Date   

Re: Kadee.148 couplers

Jim Betz
 

Armand and all,

I have found the #148s to be very good. My biggest 'complaint'
is that they are a little bit more prone to drooping. That is easily
fixed by adding a small shim to the underside of the opening
of the coupler box. I'm not certain of what size I use for the
shim ... it is approximately 1/16th" wide and probably .010"
thick ... more or less the size of a scale 2x6?

===> I certainly wish I had a supply of dark colored styrene
to do that shim - painting the white is ... well, a pain(t).
Black, charcoal, even a light grey would be better than
the white - because sooner or later the paint wears off
and has to be renewed.

I love how well they center compared to Kadees with the
copper springs for centering.

****

I have a love hate relationship with the semi-scale heads
on the #158s. I love how they look. I hate how they are
so much harder to couple/uncouple (usually with a pick),
how -poorly- they inter operate with #5 size couplers, and
how they tend to uncouple when running on less than
stellar track due to vertical motion of two adjacent cars
(the shim mentioned above helps that but doesn't fix it
forever because of the reduced "gather".
- Jim B.


Wanted - your model photos!

Eric Hansmann
 

As Prototype Rails kicks off in Cocoa Beach, many participants will be displaying their latest models at the RPM. We all can't attend but we can share an image of our latest work on the Resin Car Works blog as a virtual RPM display.

Send me one image of your latest completed or in-process project. Please include a short description of the model and prototype inspiration, and your full name. I can format the images and text into an upcoming blog post featuring the contributed works.

If you have a cell phone with a decent camera, your image should work fine for a web presentation. Check you camera function settings to be certain you are taking a large size image. Additional photo tips are included below.

Please send your photo and info to me at this email address:

 

eric (at) hansmanns (dot) org

 

Replace the (at) and (dot) with the appropriate symbols and drop any spaces. Do not hit reply to this message as it will go to the YahooGroup and not all Groups accept attachments. 

I look forward to seeing your work!

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy

 

 

You can take quality images with a cell phone by following a handful of points.

 

First, light up your subject. Don't depend upon one room light for the photo. Use a couple of shop lamps set up to illuminate the subject.

Second, take more than one image. Digital photos are pretty cheap so take many from a few angles. Pick the best of the bunch to send along.

Third, don't get too close to the subject. You don't need to fill the frame with the subject. Some cell phone cameras will distort and give a fish-eye look if your cell phone is too close to the subject. It is more difficult for cell phone cameras to focus on close subjects and the depth of field is minimized. Your image will probably be cropped for the final presentation.

Fourth, many cell phone cameras have a focus and aperture function that a user can control. Once the subject is framed, tap the screen with your finger on the point where you want the focus.

Fifth, keep taking photos! Your cell phone camera becomes easier to use as you take more images. You will take better images in the long run and gain a better understanding of how your cell phone camera works.

Your cell phone camera can be a great modeling tool.


Re: Kadee.148 couplers

SamClarke
 

Hello group,  are you talking about the smaller scale head #158 whisker coupler rather than the standard head (#5 size) #148 coupler?  The scale head couplers have a smaller pulling face (gathering area) and thus do not handle rough track and sharp grade transitions as well as the larger standard head couplers.

Sam Clarke
Kadee Quality Products


Toronto Railway Prototype Modellers Meet

Richard MCQUADE
 


The annual Toronto Railway Prototype Modellers Meet will be held on Saturday, March 18th from 8:30 am to 4:00pm. The day consists of clinics by prototype modellers and the unique “show and tell” component, an open forum for modellers to discuss the display models. Each attendee is urged to bring a model, whether completed or not, for this, although this is not mandatory. The Meet’s location is the same as last year: Humber College, 205 Humber College Blvd, Toronto, ON M9W 5L7 - North Campus, Building B, rooms B201& B202. The admission is $15 and parking is free. For further information check our website at:   Toronto Railway Prototype Modellers  or contact Brian Gauer at: bdgauer@... 



Re: Kadee.148 couplers

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 1/4/2017 6:55 AM, Armand Premo arm.p.prem@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
I have mounted several pair of Kadee 148 couplers and like the close coupling.I have yet to try them on a layout.Has anyone had any experience with them?.If so.please tell me what you think of their appearance and operation.Armand Premo


Armand,

I like their appearance. However, they are a little more prone to uncoupling on vertical curves. While not banned at the Colorado Model Railroad Museum, they are discouraged.

Spen Kellogg


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote :

Mark;

My first thought was that they were lathe boards for application of plaster to walls in homes of that era. Just a guess, but I saw a lot that looked like that back when I worked on houses.

Elden Gatwood
==============

Too wide, too thick. Lath was usually bundled.

Dennis Storzek


Kadee.148 couplers

Armand Premo
 

I have mounted several pair of Kadee 148 couplers and like the close coupling.I have yet to try them on a layout.Has anyone had any experience with them?.If so.please tell me what you think of their appearance and operation.Armand Premo


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Mark;

My first thought was that they were lathe boards for application of plaster to walls in homes of that era. Just a guess, but I saw a lot that looked like that back when I worked on houses.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:14 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site



Thanks for sharing. There sure is a lot of lumber around that single XL.

