Date   

Re: High Detail semi-scale wheel sets by IMRC

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/24/2017 8:49 PM, Doug Dolloff doug_irc@... [STMFC] wrote:
Jared,
       Our  current line will be continued. I will get some photos on our website asap.

Best regards,
Doug Dolloff
Senior Vice President
InterMountain Railway Co

    Still don't see any pictures, location ????

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: MISSOURI PACIFIC SNOWPLOW QUESTIONS

Charlie Duckworth
 

Bill
During the late steam era/early diesel these were painted black with white stenciling. Later th eMoW equipment was painted Mopac BCR I ‘think’ the plow was painted aluminum but need to find a photo to verify.

Lettering was M.P.X. 9” high and numbers were 7” high. There were made from former steam locomotive tenders. Mask Island decals (caboose set) should work.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: MISSOURI PACIFIC SNOWPLOW QUESTIONS

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

GOOGLE is your friend!  After a simple search (“mopac snowplow”) I found the following site:

Scroll down until you get to the snowplow section and I think that will solve your problem with prototype photos.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 27, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Bill Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

While maintenance of way equipment might not be a freight car one would have cleared the path for the trains of steam era freight cars. Hope that this message is within the scope of the group.

I was digging in the storage cabinets yesterday afternoon looking for "things" brass to paint. One of the items was a Hallmark Models Missouri Pacific snowplow. An interesting little critter. My questions are:
- what was the paint scheme for the bit of MW equipment?
- what lettering was applied?
- does anyone have a recommendation of what decals to be used?

Thanks, Cheers, & Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA




------------------------------------
Posted by: Bill Keene <bill41@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
   http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/

<*> Your email settings:
   Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
   http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/join
   (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
   STMFC-digest@...
   STMFC-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
   STMFC-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
   https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/



Re: White Swan billboard reefers

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 1/27/2017 10:36 AM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI bpehni@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

That’s a lot of HO scale shortening!

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

Selective compression?

Spen Kellogg


Re: MISSOURI PACIFIC SNOWPLOW QUESTIONS

 

On Jan 27, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Bill Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

While maintenance of way equipment might not be a freight car one would have cleared the path for the trains of steam era freight cars. Hope that this message is within the scope of the group.

I was digging in the storage cabinets yesterday afternoon looking for "things" brass to paint. One of the items was a Hallmark Models Missouri Pacific snowplow. An interesting little critter. My questions are:
- what was the paint scheme for the bit of MW equipment?
- what lettering was applied?
- does anyone have a recommendation of what decals to be used?

Thanks, Cheers, & Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


MISSOURI PACIFIC SNOWPLOW QUESTIONS

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hello Group,

While maintenance of way equipment might not be a freight car one would have cleared the path for the trains of steam era freight cars. Hope that this message is within the scope of the group.

I was digging in the storage cabinets yesterday afternoon looking for "things" brass to paint. One of the items was a Hallmark Models Missouri Pacific snowplow. An interesting little critter. My questions are:
- what was the paint scheme for the bit of MW equipment?
- what lettering was applied?
- does anyone have a recommendation of what decals to be used?

Thanks, Cheers, & Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Re: C&O covered hopper question

Benjamin Hom
 


Alex Schneider asked:
"I have two Lifelike covered hopper cars by. While the wheels and couplers need to be replaced, and I intend to improve the details, they seem to be decent “background” models. They are both numbered C&O 1143 so at least one needs to be renumbered.
 
The NEB&W Guide to Steam-Era Freight Car Modeling, covered hopper section begins on page 517. The principal subsections are (1) rebuilt covered hopper cars and (2) the ACF design. The former includes discussion of Athearn, Cannonball Car Shops, Tichy and Varney models, while the latter is represented by an Eastern Car Works model. I presume Lifelike acquired the Varney design and produced the models I own.
 
Looking in the ORER for Jan 1953 (NMRA reprint) there are three groups of 35 foot C&O covered hopper cars listed, with identical dimensions.
 
400- 449 ( 50 cars)
600- 799 (200 cars)
899-1299 (498 cars)
 
Are there any spotting differences that should guide my renumbering?"

Surprised nobody answered this one yet...

