Date   

Re: Clever Airbrush Accessory

Charles
 

So has anybody actually used it? The guy in the "review" video didn't. How is it supposed to make airbrushing better? Again, the guy in the review didn't say what its purpose was (or maybe he did — I skipped through some it when he was talking a lot and not saying anything). To me, this looks like just something unneccessary, like those dopey trigger things that fit onto a spray can to make it seem like a spray gun.

Charley Hepperle



From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, January 9, 2017 10:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Clever Airbrush Accessory

 
Here is the link to clever accessory:TriggerStix
Bill Welch



Re: UTLX X-3 Photos

Fred_Swa@...
 

On the Steam Era Freight Cars sight Steve Hile posted photos of an X-3 
I believe they were in relation to the Virtual Moder's Yahoo Group's build of Sunshine's X-3.  On that group there is quite a bit of information on building the model and the prototype. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/virtualmodelers/conversations/messageshttps://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/virtualmodelers/conversations/messages
The tankcar was the first build on this site.

 

Fred Swanson

 




---In STMFC@..., <sartherdj@...> wrote :

John,  

Nice photos. Thanks for sharing them.  It is always nice to see photos of prototype equipment details taken by modelers for building a scale model.  Will the model you build be in HO scale or O-Scale P:48?

Later,  Dave Sarther   Tucson, AZ


-----Original Message-----
From: John Golden golden1014@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: stmfc <stmfc@...>
Sent: Mon, Jan 9, 2017 4:51 am
Subject: [STMFC] UTLX X-3 Photos

 
Gents,
 
FWIW, I have a bunch of X-3 photos on my blog at https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/2016/11/10/utlx-x-3/ including photos of the brake gear installation.  This car is "preserved" at the Dennison, Ohio, railroad museum.
 
John

John Golden
Albersbach, DE

https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Clever Airbrush Accessory

Bill Welch
 

Here is the link to clever accessory:TriggerStix

Bill Welch


Using Krystal Klear for Windows or as an Adhesive

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

When using KK for windows ...

KK does not normally dry in less than 4 to as much as 24
hours. It will usually skin over in about an hour. I normally
set the model aside for 12 to 24 hours.
After you close the space up with the toothpick draw the
toothpick out very slowly - do other windows on the same
side of the model - and set it down with the window side UP.
This will create a window that is all one thickness.
The thickness of the window frame determines the
thickness of the KK window. If you are doing a blue box
Athearn caboose they will be "coke bottle thick" - and
you will have to apply KK more than once in order to
get it to have a flat appearance. You can add more KK
layers on top of layers that aren't fully dry ... but if they
haven't at least fully skinned over you will have to wait
before applying a following layer. Multiple layers can
take 2 or more -days- to dry fully.
KK wants to/will almost always form a fillet at any
corner ... it will not lay flat against an edge that is 90
degrees from the face. This can/will create a 'wrong'
look. An additional layer that fills the space will
correct this - be careful about not getting too much
across the window face because it can also have a
curl down at the edges which looks just as 'wrong'.
Using KK for windows on painted brass models is
surprisingly easy/effective. The walls of brass
models are thin and it only takes one time to get
a window that looks darn good.
KK will never look as transparent/flat as using
some clear plastic (acetate or styrene) or actual.
And it won't have that mirror like aspect to the
surface that reflects the surroundings. But it
still can be used very effectively ... and most guys
won't notice that you didn't use the good stuff.

Using KK as an adhesive ...

KK makes an -excellent- adhesive and for certain
applications it is unsurpassed. Yes, it has a -very-
slow drying time ... but that can be an asset as well
as an issue.
You have to 'support' the two parts in such a way
that they don't move while the KK dries and sometimes
that is difficult.
Because it forms a fillet - KK is much stronger for
joining parts that need it. Such as gluing the cab
shades on an HO diesel.
Because KK dries -clear- you can use it on painted
models. Often, especially if you use care in how
much KK you use, any 'extra' amount of KK will be
invisible ... or at most form a clear puddle that
resembles "ice".
KK accepts all types of paint (they all stick to it).
Be doubly certain it is fully dry before you paint
over it. I use 48 hours as my rule of thumb for
how long after applying KK that I will paint it.
KK can form an adhoc "bracket" ... for instance
you can apply it up and over the edges of a lead
weight and when it is dry it will hold the lead in
place 'for ever'.

