Date   

TRAX 12000-12599

Brian Carlson
 

Can anyone tell me what trucks can on the TRAX 12000-12599 reefers built in 1954? There are 5 photos in Gene Green’s Refrigerator Car Color Guide but the exposures are such that everything below the side sill is too dark to tell.

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 


Question from the archives

Dave Nelson
 

Tonight I was looking for information about Shell Oil tankcars (RPX, SCCX, and SCMX) wondering when some of them were painted yellow.  I found Richard H. answered this question waaaay back in 2002 (it being back in the 20’s, too early for my interests).  A follow up from Jon Miller prompts this post: Jon gently kidded Richard that it was about time he write that tank car book he had been considering for so long.

 

My question tonight is did Richard actually start, finish, or see published that book?

 

And speaking of Richard (may he rest in peace), anyone know what the state of affairs are at the CSRM WRT his bequeathed collection?

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Modeling a ATSF BX-77

Allan Smith
 

Try a Branchline  1000 series 50' postwar riveted side boxcar. It has  a diagonal panel roof 4-4 roller pin ends and close to the correct side. You may have to add details for Bx-77 1001.I think Microscale has decals for the Shock Control cars.See page 26 of Santa Fe Box Cars The Shock Control Era 1954-1995.

Al Smith
Sonora Ca


On Saturday, December 31, 2016 8:15 PM, "thekays100@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I have been planning to build a ATSF BX-77 boxcar with the large "DF...With..Shock Control" markings for a while now and have gathered together what I thought were the necessary items.   As I started the project today I realized that the car I had planned to use, a Branchline Single Door boxcar, was really not correct as the side panels are not all the same width.   

Is there a kit that can be used for this prototype, without rebuilding the sides?   I know I will have to add the gussets on either side of the door, but I really don't want to sand the sides smooth and redo the panels.   

Any suggestions?

Steve Kay




Diosol Formula

qmp211
 

Greetings,

I copied the Diosol formula posted in one of the yahoo groups several years ago by a chemist who lab analyzed and posted the formula. This is as posted verbatim.

"38% by vol toluene, 41% by vol xylene and 21% by vol Solvesso 100 (a long evaporation rate aromatic hydrocarbon solvent). Getting the toluene and xylene is not difficult, but the Solvesso 100 is only available through chemical suppliers."

I was fortunate to have a local paint manufacturer that could provide the Solvesso 100.

Also, I would never soak anything other than metal in Diosol.

BTW, I'm looking for original formula Floquil RR10 Engine Black, the exact number must be RR10. Bottle, box, can, case......

Thanks.

Randy Danniel


Re: Not stripping, but painting (Scalecoat II)

Schuyler Larrabee
 

As to tape . . . I have used just about everything except 3M Packing tape . . . drafting tape, Magic tape, the blue painter’s tape . . . but I have had the best experience with 3M 218 Fine Line Tape. I have two rolls 1/16” and ½”. Simple sloth has “prevented” me from buying a couple other widths, but so far I’ve been able to get by with these two. Obviously, I can cut down the ½” where necessary. It has a very smooth, non-fuzzy edge and adheres well. I have place and re-place and re-place and replaced the tape to get it in >exactly< the right location many times, without it losing its stickiness. I press it down with a round wood toothpick using the pointed end, and also the other end sliced at a very flat angle to get a wider flat surface. Never (yet) had it lift paint (touch wood). It also (the narrow tape) can be convinced to bend around curved lines if not too tight a radius. I’ve also slit or kerfed it along one edge to get it to bend a little tighter.



I also use Microscale’s MicroMask when it gets just too complicated to deal with, using the tape as the edges of complicated things, like ladders.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 02, 2017 7:49 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Not stripping, but painting (Scalecoat II)





Having just used Scale Coat II, be aware that it takes a lot longer to dry and fully cure than Floquil does.