Alex, the quick answer is none of the above.  You're barking up the wrong tree if you're using 35 ft covered hoppers as your entering argument.

While the details of the Varney/Life-Like twin hopper follows that of the USRA twins (7 side posts, triangular gussets at the outermost side posts, short channel end supports, no boxy end sill), the model is significantly undersized and is nowhere near 35 ft long   Coincidentally, this makes it roughly the same size as what the late Bob Karig referred to as the "1905 Common Standard" twin.  Large numbers of these early steel cars were acquired by Northeastern roads, including B&O, NYC and subsidiaries, and C&O.  Major spotting features were 30 ft IL, 10 ft height of top chord above rail, 7 side posts, and boxy end sills.  (Details such as appliances, trucks, and end supports varied by road).

C&O rebuilt a total of 24 cars to covered hoppers, adding roofs, changing the slope sheet angles, and modifying the discharges.  Number series were as follows:

C&O 200-208, rebuilt from cars in C&O 60000-61999 in 1932, retired by 1950.
C&O 209-218, rebuilt from cars in C&O 60000-61999 in 1934, retired by 1950.
C&O 219-223, rebuilt from cars in C&O 60000-61499 in 1936, retired by 1950.

Low-resolution broadside builder's photos of these cars are online at the C&O Society archive page (call numbers COHS-40693 and COHS 40694).

If you're after quickie models, I'd file away the triangular gussets, change the end supports, and add the boxy end sills along with your other improvements.  Your call on the other changes (slope sheets, discharges); additionally, the model is still significantly narrow compared to the prototype.  (I've toyed with the idea of cutting apart and splicing in styrene to widen the carbody, but it's down the priority list.) 

See "Freight Car Equipment of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway August 1, 1937" for more information.


Ben Hom


Re: White Swan billboard reefers

 

That’s a lot of HO scale shortening!





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni


Re: White Swan billboard reefers

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Bernd,
 
Beautiful work!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2017 1:12 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: White Swan billboard reefers

Ready!
All my five White Swan reefers are ready and now they will receive a little bit aging and dust yet. This will be done by a friend who has realized already the painting and decaling.

http://us-modelsof1900.de/wp-content/gallery/whiteswan-reefer/whiteswan_88kk.jpg


Re: 240V power surge experience, and ...caution.

 

In my neck of the woods, power goes out all the time. Most of my electronics are therefore on UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply) AKA expensive surge protectors.





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, January 27, 2017 at 10:17 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>, PCL List <PassengerCarList@yahoogroups.com>, JMRI JMRI <jmriusers@yahoogroups.com>, Digitrax <digitrax@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] 240V power surge experience, and ...caution.





You will excuse me for cross posting this message, but I feel that its message has import for most of us in this hobby living in regions with 120V power systems.

A week ago we underwent a momentary storm-related 240V power surge at the moment a large tree took down our 120V electrical service line (taking down telephone and cable lines, three other large trees, and pulling up and breaking the water main at the same time). We are still picking up the pieces as the surge took out virtually every single piece of electronics in the house that was not protected by a surge protector, or a transformer, or was ON at the time of surge. The surge protectors successfully shielded all computers, TVs and layout electronics (although enough current got through to blow a 1.5A fuse on the power supply for my DCC command station). These surge protectors committed suicide in the process, each and every one of them useless, blown and dead for any further service.

Notably not surviving -to date- are a kitchen oven, a refrigerator, two garage door openers, electronic air filter systems, and three stereo rack HiFi components -none protected.

Blown (read: exploding) transformers protected a brand new furnace (two days old), and a door bell.

Just replacing the 1.5A fuse on an old Loy’s Toy’s Fuel Tank power supply brought my layout and all of its components once again alive and kicking.

I mention all of this as a cautionary tale emphasizing the importance of surge protectors shielding all of our electronics.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: 240V power surge experience, and ...caution.

Al Kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

WOOOWWWW!

On January 27, 2017 at 11:17 AM "Anspach Denny danspachmd@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

You will excuse me for cross posting this message, but I feel that its message has import for most of us in this hobby living in regions with 120V power systems.

