Date   

Re: Clear Resin Castings

Paul Hillman
 

Hello Jack, 

I've tried that before & still have some, but the windows have come out "wavy" & not flat & perfectly clear like "acetate" does/is. Unless I didn't do it properly enough. Guess I might not have  "mastered that step" yet.

Paul Hillman




From: STMFC@... on behalf of Jack Burgess jack@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 8:59 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings
 
 

Paul...

Micro scale has a product called Kristal Klerk which call be used to create clear windows and it dries clear in an hour or so. The first time that you try it, it can be frustrating but practice first. Basically, you dip a toothpick it the jar, transfer the material to all inside edges of the window, and then get some more on the toothpick and "pull" the material across the window to completely fill it. Once you successfully master that step, it works like a charm.

Jack Burgess 





On Sun, Jan 8, 2017 at 8:28 PM -0500, "chris_hillman@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?


Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Jack Burgess
 

Paul...

Micro scale has a product called Kristal Klerk which call be used to create clear windows and it dries clear in an hour or so. The first time that you try it, it can be frustrating but practice first. Basically, you dip a toothpick it the jar, transfer the material to all inside edges of the window, and then get some more on the toothpick and "pull" the material across the window to completely fill it. Once you successfully master that step, it works like a charm.

Jack Burgess 





On Sun, Jan 8, 2017 at 8:28 PM -0500, "chris_hillman@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?


Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Thomas Birkett
 

I think they owned the Colorado Midland for awhile

Tom Birkett, Bartlesville, ok



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, January 08, 2017 7:55 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings





Chuck, I thought of doing something like that but I'd rather have full
windows.

I think the Santa Fe was actually considered a "short-line" the first day
their construction started, but it didn't end up that way after time. Don't
actually know if it ever had any narrow-gauge. Interesting question.

Paul Hillman



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of Charles
Hladik RUTLANDRS@aol.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 7:36 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings





Paul,

Without actually seeing the piece, I suggest that you paint "the post"
the caboose color and trim it to look as though it's open.

By the way, is this Santa Fe some sort of short line or a narrow gauge?

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division







-----Original Message-----
From: chris_hillman@msn.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sun, Jan 8, 2017 8:28 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings



I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and
find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part
of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical
"post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using
the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending
areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back,
but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time
is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster
than 72 hours?



Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Paul Hillman
 

Chuck, I thought of doing something like that but I'd rather have full windows.

I think the Santa Fe was actually considered a "short-line" the first day their construction started, but it didn't end up that way after time. Don't actually know if it ever had any narrow-gauge. Interesting question.

Paul Hillman




From: STMFC@... on behalf of Charles Hladik RUTLANDRS@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 7:36 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings
 
 

Paul,

    Without actually seeing the piece, I suggest that you paint "the post" the caboose color and trim it to look as though it's open.

    By the way, is this Santa Fe some sort of short line or a narrow gauge?

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division




-----Original Message-----
From: chris_hillman@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Jan 8, 2017 8:28 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings

 
I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.
I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.
I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).
Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Charles Hladik
 

Paul,

    Without actually seeing the piece, I suggest that you paint "the post" the caboose color and trim it to look as though it's open.

    By the way, is this Santa Fe some sort of short line or a narrow gauge?

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



-----Original Message-----
From: chris_hillman@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Jan 8, 2017 8:28 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings

 
I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.
I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.
I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).
Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Clear Resin Castings

Paul Hillman
 

I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?


Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Bruce Smith
 

Steve, Folks,


Having been able to pull out the photo and look, I can say that even without the photo, Steve nailed it ;)  And I must say that I fee MUCH more confident in my UTL minutia due to an absolutely awesome clinic that Steve gave on this very subject at Cocoa.  I can't wait to dig out my UTLX cars and get to work!


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, Al (Just got back 2 hours ago!)



From: STMFC@... on behalf of shile@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 2:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo
 


Without having the picture in front of me, I believe that Dave in correct.  When the X-3's were converted to AB brakes, the air reservoir and AB valve are supported by a pair of heavy stampings that are riveted to the center sill and also help support the running board.  There is a good photo showing this installation in the prototype data document on the RCW webpage at

http://resincarworks.com/extras/kit4-01_UTLX10kX-3_protodata.pdf

Let me know if there is something else needed in this area.