Scale Coat also dries to a gloss finish - fine for decaling. A top coat of Testors Dull Coat or something similar that is alcohol based will reduce the shine and not harm the paint



For masking, I've used Tamaya (? Never could spell that name correctly when away from the workbench) which has a thin, reasonably low tack fine-edged masking tape which worked very well over Scale Coat II after it had cured for two or three days.



I've found that the commercial blue and green masking tape has a higher tackiness which can lift relatively fresh paint. One way I found to use it when needed, is to run a strip of it on a piece of glass rubbing it down well.. Then cut what is needed. Pulling it off the glass reduces some of the tacky-ness.



Ed Bommer









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

genegreen1942@...
 


That modular organizing system looks quite handy and the prices seem pretty good, too.  Apparently "some assembly required."  Does anyone know of what material the various parts are made?  I couldn't seem to find that information on the website.  I especially liked the paint bottle storage.
Gene Green
 


Re: Not stripping, but painting (Scalecoat II)

Edward
 

Having just used Scale Coat II, be aware that it takes a lot longer to dry and fully cure than Floquil does.
Scale Coat also dries to a gloss finish - fine for decaling. A top coat of Testors Dull Coat or something similar that is alcohol based will reduce the shine and not harm the paint

For masking, I've used Tamaya (? Never could spell that name correctly when away from the workbench) which has a thin, reasonably low tack fine-edged masking tape which worked very well over Scale Coat II after it had cured for two or three days. 

I've found that the commercial blue and green masking tape has a higher tackiness which can lift relatively fresh paint.  One way I found to use it when needed, is to run a strip of it on a piece of glass rubbing it down well.. Then cut what is needed. Pulling it off the glass reduces some of the tacky-ness.

Ed Bommer 

 


Re: "Freight Train (1954)"

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

It worked, at least for me. Thanks for posting this... unlike most other non-railroad produced films, this one was actually pretty well done.
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Monday, January 2, 2017 2:11 PM, "abrown@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Lots of STMFCs in this one. I especially like the two rebuilt tank cars in the opening sequence. Not sure if the link will work: it's on YouTube.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.






Re: workshop products

Bill Welch
 

Tim, I know it is very popular w/military modelers. I just checked some of my YouTube subscriptions and nothing popped right up. I suggest searching YuoTube as I am finding some very fine things about painting. You of course downloaded my Acrylic Painting resources folder from Dropbox?

Airbrushing 101. . . Handouts

Note especially Airbrush Medium for reducing water based acrylics.


Bill Welch




Re: Modeling a ATSF BX-77

charles slater
 

Steve, I can tell you there is an HO model of the Bx-76 class cars (same as the Bx-77) in the works from a small model company back east, and they are using an Atlas model that is very close to the two classes of cars except for the lower side sill and a couple of other small things. I think, not sure, they are using the 50 foot single door "Master Line" car. That would be a very good starting point for the one Bx-77 class car built at Topeka in 1958.

Charlie Slater

Bakersfield, Ca.


Sent from Outlook




From: STMFC@... on behalf of thekays100@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, December 31, 2016 8:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Modeling a ATSF BX-77
 
 

I have been planning to build a ATSF BX-77 boxcar with the large "DF...With..Shock Control" markings for a while now and have gathered together what I thought were the necessary items.   As I started the project today I realized that the car I had planned to use, a Branchline Single Door boxcar, was really not correct as the side panels are not all the same width.   


Is there a kit that can be used for this prototype, without rebuilding the sides?   I know I will have to add the gussets on either side of the door, but I really don't want to sand the sides smooth and redo the panels.   


Any suggestions?


Steve Kay



Re: West Side Belt hoppers

Eric Hansmann
 

Thank you for the NYCL details, David.

