. The light pressure of my fleshy fingers on the face of the stock car side seems to be sufficient for my purposes. I do use a coarser grit than has been recommended, as I don't want this to be a tedious endeavor.

I am fortunate to have been mentored on auto body work as a very young adult. The lessons I learned were numerous, and one which has helped me in modeling is using  a cross-hatch pattern of sanding. Any side (or end) which is being sanded gets a few diagonal left-to-right upwards passes followed by an equal number of downward passes. This creates visible cross-hatch patterns from the sanding operation, but most importantly, it evenly spreads the work so nothing gets too thin while other less worked areas remain thick.

As I stated earlier, flash is an over-thickening of a part. If a novice resin builder simply removes flash from an end, the finished car body will show the imperfections as if it were spot lighted. Simply using a shearing action to remove flash leaves the finished part overly thick, such as on the back side of the end. This is not a problem for an underframe, because the over-thickness is concealed inside the car body.

I like the delight of seeing the final thin whisks of flash simply float away when the back-side of the stock car casting is sanded down.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: "NEW " Dates

Tim O'Connor
 


 > Why is it that manufacturers of Freight Cars continue to produce otherwise
 > excellent models with a "New  date"  instead of a realistic reweigh date ?
 > Armand Premo

Armand

Because in most cases, there is ONLY ONE correct "new" date, but there could be
hundreds of possible other shop date AND shop location permutations. Moreover,
this is one of the easiest lettering changes to make on any model! Just add a
strip of color trim film (to cover up the NEW xx-xx) and then add a new stencil
over that. Voila!

Of course, finding DECALS for the replacement stencils... don't get me started.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Westerfield stock car sanding

tyesac@...
 

Gary,

I've used either a piece of granite tile or thick piece of plate glass as the flattening surface.  As for the abrasive, I have a few grades  (200 thru 400) of automotive wet/dry paper to do the cutting,  I haven't found the need to glue it down first.  As for maintaining an even result, I apply pressure to one or two panels at a time and check my progress frequently.  Rotating the piece also helps even out any possible "wedging" due to inconsistent hand motion.   As soon as the flash is tissue paper thin, a tip of an Exacto #11 blade has an easy time of cleaning out what remains. 

I learned the hard way about sanding to far, I have a Sunshine Santa Fe  Sk-U that has several random slats that are now replaced by Evergreen 2" x 6" strip.  

 I've also noticed that the doors are way more delicate than the sides are.  

Tom Casey   
I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.
 
Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?
 
Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.
 
Thanks,
Gary Ray



-----Original Message-----
From: 'Gary Ray' gerber1926@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Jul 29, 2016 2:56 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding

 
Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,
 
I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.
 
Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?
 
Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.
 
Thanks,
Gary Ray


Re: "NEW " Dates

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <armprem@...> wrote :

Why is it that manufacturers of Freight Cars continue to produce otherwise excellent models with a "New  date"  instead of a realistic reweigh date ? Armand Premo   
=============

Because it makes the factory applied lettering the most useful to the widest range of modelers. Some people want to model the car as it appeared within the first three years of its life. Those who want to model it later in life can easily paint over the re-weigh date; it doesn't even have to match as patch paints were common. you can even use small bits of pre-painted decal. On the other hand, if there is a later date pre-printed on the car, putting NEW on a painted patch is not going to look realistic.

The only time we don't pre-print the NEW date is when we're doing a later scheme that the car didn't wear when it was new. Then we try to use a date that's correct for the scheme (normally the date and symbol that shows in the photo.)

Dennis, Accurail


Re: Westerfield stock car sanding

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Gary, I’ve built 24 of the flat kit Sunshine SM-18 stock cars, and after the first attempt as sanding where I damaged two slats, I changed course. As an aside, you can fix a few damaged slats with Evergreen styrene HO scale lumber matched to the board size of the slats. Be sure to use course sandpaper to approximate the wood grain of the original castings. When the car is painted, you can’t find the replaced boards. Now, for my method. I use a single edge razor blade to trim around the edges of the sides, and a #11 X-acto blade to remove the flash from the slats, working slowly and carefully to avoid knife damage to the slats. After the slats are clear, I run the point of the blade along the top and bottom of each slat to remove any residual flash. Then, and only then, do I lightly sand the backs of the sides to remove any residual plastic fuzz. I inspect the sides in good light for any remaining flash. I haven’t built a Westerfield stock car yet, though I have a RI kit in the stash.



I have a 14 x 18 piece of smooth tile (think counter top material) that perfectly flat. I tape three half sheets of sandpaper to the tile, 100, 220, and 400 grit. I start with the 100 and work down to 400. I try to keep an even pressure on the part, though with a large part like a side, I don’t have enough fingers. Avoid too much finger pressure as you slide the part on the sandpaper, and move you hand position to keep the back side as even as possible. I bought a diamond sharpening stone from Woodcraft upon Jack Burgess’ recommendation, and I use it for squaring car parts, but I finished all my stock cars before I got it so I can’t comment about sanding slats.



Bottom line is minimal downward pressure and mostly horizontal movement – let the sandpaper do the work as the part slides lightly across the surface. Use slow long strokes rather than rapid short strokes. Good luck.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 2:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding





Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,



I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars. I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.



Do you glue the grit down to the glass? What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting? Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)? Grade of sandpaper?



Any and all help greatly appreciated. I do not want to ruin another set of sides.