A week ago we underwent a momentary storm-related 240V power surge at the moment a large tree took down our 120V electrical service line (taking down telephone and cable lines, three other large trees, and pulling up and breaking the water main at the same time). We are still picking up the pieces as the surge took out virtually every single piece of electronics in the house that was not protected by a surge protector, or a transformer, or was ON at the time of surge. The surge protectors successfully shielded all computers, TVs and layout electronics (although enough current got through to blow a 1.5A fuse on the power supply for my DCC command station). These surge protectors committed suicide in the process, each and every one of them useless, blown and dead for any further service.

Notably not surviving -to date- are a kitchen oven, a refrigerator, two garage door openers, electronic air filter systems, and three stereo rack HiFi components -none protected.

Blown (read: exploding) transformers protected a brand new furnace (two days old), and a door bell.

Just replacing the 1.5A fuse on an old Loy’s Toy’s Fuel Tank power supply brought my layout and all of its components once again alive and kicking.

I mention all of this as a cautionary tale emphasizing the importance of surge protectors shielding all of our electronics.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


 


240V power surge experience, and ...caution.

Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

You will excuse me for cross posting this message, but I feel that its message has import for most of us in this hobby living in regions with 120V power systems.

A week ago we underwent a momentary storm-related 240V power surge at the moment a large tree took down our 120V electrical service line (taking down telephone and cable lines, three other large trees, and pulling up and breaking the water main at the same time). We are still picking up the pieces as the surge took out virtually every single piece of electronics in the house that was not protected by a surge protector, or a transformer, or was ON at the time of surge. The surge protectors successfully shielded all computers, TVs and layout electronics (although enough current got through to blow a 1.5A fuse on the power supply for my DCC command station). These surge protectors committed suicide in the process, each and every one of them useless, blown and dead for any further service.

Notably not surviving -to date- are a kitchen oven, a refrigerator, two garage door openers, electronic air filter systems, and three stereo rack HiFi components -none protected.

Blown (read: exploding) transformers protected a brand new furnace (two days old), and a door bell.

Just replacing the 1.5A fuse on an old Loy’s Toy’s Fuel Tank power supply brought my layout and all of its components once again alive and kicking.

I mention all of this as a cautionary tale emphasizing the importance of surge protectors shielding all of our electronics.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


2017 RPM-East update

Eric Hansmann
 

My apologies if you received this through a YahooGroup list posting, but we are trying to spread the word!

 

There will be plenty of action March 24 & 25 at this prototype modeler gathering in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. Make your plans to attend RPM-East and rekindle your modeling efforts after a cold winter!

 

 

 - 30+ prototype and model presentations spread across two days

 - a large display room to share your modeling efforts and learn new techniques

 - More than a dozen vendors selling prototype modeling supplies

 - Thursday evening operating sessions on local model railroads

 - an informal Saturday buffet

 - Nine local model railroad layouts open for a Sunday visit

 

Early-bird registration is only $35, with an additional banquet cost of $28.

The early-bird registration ends on March 1st.

Single day registrations are available!

There is a special hotel room rate of $104 per night.

 

Registration forms, hotel information and more can be found at the RPM-East website:

http://www.hansmanns.org/rpm_east/index.htm

 

 

Learning and sharing since 2001; register now for RPM-East!

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RPM-East web and publicity guy

 


Re: Train operation and graphs

Jack Burgess
 

Check out



http://www.opsig.org/



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2017 7:42 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Train operation and graphs








Working on train graphs for the layout has opened some questions.

Making a graph of the actual minutes a trains move from station to station is easy, changing that to more real distance and time is different.

Maybe this is not the correct group to ask. Does any one know of a group that discusses this process?

Ron Christensen










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Train operation and graphs

ron christensen
 

Working on train graphs for the layout has opened some questions. 

Making a graph of the actual minutes a trains move from station to station is easy, changing that to more real   distance and time is different.

Maybe this is not the correct group to ask.  Does any one know of a group that discusses this process?

Ron Christensen


Re: PRR X25 and Other Questions

Gene Green <genegreen1942@...>
 

When, during World War Two, the US Army bought box cars from the M&StL and specified that a certain number of them had to have K brakes.  No reason given in the paperwork I have seen
 
Gene Green
Out in the Badlands of New Mexico


Tank car deliveries

Paul Catapano
 

 
I'm sure there are many examples of tank car deliveries direct to individual service stations. Is this, as a percentage of the total service stations in business, a common practice?