 

I just found images in my collection of Erie 50-ton hoppers #22199 and 22513 with this type of hopper doors. It seems these discharge between the rails and not to the side.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 02, 2017 8:51 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] West Side Belt hoppers

 



PMcK&Y 61000-61999, NYC Lot 340-H, or PMcK&Y 62000-62999, NYC Lot 349-H, both built by SSC in 1916.

http://canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-340.jpg
http://canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-349.jpg

 

Some of these were rebuilt as sawtooth hoppers with panel sides in 1937, P&LE 38500-39499, Lot 665-H.

http://canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-665.jpg

 



David Thompson


Not stripping, but painting (Scalecoat II)

mopacfirst
 

I've learned a lot about stripping in the last few days.  Now I want to ask about painting.


For various reasons, I have not had a completed resin car to paint since I ran out of Floquil.  Now I have several that are almost ready to paint.  I'm also between airbrushes, so I've been doing painting of trucks and couplers, and other odd pieces, with rattle cans of Testors (pretty much black only), and with Scalecoat II.  I'm satisfied with the behavior of the Scalecoat, so I'm about ready to paint a few resin cars (so far, just Sunshine).


I've always washed the Sunshine parts with warm soapy water, and sanded all the surfaces to be cemented with ACC or sometimes given them a good knife scraping so I have good clean surfaces for the cementing.  Nothing has come apart.  I've painted twenty or thirty cars with Floquil, and have not had any problems with adhesion except for one spot on a running board, and that could have been mechanical damage.  I'm not equipped to do any blasting.


So I'm about to do some painting of complete cars with Scalecoat II in cans.  I'm perfectly capable of wiping doen the surfaces with 91% alcohol, and I think I did that with some cars that I airbrushed with Floquil.  Are there any other things I should do to minimize the risk of paint debonding?


I have a few gons to paint first, and I have sometimes given the interior a coating of rail brown or similar, with an exterior paint color on the exterior and the top bulb angles.  Should I expect any issues with masking tape? 


Any other advice?


Ron Merrick 


"Freight Train (1954)"

al_brown03
 

Lots of STMFCs in this one. I especially like the two rebuilt tank cars in the opening sequence. Not sure if the link will work: it's on YouTube.


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.



Freight Train (1954)



Re: dreaded Duco cement

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

I use Duco regularly to dress the ends of the fletches on my arrows so they don't rise up and tear off the shaft. I'm using it more for model building these days as well. Holds very well. I order mine from American Science and Surplus (on line or from their paper catalog) in a two for the price of one deal.

Yours Aye,


Garth


On 1/2/17 2:40 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

I am actually getting to like this stuff - a little has a lot of adhesion.


A big glob dries to a thin layer. it's fast drying (mixed blessing).


I usually put a glob down on a piece of wax paper (it doesn't level), pass the part to be glued in it and wipe off the excess.


Dried Duco seems to be more flexible than old Ambroid.


I am still building Quality Craft cabooses and I came across an interesting technique for building roof walks. I drag a Tichy wire through the Duco and place it between 2 roof walk boards. Getting it out is a chore but if the entire assembly is held in place by under braces and is long enough, I just cut the portion with wire spacers away.


The grab irons look nice too using Yarmouth eye bolts. I make the side grab irons out of the soft wire in the kit, bending it around coins.


ed mines



dreaded Duco cement

ed_mines
 

I am actually getting to like this stuff - a little has a lot of adhesion.


A big glob dries to a thin layer. it's fast drying (mixed blessing).


I usually put a glob down on a piece of wax paper (it doesn't level), pass the part to be glued in it and wipe off the excess.


Dried Duco seems to be more flexible than old Ambroid.


I am still building Quality Craft cabooses and I came across an interesting technique for building roof walks. I drag a Tichy wire through the Duco and place it between 2 roof walk boards. Getting it out is a chore but if the entire assembly is held in place by under braces and is long enough, I just cut the portion with wire spacers away.


The grab irons look nice too using Yarmouth eye bolts. I make the side grab irons out of the soft wire in the kit, bending it around coins.


ed mines


Re: Stripping resin castings

Tim O'Connor
 


That is very curious. Tells me the doors and body were probably not
the same material.

Obviously not all polystyrene and urethane resin formulas are the same.

Brake fluid will attack anything contain rubber compounds like ABS.