Interesting scene the boards look to be about 4-5 long any ideas on their use?


Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On Jan 3, 2017, at 3:51 PM, rwitt_2000@... <mailto:rwitt_2000@...> [STMFC] <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:





A PRR 27501 class XL

Bob Witt

Blockedhttp://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-01-03-17/X1203.jpg


Cardboard Shipping Containers

thecitrusbelt@...
 

The Santa Fe Railway film "Payday" (c. 1955) shows a number of cardboard shipping containers starting at 15:25. Here is the link:  

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlzTqPfHrAI

 

Notice that televisions are enclosed in cardboard.

 

In the Southern California citrus industry wooden packing crates started to be phased-out of packing houses in the early 1950s.  By 1954, this transition was almost complete in Sunkist affiliated packing houses. In that year, 90 percent of the lemons and nearly as large a percent of oranges and grapefruits were shipped in cartons.  Beginning in the 1955-56 fiscal year, all Sunkist orders, quotations, accounting and other records switched from a “box” to a “carton” basis. Sunkist shipped around seventy percent of all Southern California citrus in those times.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Question from the archives

Dave Nelson
 

Ahh. what a shame he didn't get to it.



WRT my question about CSRM, thanks for the info. I'll try and make time to
look next time I'm in Sacxramento.



Dave Nelson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 02, 2017 10:30 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Question from the archives








Dave Nelson wrote:







A follow up from Jon Miller prompts this post: Jon gently kidded Richard
that it was about time he write that tank car book he had been considering
for so long. My question tonight is did Richard actually start, finish, or
see published that book?



I urged Richard many times to just make a start on that book, and of
course I stood ready to publish it. Unfortunately, he never really found the
energy to take on what would have been a big task. His pride in "doing it
right" would have required mammoth research. I retrieved from his computer a
file called "Tank Car Book," but it only contained some miscellaneous photos
and brief texts, probably just a pigeonhole for "stuff" that came along. He
could have written a wonderful book even with just what he could recall from
his own memory, but it just didn't happen



And speaking of Richard (may he rest in peace), anyone know what the state
of affairs are at the CSRM WRT his bequeathed collection?



The collection has been gone over carefully, removed from Richard's
photo album "magnetic" sticky pages, and placed in archival folders, and his
organization scheme, by car types and then alphabetically by owner, has been
preserved. As far as I know it is accessible, though I have not personally
used it since it has been at CSRM. (Over the years I did scan a lot of his
stuff I was personally interested in, so have a file of my own). If anyone
does use, or attempt to use, the collection at CSRM, please keep this list
posted on results.



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Ray Breyer
 

>>I wish I could find a treasure trove of similar glass plate negatives for the CB&Q!!!
>>Charlie Vlk


Keep looking through these shots, Charlie. I've found 22 CB&Q cars in them so far, including boxcars, reefers, and even a stock car (CB&Q 53035, loaded with hogs in Hoboken in December 1921).

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Ray Breyer
 

Don't forget about strawboard, which is a little earlier than cardboard and was easier to make. In the Midwest, "strawboard tracks" pop up all over the place on railroad track charts and on Sanborn maps for local, small box makers.
 
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



From: "Dave Parker spottab@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 8:14 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site



Tony:

We don't disagree.  I probably erred on the side of caution in my wording.  FWIW, this is what Wiki has to say:

"The first corrugated cardboard box manufactured in the USA was in 1895.[16] By the early 1900s, wooden crates and boxes were being replaced by corrugated paper shipping cartons."

Absent data, I too would guess that wooden containers dominated the market through the twenties at a minimum.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA








Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Tony & Group,

Appliances were still be shipped in wood crates in the early 1950s. The apartment house that we lived down the street from did a major refitting of appliances that arrived in wooden crates. These crates were set out as trash in the alley from where my Dad salvaged several and constructed a playhouse for me in our back yard. 

Cheers, 
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Jan 3, 2017, at 5:45 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Dave Parker wrote:

 
I would have guessed wooden boxes/crates.  Although corrugated boxes were certainly in use by 1919, I don't think they had completely supplanted wood in the shipping business.

       I think cardboard took over MUCH later than 1919. Certainly in produce shipping, not until the 1950s. Appliances were still shipped in wooden crates prior to World War II, not sure about afterwards.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history








Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site - about the collections

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thank you, Ken, I appreciate knowing that people notice.



The stuff in the PRR boxcar shot are “shooks.” Shooks were discussed on this list some time ago, and I’m frankly surprised that it was the first word that came to my mind.



https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shook



Now, about the images. For a very long time, Pat McKnight has been posting exclusively (AFAIK) DL&W images from the DL&W collection of corporate images to the erielack list. He’s looking for help with ID of locations and what the images are showing, and the erielack list provides him with the best likelihood that someone will be able to identify them.



