Date   

Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Douglas Harding
 

I was wondering the same thing Guy. A quick check shows Morley Mills built a modern feed mill  in Clovis NM in 1955. As a feed mill, it use local and imported grains to blend and make feed, mostly for cattle.

 

Dennis is correct that beans, as in pinto beans, are a common crop in SW Colorado and New Mexico. Also wheat, sorghum, milo and other grains.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Benjamin Hom
 

Rich Townshend wrote:
"I support the grain rush hypothesis, or something like it."

The location of the work (Clovis NM) is throwing me off.  Granted, it could be because Clovis is lighter loaded than Topeka, but you'd think the work would be done closer to the area of need.


Ben Hom


Exactrail and TrianLife (was Re: NKP 22000-22349 series boxcars)

pennsylvania1954
 

Although I have the RMJ issues Tim cited on the shelf, I thought I would try TrainLife. I found the two RMJ issues and the photos, but more importantly I found that the good guys from Exactrail have been taken over the site and made it into a store as well. Fabulous. Check it out here:

The best online model train resource & Model Train Shop.
Moderator: Second time I have made this post. First was late Saturday. Obviously found its way into Yahoo's Black Hole.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Guy Wilber
 


"Beans?"

Dennis Storzek

New Mexican Jumping Beans!  Could very well be, Dennis.  Until I saw the silos I was going to suggest cotton which was a New Mexico and Arizona product during the period of the photo.  I do know that the pinto beans from the region are said to be above average due to the higher elevations at which they are grown.



Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
.


Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <guycwilber@...> wrote

I believe, as Dennis stated, that these cars are being "coopered" and prepared for grain.  The large array of silos in the background is a pretty good indication, but I did not know that New Mexico was a major grain producing area.
=================

Beans?

Dennis Storzek
.


Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Guy Wilber
 




"Would a double sliding door car be usable for grain at all?"

Staffan Ehnbom


Dr. Ehnbom:

I have never seen photo evidence of a double door car in grain service, but the ARA's original diagrams covering the preparation of cars for grain loading included a diagram for double door cars. 

I believe, as Dennis stated, that these cars are being "coopered" and prepared for grain.  The large array of silos in the background is a pretty good indication, but I did not know that New Mexico was a major grain producing area.   

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

 

.


Re: For that special breed of modeler who enjoys tank car underframes

Douglas Harding
 

Yes, CMO is the Omaha road, http://www.cnwhs.org/ch_spmo.htm

Controlled by the CNW since 1882, leased by the CNW in 1957, ie merged, name gone 1972.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Tim O'Connor
 


To me it looks like a whole cut of cars has been pulled into a work track, and cars that need attention,
of whatever kind, are getting it. Railroad yards often had a "clean out" track where trash and filth from
the cars was shoved out onto the ground. Doing a batch of cars at the same time is the most efficient
way to do it. This looks like a similar "spot repair" activity.

Tim O'Connor




The fourth car from the right is a double door Great Northern boxcar and both doors are open.  For grain doors, wouldn’t one door be closed? the fifth car with is door close, appears to have a steam cleaner or a large shop vac next to it.  The stack of thick boards closest to the camera suggests floor board and end board replacements. 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218115/page/1


Fw: NYC boxcar

Clark Propst
 

Below is an inquiry I received. I’m hoping these cars, or something like them  ;  )) were built during the era of this list. Can anyone help Jason Klocke out on this?
 
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Clark,
 
 
I have a Red Caboose 40ft DD Automobile boxcar.   It's a NYC car, jade green with a cigar band herald.  The # is 59075.
 
I am trying to bill it but I cannot find the series in the 1965 ORER.  
 
Do you know anyone who might know about these cars?   Possibly they were renumbered from another series?    I can't believe Red Caboose would make such an error
.....the car has a repaint date of 1963 on it, yet the series does not show in the OR ER of 1965.
 
 
Maybe an NYC modeler can help?
 
 
Jason
 
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Layout Development

Eric Hansmann
 

Clark Propst outlines his new layout adventure on the Resin Car Work blog. Clark reviews his processes in choosing a new prototype location and how to model it. Check it out!

http://blog.resincarworks.com/deciding-on-a-new-layout-adventure/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Richard Townsend
 

I support the grain rush hypothesis, or something like it. A couple of years ago I ran into a Colorado & Southern book listing "cars made ready" for various high class cargos on each day at Denver. There were 10 to 20 or more cars, many from foreign roads, cleaned and patched for loading with food and other items, including (surprisingly to me) feldspar loading.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 8, 2016 6:07 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?

 
Stephan

Yes, with one door temporarily “sealed”.  My impression of the grain rush was that almost any “tight”, “clean” car was very valuable.

The presence of the GN car also supports the grain rush hypothesis, and Gary’s comments could as well.  Why else would a foreign road car be getting interior repairs?  Usually the car would be sent home for that sort of thing, right?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Aug 8, 2016, at 7:12 AM, STMFC@... wrote:



Would a double sliding door car be usable for grain at all?