KK does not get soft due to humidity - but if you
apply a drop of water on it and set it aside for at
least an hour (some times as long as 2 or even 4)
it will soften and the two parts previously glued
to each other can be separated. With enough
time and reapplication of KK its former presence
on a part(s) can be undetectable.

I believe that KK is "some form of white glue". I
don't know what Microscale adds to it. I don't
really care. I consider it to be "worth it".
Yes, you can add some water to a bottle of KK
and recover its previous consistency if you left
it open by accident. How much? I just guess.
(Start small and add more if not enough?)

No, KK is not my "go to" product for windows or as an
adhesive ... it is "one of the options that I consider".
I do find I use it "once in every week when I'm doing
any modeling on 4 or more days of that week" ... YMMV.
- Jim B.


Re: UTLX X-3 Photos

Dave Sarther
 

John,  

Nice photos. Thanks for sharing them.  It is always nice to see photos of prototype equipment details taken by modelers for building a scale model.  Will the model you build be in HO scale or O-Scale P:48?

Later,  Dave Sarther   Tucson, AZ


-----Original Message-----
From: John Golden golden1014@... [STMFC]
To: stmfc
Sent: Mon, Jan 9, 2017 4:51 am
Subject: [STMFC] UTLX X-3 Photos

 
Gents,
 
FWIW, I have a bunch of X-3 photos on my blog at https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/2016/11/10/utlx-x-3/ including photos of the brake gear installation.  This car is "preserved" at the Dennison, Ohio, railroad museum.
 
John

John Golden
Albersbach, DE

https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: UTLX X-3 Photos

Dave Parker
 

John:

As always, I defer to Steve Hile in all things UTLX, but I do know that his database shows the last X-3s being built in 1937.  So, if the trucks are from 1948, they are replacements, not originals.

I should also note that, beginning in 1927, the ARA/AAR/ICC regs called for stamping the car class, manufacturer's initials, and original tank-test date into the center of the car-ends.  Small letters (3/8" minimum) that may be hard to spot, especially if there are many layers of paint.  Their presence would allow one to nail down the builder and car series, while their absence would provide some more general clues.

Great photos that should help a lot of folks in building their RCW kits.  Thanks for posting.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA





NP double hinge door reefers

Eric Hansmann
 

The Northern Pacific rostered 500 refrigerator cars with a double hinge door. Lester Breuer shares his work in building a resin and plastic kit for these prototypes in the latest Resin Car Works blog post. Check it out!

http://blog.resincarworks.com/northern-pacific-refrigerator-car/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

The Santa Fe acquired controlling interest in the D&RG (later the D&RGW) for a short period of time in the late 19th Century. 
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Monday, January 9, 2017 3:23 AM, "Howard R Garner cascaderail@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
>
> Sun Jan 8, 2017 6:19 pm (PST) . Posted by:
> "Tom Birkett" tnbirke@...
> I think they owned the Colorado Midland for awhile
>
> Tom Birkett, Bartlesville, o

But the Colorado Midland was always a standard gauge railroad.

Howard Garner

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus




UTLX X-3 Photos

golden1014
 

Gents,
 
FWIW, I have a bunch of X-3 photos on my blog at https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/2016/11/10/utlx-x-3/ including photos of the brake gear installation.  This car is "preserved" at the Dennison, Ohio, railroad museum.
 
John

John Golden
Albersbach, DE

https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: Clear Resin Castings

earlyrail
 


Sun Jan 8, 2017 6:19 pm (PST) . Posted by:
"Tom Birkett" tnbirke@sbcglobal.net
I think they owned the Colorado Midland for awhile

Tom Birkett, Bartlesville, o

But the Colorado Midland was always a standard gauge railroad.