Not wanting to disseminate incorrect information, and with the DL&W photos that’s all too easy, I will say that there were a couple of DL&W corporate photographers. WB Bunnell, was one, and his images have his initials on them: WBB. There was a second photographer who had a similar name, and I can’t recall the way there is to tell the two apart.



But the ERIE images, while they did come to Steamtown from Syracuse University’s archives, are a separate collection by another photographer. I believe that Pat has only recently begun posting ERIE images – or at least I only recently noticed it. I am kind of random about which images I open. I look at the thumbnails and see if there’s something with Freight Car interest, or now, ERIE relevance (ERIE is more my “thing” than DL&W, though both are fascinating roads with different styles. ERIE was a bit of a hard luck working class road, while DL&W was more of a first class money making railroad, hence the money to build the cutoffs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, including several enormous concrete viaducts, and even to contemplate building their own tunnel under the Hudson to a terminal on Manhattan!) Many of the ERIE images appear to be second or third shots of stations; the first shots (the best shots, maybe) were published in a series of books (soft cover, 8½ x 11, horizontal format) published by The Railroadians, a now-defunct railfan organization in New Jersey. The series was called “The Next Station will be . . .” and covered essentially every station on the ERIE, its branches and associated railroads.



I hope this is of interest.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:43 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site





Most of these photos are from DL&W glass plates formerly stored at Syracuse University. The University donated them to Steamtown. Pat McKnight, the curator, posts a number each day to verify the info they have for the slides. Lately, Pat has posted some Erie main line station photos, but for the most part, these photos we see are shots from the 1920s, shot by Lackawanna company photographers. Trying to pinpoint locations one hundred years or so after the fact gets sporty. SGL does good work, rooting out the many freight cars photos that show up in these old glass plate negatives. So please enjoy the photos.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Dave Parker
 

Tony:

We don't disagree.  I probably erred on the side of caution in my wording.  FWIW, this is what Wiki has to say:

"The first corrugated cardboard box manufactured in the USA was in 1895.[16] By the early 1900s, wooden crates and boxes were being replaced by corrugated paper shipping cartons."

Absent data, I too would guess that wooden containers dominated the market through the twenties at a minimum.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA




Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Jeffrey White
 

This film, The Freight Goes Through dates from the 1950s and shows appliances in crates:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT8WIXDxbyE

Jeff White

Alma, IL


On 1/3/2017 7:45 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] wrote:
�
Dave Parker wrote:

�
I would have guessed wooden boxes/crates.� Although corrugated boxes were certainly in use by 1919, I don't think they had completely supplanted wood in the shipping business.

� � � �I think cardboard took over MUCH later than 1919. Certainly in produce shipping, not until the 1950s. Appliances were still shipped in wooden crates prior to World War II, not sure about afterwards.

Tony Thompson�� � � � � ��Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705�� � � ��www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history







Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Tim O'Connor
 

Possibly, but before corrugated paper boxes, thin wood boxes and baskets
were used for just about everything. Barrels are usually more substantial.

I find the lading of interest here.� I don't see how to determine if this is the loading point
or the unloading point.� A lot of wood cut to a rather specific size but being allowed to�
weather.� I'm thinking these could be an early step towards barrel staves. Other thoughts?
Chuck Peck in FL


Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Parker wrote:

 
I would have guessed wooden boxes/crates.  Although corrugated boxes were certainly in use by 1919, I don't think they had completely supplanted wood in the shipping business.

       I think cardboard took over MUCH later than 1919. Certainly in produce shipping, not until the 1950s. Appliances were still shipped in wooden crates prior to World War II, not sure about afterwards.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Dave Parker
 

I would have guessed wooden boxes/crates.  Although corrugated boxes were certainly in use by 1919, I don't think they had completely supplanted wood in the shipping business.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Tuesday, January 3, 2017 3:13 PM, "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Barrel staves were the first thing that came to my mind.
 
Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX
 
 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:12 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site
 



I find the lading of interest here.  I don't see how to determine if this is the loading point
or the unloading point.  A lot of wood cut to a rather specific size but being allowed to 
weather.  I'm thinking these could be an early step towards barrel staves. Other thoughts?
Chuck Peck in FL
 
On Tue, Jan 3, 2017 at 3:51 PM, rwitt_2000@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 




Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Charlie Vlk
 

Eric-

Thanks. I wish I could find a treasure trove of similar glass plate
negatives for the CB&Q!!!

Charlie Vlk



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:14 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site





Charlie,



I have not fond a way to search their site. Here's the page where I usually
start trolling around.



http://lists.railfan.net/mplist.cgi?erielack-photo




Maybe some ELRHS members can offer more assistance.



Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX







_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 3:08 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site









How does one get to the Erie historical photos to search for a particular
location?

I want to see if there are any Erie photos in Chicago vicinity of the St.
Charles Air Line.

Thanks,

Charlie Vlk

47941 - 47960 of 194731