Please note that Frank left out the small triangular gusset on the outside of each tank saddle casting and didn't mention how to address this issue in the instructions. I cut small right triangles from a piece of Evergreen HO 1x4 styrene and glued it, on edge, against the tank saddle casting.

Hope this helps.  From sunny but cool Florida in the wake of a fine Prototype Rails meet.

Steve Hile


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Steve SANDIFER
 

These should help from UTLX 54679, an X-3 preserved in El Dorado, Kansas.
What you see in Ted's book are these stampings which support the break
cylinder and triple valve as well as the running board.





__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 1:20 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo






I don't have that book, but didn't all UTLX tank cars have square plates
mounted
on the running boards (4 plates, facing all 4 directions) for mounting
hazard placards?

Tim O'Connor




Working on a UTLX X-3 Resin Car Works tank car. I have been using Steam Era
Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 2, Tank Cars by SpeedMedia for
additional photo help. My question is regarding the photo of UTLX 37455 on
the bottom of page 77. Next to the air reservoir on the left side is a
plate (guard, mud flap) that appears to be attached to the running board to
protect the air reservoir and control valve from wheel spray or maybe a
train line bracket which appears to be running through it. Wondering what
the real purpose is.

Thank you, in advance, for your time and effort to look and help.

Lester Breuer


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Without having the picture in front of me, I believe that Dave in correct.  When the X-3's were converted to AB brakes, the air reservoir and AB valve are supported by a pair of heavy stampings that are riveted to the center sill and also help support the running board.  There is a good photo showing this installation in the prototype data document on the RCW webpage at

http://resincarworks.com/extras/kit4-01_UTLX10kX-3_protodata.pdf

Let me know if there is something else needed in this area.

Please note that Frank left out the small triangular gusset on the outside of each tank saddle casting and didn't mention how to address this issue in the instructions. I cut small right triangles from a piece of Evergreen HO 1x4 styrene and glued it, on edge, against the tank saddle casting.

Hope this helps.  From sunny but cool Florida in the wake of a fine Prototype Rails meet.

Steve Hile


-----Original Message-----
From: "Dave Parker spottab@... [STMFC]"
Sent: Jan 8, 2017 1:37 PM
To: "STMFC@..."
Subject: [STMFC] Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

 

Lester:

I would defer to Ted or to Steve Hile, but my take (guess) is that there is a pair of those "flaps", one on either side of the reservoir, and that their purpose is to support the reservoir and (likely) the AB valve above.  I also think they must be attached to the centersill.  It looks like some sort of bracket assembly that was applied when the car was converted from KC to AB.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Scott H. Haycock
 

Lester,

In the Tank Car Color Guide, Vol. 1, on page 9 is a photo of a Warrengas car. While not an X-3, it shows a very similar arrangement.

I thing what you are looking at is pair of thin-walled brake-bent channels, one on each side of the air reservoir. They appear to be attached to the centersill and are cut at an angle under the running board. These act as a sort of crossbearer to support the air reservoir and AB valve. There could be a plate between them, above the reservoir upon which the AB valve is mounted.

The angled shadow lines make this less apparent, but I think if you ignore the shadows you'll see what I mean. 

This could have been a shop built modification, done at the time of the conversion to AB brakes.

Scott Haycock


 


Lester:

I would defer to Ted or to Steve Hile, but my take (guess) is that there is a pair of those "flaps", one on either side of the reservoir, and that their purpose is to support the reservoir and (likely) the AB valve above.  I also think they must be attached to the centersill.  It looks like some sort of bracket assembly that was applied when the car was converted from KC to AB.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA




Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Dave Parker
 

Lester:

I would defer to Ted or to Steve Hile, but my take (guess) is that there is a pair of those "flaps", one on either side of the reservoir, and that their purpose is to support the reservoir and (likely) the AB valve above.  I also think they must be attached to the centersill.  It looks like some sort of bracket assembly that was applied when the car was converted from KC to AB.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Tim O'Connor
 


I don't have that book, but didn't all UTLX tank cars have square plates mounted
on the running boards (4 plates, facing all 4 directions) for mounting hazard placards?