Paul Catapano



Re: Tank Car Deliveries To Gas Stations?

George
 

There was a Texaco dealer in Maine on the Maine Central, named Jimmy's. They had a gas station/garage/truck stop style diner and oil delivery business between the mainline and Washington St. in Auburn. They had no large storage tanks so product was unloaded directly into an underground tank for the gas station and into delivery trucks. This rail business lasted until about 1970.

George Melvin

Readfield, Maine


Re: White Swan billboard reefers

Bernhard Schroeter
 

Ready!
All my five White Swan reefers are ready and now they will receive a little bit aging and dust yet. This will be done by a friend who has realized already the painting and decaling.

http://us-modelsof1900.de/wp-content/gallery/whiteswan-reefer/whiteswan_88kk.jpg


Re: Tank Car Deliveries To Gas Stations?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I can definitely confirm that this did happen. A family relation (cousins) had a gasoline business in Binghamton NY in the 1920s through to the 1970s. Early in this time period they had two ACF 8,000 gallon tank cars, a dead perfect match for the Life-Like cars, which were painted silver with a black underside, frame and trucks. I discovered this essentially by accident in talking to the son of the man who started and ran the business. It turned out his brother had photos of the cars being delivered by the ERIE to their spur. The gasoline was stored in three or four horizontal cylindrical tanks elevated on a steel supporting framework. The elevation served to provide assistance to the pumps to deliver the gasoline to the cars.



It was a complicated modeling process but I got the herald for “Blitzen Super Charged Gasoline” done by MicroScale, and have the two cars modeled.



“Super Charged” really was, as it turned out that they also supplied the aircraft which landed at the airstrip which was just up the road. In truth, the gasoline they sold was a mix of high octane gasoline with aviation gas, so if you filled up your chariot with Blitzen gas you really did get a pretty substantial kick in the rear end when you put your foot to the floor. I remember my dad talking about the difference it made.



I displayed these models at Cocoa Beach several years ago, and when I locate them again, I’ll post some photos, and maybe I can post photos of their station and the tanks.



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2017 12:22 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Tank Car Deliveries To Gas Stations?





Was there a time when some gas stations received deliveries directly by tank car?



I have come across some possible photographic evidence of this practice and several narrative accounts attesting to this.



Photos



Dome Oil Company station, circa 1920.

<http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/desertdrover/2016418154022_Dome%20Gas.jpg> http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/desertdrover/2016418154022_Dome%20Gas.jpg



Caption: This image of a gasoline station in Detroit, Michigan shows the result of only one of many postwar strikes that affected America as it returned to a peacetime economy. Yank-Wacon truck drivers on strike at the time stopped the deliveries to most filling stations in the area. Motorists line up at a no-name station on September 24, 1945 while waiting to get fuel at one of the few facilities open that received its supplies from a different source, possibly the railroad tanker on the far-left.

<http://theoldmotor.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/det-1080x650.jpg> http://theoldmotor.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/det-1080x650.jpg



Narratives



A 1984 letter from Bill Garner describes some of the industries that were on the Santa Fe's First District in San Bernardino, CA. (Bill was a Santa Fe signal maintainer helper and freight office clerk. He first hired on in 1924. Bill also helped edit "Wheel Clicks", a contemporary account of railroad happenings in the 1930s-1950s published by the Pacific Railroad Society.)



According to the letter, a Union Ice Company spur in San Bernardino extended to a Standard Oil gas station and the last spot on the spur was used for gasoline deliveries "by UTLX tank cars" to the gas station.



Another person stated, "When I was a kid in Detroit there was a string of cheap gas station next to the railroad tracks. This was in Detroit, the motor city. It was on West Fort Street or Jefferson Avenue. I found the sidings on a map one time which had rail lines on it...



There must have been six or eight stations in a row which had tank cars on sidings behind the stations plugged into the ground."



Another person stated, "In Brooklyn, NY, there was the same kind of sidings on the east side adjacent to Manhattan. Real cheap gas and bottled oil. The track was owned by the Standard Oil Company."



Comments?



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

45621 - 45640 of 192836