Staffan Ehnbom

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 2:00 PM, 'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

The fourth car from the right is a double door Great Northern boxcar and both doors are open.  For grain doors, wouldn’t one door be closed? the fifth car with is door close, appears to have a steam cleaner or a large shop vac next to it.  The stack of thick boards closest to the camera suggests floor board and end board replacements.  
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2016 7:45 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 
 

​Bob,

You seem to have already made that "educated guess".  That's quite a string of a "dogs breakfast" of cars that all seem to be undergoing the same treatment as well.  The boards appear to be too short for interior sheathing as they would not be close to full height.
 
Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 



This is a link to a photo from the Kansas State Historical Society:

 

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218115/page/1

 

It shows workmen engaged in some activity along a string of boxcars and racks of lumber spaced out along the cars. The caption notes that this is conditioning yard at Clovis, New Mexico.

 

My initial thoughts are that the cars are being prepared for grain doors or that car interiors are being refurbished. The lack of used, broken boards on the ground probably weights against refurbishing.

 

Can anyone make an educated guess as to what actually is the activity?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA












Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :

The presence of the GN car also supports the grain rush hypothesis, and Gary’s comments could as well.  Why else would a foreign road car be getting interior repairs?  Usually the car would be sent home for that sort of thing, right?
==================

I think that's the key, "conditioning" is not repairs, it's otherwise known as "coopering", and is simply patching the holes by nailing boards over them, or driving split boards or oakum into the cracks; whatever it takes to make the car grain tight. Since they aren't removing any boards for replacement, there aren't any broken boards evident. They also appear to be cleaning the cars.

Dennis Storzek



Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Bruce Smith
 

Stephan

Yes, with one door temporarily “sealed”.  My impression of the grain rush was that almost any “tight”, “clean” car was very valuable.

The presence of the GN car also supports the grain rush hypothesis, and Gary’s comments could as well.  Why else would a foreign road car be getting interior repairs?  Usually the car would be sent home for that sort of thing, right?

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Aug 8, 2016, at 7:12 AM, STMFC@... wrote:



Would a double sliding door car be usable for grain at all?

Staffan Ehnbom

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 2:00 PM, 'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

The fourth car from the right is a double door Great Northern boxcar and both doors are open.  For grain doors, wouldn’t one door be closed? the fifth car with is door close, appears to have a steam cleaner or a large shop vac next to it.  The stack of thick boards closest to the camera suggests floor board and end board replacements.  
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2016 7:45 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 
 

​Bob,


You seem to have already made that "educated guess".  That's quite a string of a "dogs breakfast" of cars that all seem to be undergoing the same treatment as well.  The boards appear to be too short for interior sheathing as they would not be close to full height.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 



This is a link to a photo from the Kansas State Historical Society:

 



 


It shows workmen engaged in some activity along a string of boxcars and racks of lumber spaced out along the cars. The caption notes that this is conditioning yard at Clovis, New Mexico.

 


My initial thoughts are that the cars are being prepared for grain doors or that car interiors are being refurbished. The lack of used, broken boards on the ground probably weights against refurbishing.

 


Can anyone make an educated guess as to what actually is the activity?

 


Thanks.

 


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA












Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Charles Peck
 

Besides the "boards" being too short, the piece being passed into the door in the foreground seems to
have a sag.  Perhaps rolled paper for coopering the car?
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 7:45 AM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

​Bob,


You seem to have already made that "educated guess".  That's quite a string of a "dogs breakfast" of cars that all seem to be undergoing the same treatment as well.  The boards appear to be too short for interior sheathing as they would not be close to full height.


Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 


This is a link to a photo from the Kansas State Historical Society:

 

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218115/page/1

 

It shows workmen engaged in some activity along a string of boxcars and racks of lumber spaced out along the cars. The caption notes that this is conditioning yard at Clovis, New Mexico.

 

My initial thoughts are that the cars are being prepared for grain doors or that car interiors are being refurbished. The lack of used, broken boards on the ground probably weights against refurbishing.

 

Can anyone make an educated guess as to what actually is the activity?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Staffan Ehnbom
 

Would a double sliding door car be usable for grain at all?

Staffan Ehnbom

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 2:00 PM, 'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

The fourth car from the right is a double door Great Northern boxcar and both doors are open.  For grain doors, wouldn’t one door be closed? the fifth car with is door close, appears to have a steam cleaner or a large shop vac next to it.  The stack of thick boards closest to the camera suggests floor board and end board replacements. 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2016 7:45 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 
 

​Bob,


You seem to have already made that "educated guess".  That's quite a string of a "dogs breakfast" of cars that all seem to be undergoing the same treatment as well.  The boards appear to be too short for interior sheathing as they would not be close to full height.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 


This is a link to a photo from the Kansas State Historical Society:

 

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218115/page/1

 

It shows workmen engaged in some activity along a string of boxcars and racks of lumber spaced out along the cars. The caption notes that this is conditioning yard at Clovis, New Mexico.