Thanks,

Gary Ray





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: "NEW " Dates

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Armand,

Maybe because they work from builder's photos?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 7/29/16 4:46 PM, Armand Premo armprem@... [STMFC] wrote:

 
Why is it that manufacturers of Freight Cars continue to produce otherwise excellent models with a "New  date"  instead of a realistic reweigh date ? Armand Premo    


Re: Westerfield stock car sanding

Bruce Smith
 

Let me add, go slow and PAY ATTENTION. I managed to sand through a board on a resin NP car from Aaron Gjermundson with a few careless strokes. Of course, when I get back to that kit, the salvage is going to be to patch the bard with a fresh board to make it look like a repair in transit!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Jul 29, 2016, at 4:05 PM, STMFC@... wrote:

Nothing I can add to Bill’s summary. I have a couple of pieces of plate glass with the edges ground. They give a nice level surface for things like this plus soldering together white metal trucks…



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 12:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding







Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,



I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars. I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.



Do you glue the grit down to the glass? What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting? Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)? Grade of sandpaper?



Any and all help greatly appreciated. I do not want to ruin another set of sides.



Thanks,

Gary Ray


Re: "NEW " Dates

Brian Carlson
 

Why is one more realistic than the other? Depends on the era modeling. I have both for my August 57 era. A car built in July 1957 would have new. 

Brian J. Carlson

On Jul 29, 2016, at 4:46 PM, Armand Premo armprem@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Why is it that manufacturers of Freight Cars continue to produce otherwise excellent models with a "New  date"  instead of a realistic reweigh date ? Armand Premo    


Re: Avoiding Switching Charges (ATSF 126439)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

I was being facetious, Jack.

 

Bob


Re: "NEW " Dates

Allen Ferguson
 

If you were to check Yarmouth model's kits the decal sheets have 10-15 different reweigh dates and locations to cover the life of the paint scheme.
Allen Ferguson


Re: Westerfield stock car sanding

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Nothing I can add to Bill’s summary. I have a couple of pieces of plate glass with the edges ground. They give a nice level surface for things like this plus soldering together white metal trucks…



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 12:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding








Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,



I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars. I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.



Do you glue the grit down to the glass? What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting? Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)? Grade of sandpaper?



Any and all help greatly appreciated. I do not want to ruin another set of sides.



Thanks,

Gary Ray


Re: Westerfield stock car sanding

Bill Welch
 

Yes sandpaper needs to be secured to glass, spray adhesive handy for this. As I do this I make sure to rotate the casting so the sanding goes as evenly as possible. Go SLOWLY and check often using firm finger pressure. Did I already say check often. I would not use anything courser than 340 Grit, 400 is a good choice I think.

I accidentally broke my glass recently, a scrap .5 inches thick. I had had 20 years.

Bill Welch


Re: COUPLER BOX FASTENERS

Tim O'Connor
 


Hi Bill

A minor nitpick - 00-90 is not .090 (OD is .044) and 0-80 is not .080 (OD is .060)

Nice SP stock car by the way. Westerfield?

:-)



I have exhausted my modeling time for the morning and now it is back to the real world.  I have one item that I want to share first.
About a year ago there was a discussion on this list concerning screws for coupler box fasteners.  I came out of this with a reference
to a Hex Socket Head  Cap Screw.  I bought some in the .090 size and set them aside.  This mnorning's task was to install coupler
boxes on some of the resin cars in the pipeline.  WHAT A DIFFERENCE IN APPEARANCE THESE MAKE.  When viewed from the
side of the car you only see a slightgstem as opposed to an obvious screw head.  I am going to see if these are availab le in 2-56
for truck screws.

Bill Pardie


"NEW " Dates

Armand Premo
 

Why is it that manufacturers of Freight Cars continue to produce otherwise excellent models with a "New  date"  instead of a realistic reweigh date ? Armand Premo    


Re: Weathered box cars

Chuck Cover
 

Great job Eric.  Could you explain what you use for route tags?  Do you just make them yourself?  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Westerfield stock car sanding

Gary Ray
 

Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,

 

I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.

 

Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?

 

Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.

 

Thanks,

Gary Ray


Re: Avoiding Switching Charges (ATSF 126439)

Jack Mullen
 

Bob Chaparro said:

  >Apparently this is one person's approach to avoiding switching charges:

More likely, it's a staged photo session to advertise the pulling power of the '34 Hudson.

Jack Mullen


COUPLER BOX SCREWS - CORRECTION

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Sorry the screw size is .080.

Bill Pardie


COUPLER BOX FASTENERS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I have exhausted my modeling time for the morning and now it is back to the real world. I have one item that I want to share first.
About a year ago there was a discussion on this list concerning screws for coupler box fasteners. I came out of this with a reference
to a Hex Socket Head Cap Screw. I bought some in the .090 size and set them aside. This mnorning's task was to install coupler
boxes on some of the resin cars in the pipeline. WHAT A DIFFERENCE IN APPEARANCE THESE MAKE. When viewed from the
side of the car you only see a slightgstem as opposed to an obvious screw head. I am going to see if these are availab le in 2-56
for truck screws.

Bill Pardie


Avoiding Switching Charges (ATSF 126439)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This is another photo from the USC Digital Library (http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/ ).

 

Apparently this is one person's approach to avoiding switching charges:

 

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll170/id/44439/rec/711

 

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

 

This was taken outside of Santa Fe's La Grande Station in 1934. If nothing else, it's a good photo of ATSF 126439, a Bx-12 boxcar built in 1930. The second car probably is a Bx-12 as well but the number is not visible.

 

The Santa Fe had 3,500 of these cars, purchased from AC&F (500), Pullman (1,500), General American (1,000) and Pressed Steel Car (500), according to Santa FE Boxcars, 1869-1953. The Listing Of Freight Cars By Class And Car Number 1906-1991 shows the 500 AC&F cars as having been built by the Santa Fe shops, however.

 

ATSF 126439 is a member of the 500 cars with the uncertain builder.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

53201 - 53220 of 197060