Google for "resistance to brake fluid" plus "urethane resin" or other
things like "styrene" or "epoxy" etc etc.

I have stripped some Front Range models by soaking them in a bottle of Accupaint
thinner - which contains both ACETONE and MEK - you'd think they would MELT but
they were undamaged! And of course the paint came off, since Front Range used that
type of paint.

When I paint with acrylics I keep a bucket of lukewarm water nearby. A couple
of times when I made a major mistake, I just dunked the model immediately
into the bucket! After it dried out, I started over.

Tim O'Connor

==================================

I used Chameleon on a SMMW car.  The doors and running boards balled up into wads of uselessness; the main body casting was unfazed.  Curious indeed.

But short answer - use brake fluid, Scalecoat Rinse Away, Chameleon at your own peril.

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: workshop products

Tim O'Connor
 


Interesting... I've built stair-style paint bottle shelves for myself,
with craft wood. Probably cost almost as much as these. I like the corner
shelves especially.

Has anyone tried this "UMP" brand thinner for their acrylics? I have bottles
from a number of brands so I'm curious if this stuff will work with everything
as it claims to.
http://www.hobbyworld-usa.com/Store/painting-tools/531-ump-thinner.html

Tim




Just a thought, here is a modular organizing system. A headache for me is paint.
Modular Workshop System - Hobbyworld-USA


Re: Stripping resin castings

Bill Welch
 

Stated more bluntly NEVER use them.

Bill Welch


Re: West Side Belt hoppers

David
 

PMcK&Y 61000-61999, NYC Lot 340-H, or PMcK&Y 62000-62999, NYC Lot 349-H, both built by SSC in 1916.

http://canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-340.jpg
http://canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-349.jpg

 

Some of these were rebuilt as sawtooth hoppers with panel sides in 1937, P&LE 38500-39499, Lot 665-H.

http://canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-665.jpg

 



David Thompson


Re: Turtle Roof?

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,


To add to Steve's comments.  The X31 series (X31, X31A, X31B, X31C), when built, pushed the limits of the eastern clearance diagrams.  For that reason, the grab irons on the roof were inset into pockets in the roof to make the clearances.  Fast forward to the early days of WWII, when, as Steve says, bumping the roof on the X31 allowed it to hold more vehicles (jeeps in particular) creating the X31F.  In the intervening years, the clearances had gotten bigger, although I am not sure that all of the east coast clearances could accommodate the X31F.  That would not have been necessary though, as the cars, at least as built, were designed for specific cargos on specific routes. 


Now, about the interesting "step" in the roof.  It gets even more interesting that you may know, because the cars were equipped with Evans automobile loaders, which had visible external hardware on the ends of the cars.  Typically, that hardware is at nearly the highest point, as it is a pivot point for the loader to swing up into storage.  IF you were building the X31F to optimize space, both with loaders in use and stored, then the stepped roof would be a big no-no, since the stored loader would be well under the high roof sections.​  The location would NOT affect the loaders when loaded.  Now comes my speculation.  Why did they build the stepped roof?  Expedience and frugality.  The PRR could keep the ends of the cars and all the safety appliances exactly the same by only raising the center of the roof.  This would have reduced the time, materials (remember, steel is scarce in war!) and expense of the modification. The car retained the same capacity as an X31 with the loaders stored (as confirmed by a quick check of the ORER), but had lots of extra capacity with the loaders in use and these cars were in dedicated service, so not much use was planned without the loaders.  If the car was built new, it would have made more sense to build the roof all at the same height, hence the reason the "design" was not "adopted".  Note that the X31Fs lost their loaders after WWII when even bigger cars eclipsed their capacity.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of jimbetz@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 1, 2017 11:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Turtle Roof?
 


Hi,


  What was the design point of the stepped ends on the PRR turtle roof box cars?

As in the 'purpose' of them ...and why wasn't that feature 'successful' (not 

picked up or repeated)?

                                                                                       - Jim



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