 

My initial thoughts are that the cars are being prepared for grain doors or that car interiors are being refurbished. The lack of used, broken boards on the ground probably weights against refurbishing.

 

Can anyone make an educated guess as to what actually is the activity?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

gary laakso
 

The fourth car from the right is a double door Great Northern boxcar and both doors are open.  For grain doors, wouldn’t one door be closed? the fifth car with is door close, appears to have a steam cleaner or a large shop vac next to it.  The stack of thick boards closest to the camera suggests floor board and end board replacements. 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 

Sent: Monday, August 08, 2016 7:45 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 
 

​Bob,


You seem to have already made that "educated guess".  That's quite a string of a "dogs breakfast" of cars that all seem to be undergoing the same treatment as well.  The boards appear to be too short for interior sheathing as they would not be close to full height.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 


This is a link to a photo from the Kansas State Historical Society:

 

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218115/page/1

 

It shows workmen engaged in some activity along a string of boxcars and racks of lumber spaced out along the cars. The caption notes that this is conditioning yard at Clovis, New Mexico.

 

My initial thoughts are that the cars are being prepared for grain doors or that car interiors are being refurbished. The lack of used, broken boards on the ground probably weights against refurbishing.

 

Can anyone make an educated guess as to what actually is the activity?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: What Are These Folks Doing?

Bruce Smith
 

​Bob,


You seem to have already made that "educated guess".  That's quite a string of a "dogs breakfast" of cars that all seem to be undergoing the same treatment as well.  The boards appear to be too short for interior sheathing as they would not be close to full height.


Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What Are These Folks Doing?
 


This is a link to a photo from the Kansas State Historical Society:

 

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218115/page/1

 

It shows workmen engaged in some activity along a string of boxcars and racks of lumber spaced out along the cars. The caption notes that this is conditioning yard at Clovis, New Mexico.

 

My initial thoughts are that the cars are being prepared for grain doors or that car interiors are being refurbished. The lack of used, broken boards on the ground probably weights against refurbishing.

 

Can anyone make an educated guess as to what actually is the activity?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: For that special breed of modeler who enjoys tank car underframes

thecitrusbelt@...
 

What a great detail photo, especially when enlarged.


Did anyone notice that the Chicago & Northwestern boxcar had a CMO reporting mark? I assume that is the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: For that special breed of modeler who enjoys tank car underframes

al_brown03
 

I enjoy tank-car underframes very much ... let's see:

Judging from the sill steps and lack of end or side sills, built by General American?

Three drains: three compartments.

Bleed rod comes straight across, over the reservoir: AB valve must be buried, straight opposite the reservoir.

I'm sure others can spot more. Y'all have fun, now, hear?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Circles in Plastic Castings

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <chris_hillman@...> wrote :


Thanks Schuyler, ---- So THAT'S what they're from. Strange thing is many other hoppers & other cars show no signs of these markings, at least not in clearly visible areas. Either the other cars were ejected differently, or the Proto 2000 (and others) were ejected too soon when the plastic was still too soft ???
 
Paul Hillman
================

Where the ejector pin prints end up is dictated by how the mold designer orients the part in the mold. There have been many molds built over the years, and each designer has to weigh all his options, then make what he feels are the best choices.

Aside from where the ejector pins will go, the other consideration is where the plastic will be injected into the part, the "sprue" and "gate". Unless this is a really complicated mold, the "E pins" will always be on the side opposite the gate.

If you want the pin prints to be on the underside of the slope sheets, that means the gate needs to be in the center of the interior of the part, which either puts it on the cross ridge, or the centersill over the center hopper on a triple. In addition, it puts the gate deep into the part, which means a long sprue. Since sprues need to be tapered, the longer it is, the bigger the scar it leaves on the part. Heated sprue bushings can allow a "pin point" gate, but accommodating the heated bushing in the narrow confines of the core that makes the car interior becomes problematic.

The other way to design things is to orient the part so the gate is on the underside, between the hoppers. This puts the e-pins on the slope sheets, but since the slope sheets are the traditional location for car weights, they  can be covered by separate slope sheet parts.

Indented pin prints are not from ejecting the part too hot, but is rather intentional to make little seats so the part stays on the pin ends and comes out of the mold straight, without dragging a detailed surface on part of the mold. It also helps insure that the pin prints don't stand above the surrounding surface and form shallow bumps that get in the way of other parts. Ejector pins in the typical mold for an HO scale body are somewhere about 6" or 7" long, and change length relative to the rest of the mold as the mold temperature changes, so a perfect match is seldom possible.

Dennis Storzek


50721 - 50740 of 194744