Tim O'Connor



Working on a UTLX X-3 Resin Car Works tank car.  I have been using Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 2, Tank Cars  by SpeedMedia for additional photo help.  My question is regarding the photo of UTLX 37455 on the bottom of page 77.  Next to the air reservoir on the left side is a plate (guard, mud flap) that appears to be attached to the running board to protect the air reservoir and control valve from wheel spray or maybe a train line bracket which appears to be running through it.  Wondering what the real purpose is.

Thank you, in advance, for your time and effort to look and help.

Lester Breuer


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

frograbbit602
 

Please forgive my typing  error.  It should be Speedwitch Media.
Lester Breuer


UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

frograbbit602
 

Working on a UTLX X-3 Resin Car Works tank car.  I have been using Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 2, Tank Cars  by SpeedMedia for additional photo help.  My question is regarding the photo of UTLX 37455 on the bottom of page 77.  Next to the air reservoir on the left side is a plate (guard, mud flap) that appears to be attached to the running board to protect the air reservoir and control valve from wheel spray or maybe a train line bracket which appears to be running through it.  Wondering what the real purpose is.

Thank you, in advance, for your time and effort to look and help.

Lester Breuer



Re: HO scale truss rods

robertm
 

I doubt one car qualifies as a lot of experience, but I did truss rods on a CV passenger car, steam era, with KS steel wire. Made a jig and bent all the wire the same and it worked very well. It was a BCW kit, had to modify the queen posts, they were too long. It's been a while since I did that so would have to go back and check my files for information.

Bob Moeller
CV Swanton VT 1947-1957
The last decade of CV steam


Re: HO scale truss rods

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Scott,

Yes, Grandt Line is still in the plastic business. They are even developing new products from time to time. I just sent off a large order for O-scale structure parts (that's for my narrow gauge interests).

It does appear that some Grandt Line items have disappeared besides the brass castings. Our recent discussion cited an HO-scale brake set which was not retooled when the mold wore out. Most of their locomotive kits in both O and HO are no longer available, or are only available unpowered.

All this points to the old caveat, "Buy it when you see it." I'm sure glad I stockpiled Branchline boxcar parts when they were still available.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 1/8/17 5:26 AM, 'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Garth,

You scared me the term "close out". I got the impression they were going out of business! But, upon checking the site, it appears they are still selling their parts in plastic, including the queenposts.

Scott Haycock


 

Friends,

Someone mentioned Grandt Line brass queenposts. Sadly, Grandt is no
longer making brass parts except turnbuckles. Here is their close-out
page: http://www.grandtline.com/garage%20sale/garage_sale.html . You
will note that in HO there is only one item left, #86181, low queenposts
cast with their beam. In certain this is a narrow gauge part. Some
O-scale parts are still available.

Of course, those of you lucky enough to have a real hobby shop might
find Grand HO brass queenposts available.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff




Re: HO scale truss rods

Scott H. Haycock
 

Garth,

You scared me the term "close out". I got the impression they were going out of business! But, upon checking the site, it appears they are still selling their parts in plastic, including the queenposts.

Scott Haycock


 

Friends,

Someone mentioned Grandt Line brass queenposts. Sadly, Grandt is no
longer making brass parts except turnbuckles. Here is their close-out
page: http://www.grandtline.com/garage%20sale/garage_sale.html . You
will note that in HO there is only one item left, #86181, low queenposts
cast with their beam. In certain this is a narrow gauge part. Some
O-scale parts are still available.

Of course, those of you lucky enough to have a real hobby shop might
find Grand HO brass queenposts available.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff



Re: HO scale truss rods

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Someone mentioned Grandt Line brass queenposts. Sadly, Grandt is no longer making brass parts except turnbuckles. Here is their close-out page: http://www.grandtline.com/garage%20sale/garage_sale.html . You will note that in HO there is only one item left, #86181, low queenposts cast with their beam. In certain this is a narrow gauge part. Some O-scale parts are still available.

Of course, those of you lucky enough to have a real hobby shop might find Grand HO brass queenposts available.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


Re: Wabash Fowler-type boxcars

Paul Krueger
 

Thanks Ray!  Good to know.

Paul

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA


Re: Kadee.148 couplers

Mark Vinski
 

   Evergreen sells sheets of black styrene in various thicknesses.


http://www.evergreenscalemodels.com/Sheets.htm


 Mark Vinski

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