Howard Garner


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Steve SANDIFER
 

I have sent some photos to a new Album on the website, X-3 details. They will be available when approved.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 7:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

 

 

Steve, Folks,

 

Having been able to pull out the photo and look, I can say that even without the photo, Steve nailed it ;)  And I must say that I fee MUCH more confident in my UTL minutia due to an absolutely awesome clinic that Steve gave on this very subject at Cocoa.  I can't wait to dig out my UTLX cars and get to work!

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, Al (Just got back 2 hours ago!)

 


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of shile@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 2:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

 

 

Without having the picture in front of me, I believe that Dave in correct.  When the X-3's were converted to AB brakes, the air reservoir and AB valve are supported by a pair of heavy stampings that are riveted to the center sill and also help support the running board.  There is a good photo showing this installation in the prototype data document on the RCW webpage at

 

 

Let me know if there is something else needed in this area.

 

Please note that Frank left out the small triangular gusset on the outside of each tank saddle casting and didn't mention how to address this issue in the instructions. I cut small right triangles from a piece of Evergreen HO 1x4 styrene and glued it, on edge, against the tank saddle casting.

 

Hope this helps.  From sunny but cool Florida in the wake of a fine Prototype Rails meet.

 

Steve Hile


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Tim O'Connor
 


I agree, not "optical quality" - However, I wonder if I had a fine window
mesh (perhaps N scale?) if it would make a nice "glass brick" window - not
clear, but definitely translucent. I may try it...

Tim O'Connor



I've tried that before & still have some, but the windows have come out "wavy" & not flat & perfectly clear like "acetate" does/is. Unless I didn't do it properly enough. Guess I might not have  "mastered that step" yet.

Paul Hillman



Paul...

Micro scale has a product called Kristal Klerk which call be used to create clear windows and it dries clear in an hour or so. The first time that you try it, it can be frustrating but practice first. Basically, you dip a toothpick it the jar, transfer the material to all inside edges of the window, and then get some more on the toothpick and "pull" the material across the window to completely fill it. Once you successfully master that step, it works like a charm.

Jack Burgess


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Paul Hillman
 

Hello Jack, 

I've tried that before & still have some, but the windows have come out "wavy" & not flat & perfectly clear like "acetate" does/is. Unless I didn't do it properly enough. Guess I might not have  "mastered that step" yet.

Paul Hillman




From: STMFC@... on behalf of Jack Burgess jack@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 8:59 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings
 
 

Paul...

Micro scale has a product called Kristal Klerk which call be used to create clear windows and it dries clear in an hour or so. The first time that you try it, it can be frustrating but practice first. Basically, you dip a toothpick it the jar, transfer the material to all inside edges of the window, and then get some more on the toothpick and "pull" the material across the window to completely fill it. Once you successfully master that step, it works like a charm.

Jack Burgess 





On Sun, Jan 8, 2017 at 8:28 PM -0500, "chris_hillman@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?


Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Jack Burgess
 

Paul...

Micro scale has a product called Kristal Klerk which call be used to create clear windows and it dries clear in an hour or so. The first time that you try it, it can be frustrating but practice first. Basically, you dip a toothpick it the jar, transfer the material to all inside edges of the window, and then get some more on the toothpick and "pull" the material across the window to completely fill it. Once you successfully master that step, it works like a charm.

Jack Burgess 





On Sun, Jan 8, 2017 at 8:28 PM -0500, "chris_hillman@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?


Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Thomas Birkett
 

I think they owned the Colorado Midland for awhile

Tom Birkett, Bartlesville, ok



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, January 08, 2017 7:55 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings





Chuck, I thought of doing something like that but I'd rather have full
windows.

I think the Santa Fe was actually considered a "short-line" the first day
their construction started, but it didn't end up that way after time. Don't
actually know if it ever had any narrow-gauge. Interesting question.

Paul Hillman



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of Charles
Hladik RUTLANDRS@aol.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 7:36 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings





Paul,

Without actually seeing the piece, I suggest that you paint "the post"
the caboose color and trim it to look as though it's open.

By the way, is this Santa Fe some sort of short line or a narrow gauge?

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division







-----Original Message-----
From: chris_hillman@msn.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sun, Jan 8, 2017 8:28 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings



I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and
find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part
of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical
"post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using
the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending
areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back,
but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time
is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster
than 72 hours?



Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Paul Hillman
 

Chuck, I thought of doing something like that but I'd rather have full windows.

I think the Santa Fe was actually considered a "short-line" the first day their construction started, but it didn't end up that way after time. Don't actually know if it ever had any narrow-gauge. Interesting question.

Paul Hillman




From: STMFC@... on behalf of Charles Hladik RUTLANDRS@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 7:36 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings
 
 

Paul,

    Without actually seeing the piece, I suggest that you paint "the post" the caboose color and trim it to look as though it's open.

    By the way, is this Santa Fe some sort of short line or a narrow gauge?

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division




-----Original Message-----
From: chris_hillman@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Jan 8, 2017 8:28 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings

 
I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.
I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.
I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).
Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Clear Resin Castings

Charles Hladik
 

Paul,

    Without actually seeing the piece, I suggest that you paint "the post" the caboose color and trim it to look as though it's open.

    By the way, is this Santa Fe some sort of short line or a narrow gauge?

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



-----Original Message-----
From: chris_hillman@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Jan 8, 2017 8:28 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Clear Resin Castings

 
I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.
I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.
I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).
Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Clear Resin Castings

Paul Hillman
 

I'm assembling some Walthers Santa Fe 1300 class cabooses (way cars) and find the clear, cupola side-window castings to be rather poor. The back part of the casting stops in the middle of the 2 windows and leaves a vertical "post" looking thing instead of being just a clear looking window.

I could correct this by making a new mold & casting of the clear part using the original as a pattern & adding some styrene strips over the offending areas.

I have some "Easy Cast" - "Clear Casting Epoxy" that I bought awhile back, but upon reading the instructions it turns out that the complete curing time is 72 hours (3 days).

Anyone know of a clear casting material for this purpose that cures faster than 72 hours?


Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Bruce Smith
 

Steve, Folks,


Having been able to pull out the photo and look, I can say that even without the photo, Steve nailed it ;)  And I must say that I fee MUCH more confident in my UTL minutia due to an absolutely awesome clinic that Steve gave on this very subject at Cocoa.  I can't wait to dig out my UTLX cars and get to work!


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, Al (Just got back 2 hours ago!)



From: STMFC@... on behalf of shile@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 2:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo
 


Without having the picture in front of me, I believe that Dave in correct.  When the X-3's were converted to AB brakes, the air reservoir and AB valve are supported by a pair of heavy stampings that are riveted to the center sill and also help support the running board.  There is a good photo showing this installation in the prototype data document on the RCW webpage at

http://resincarworks.com/extras/kit4-01_UTLX10kX-3_protodata.pdf

Let me know if there is something else needed in this area.

Please note that Frank left out the small triangular gusset on the outside of each tank saddle casting and didn't mention how to address this issue in the instructions. I cut small right triangles from a piece of Evergreen HO 1x4 styrene and glued it, on edge, against the tank saddle casting.

Hope this helps.  From sunny but cool Florida in the wake of a fine Prototype Rails meet.

Steve Hile


Re: UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo

Steve SANDIFER
 

These should help from UTLX 54679, an X-3 preserved in El Dorado, Kansas.
What you see in Ted's book are these stampings which support the break
cylinder and triple valve as well as the running board.





__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, January 8, 2017 1:20 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] UTLX Tank Car 37455 photo






I don't have that book, but didn't all UTLX tank cars have square plates
mounted
on the running boards (4 plates, facing all 4 directions) for mounting
hazard placards?

Tim O'Connor




Working on a UTLX X-3 Resin Car Works tank car. I have been using Steam Era
Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 2, Tank Cars by SpeedMedia for
additional photo help. My question is regarding the photo of UTLX 37455 on
the bottom of page 77. Next to the air reservoir on the left side is a
plate (guard, mud flap) that appears to be attached to the running board to
protect the air reservoir and control valve from wheel spray or maybe a
train line bracket which appears to be running through it. Wondering what
the real purpose is.

Thank you, in advance, for your time and effort to look and help.

Lester Breuer

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