Date   

Re: Moloco FGE

Bill Welch
 

Brian, no link or photos in your message if that is your intention. I just looked at their website and see a reference but no photos.

I think Jim Eager is now involved w/Moloco and he is a 1960's modeler. I gave him a LOT of post-1960 FGE info.

Bill Welch


Re: Black Southern Pacific 3-Bay Covered Hoppers?

Tim O'Connor
 


 >> I have nothing to add.
 >> Tony Thompson


Well, that much is certainly obvious. ;-)

Tim O'


Moloco FGE

Brian Carlson
 

I see moloco is tooling a new FGE car and had preproduction shots at Springfield. Did anyone see them and is this a pre 1960 car???

Brian J. Carlson


Re: Real Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widths

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Claus asks:

So do do tell - “How did you do that”.

Care to pass along any specifics for the rest of us to try out? Inquiring minds want to know.

Well, I did it in about ten minutes and have to roll back the tapes to remember, but I know I used a combination of acrylic paints out of the tube. I often use Liquitex acrylic paint washes for weathering, and not so much for actually painting anything, but I think I started with a coat of a medium gray, which I mixed from black and white (little black, lots of white). That was not an even smooth coat, just enough to mostly cover the white plastic. I then dry-brushed on some browns, maybe, looking at my selection of these paints, burnt umber, burnt sienna, perhaps just a little Van Dyke red hue for a rust appearance, and also some light application of black on a few boards. One thing that makes this work is that I didn’t let the colors run lengthwise over multiple boards. Some adjacent boards have the same color for less than the full width, but only a few like that. The result is that they are “all the same color,” but if you have ever looked carefully at what real board decks look like they are not “all the same color,” but rather variations of the same basic color. I wish we could do attachments or embed photos on this list, because I don’t think this is worth putting a photo in the files section.

Schuyler


I agree with Andy, though I also have used wood to model wood, for running boards especially. However, I used scribed styrene to
model the wood floor in my DT&I Shake’n’Take model several years ago, using acrylic paints to do so. No scratching at all, no
sandpaper to start, just right on the shiny white plastic – and I have received many compliments and inquiries about “How did you do
that” ever since.

Schuyler

Hi-

At risk of being a contrarian: but any thoughts of using Evergreen Styrene strips? 0.060" is only 0.003" off from 5 inches. Tichy
Trains has instructions for good weathering for plastic flat car decks in their instructions. Decades ago, Narrow gauge & Shortline
Gazette featured an article where the best technique (in my opinion) for simulating miniature weathered wood was with layered paint
on styrene; with scratching down to lower layers with a fiberglass erasure pen. I think real wood always looks like model wood--it
lacks realism and I don't think that it scales down well. I have heard forever that "you can't beat real wood" for weathering. I
disagree.

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA

_____

From: "destorzek@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widt hs?

---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

Actually what I am thinking is to glue down two parallel pieces of of .100 x .100 styrene using a piece of 6-inch wood to keep these
parallel. Then I would initially push then pull the wood past a razor blade secured to remove one scale inch of wood. Still trying
to sort out how to secure the blade. I may build a structure from styrene to hold the blade and glue the structure into place but
still allow me to change blades.

I am sure an idea will come to me in the shower.

Bill Welch
==============
Bill, I think sanding is better. When trying to slice real wood with a blade, the blade will tend to follow the grain. It will
either dig too deeply until it eithet stalls the pushing action or cuts the strip in two diagonally, or, if the grain is running the
other way, force the blade out of the wood. These are all the problems one sees when planing wood with a hand plane, but the cast
iron sole of the plane prevents it. Anything you can build out of styrene will have nowhere near the rigidity of a plane,

Brings to mind a point... did you measure the stripwood? A lot of suppliers don't bother to cut "six inch" scale stripwood to an
actual .069", figuring .0625" is close enough.

Dennis Storzek

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------
Posted by: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
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Yahoo Groups Links


Re: High Detail semi-scale wheel sets by IMRC

Tim O'Connor
 

Jon

I got a look at the "high detail" wheel sets. The difference between
them and regular wheels is that the BACK sides of the wheels are machined
to a prototypical profile. The axles are unchanged. Only the "super" wheel
sets offered by Exactrail included the correct axle shape as well as wheel
faces. I forgot to ask Blaine at Exactrail if they were going to rerun those.

You'll pay a premium for the Intermountain high detail wheels - $4 extra
for a pack of 12, or roughly $5 total for each freight car.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Black Southern Pacific 3-Bay Covered Hoppers?

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 

Tony
You probably were not paying attention Tony, so let me help you -


       You evidently don't understand the original question (I have no idea how much attention you pay), so I have nothing to add.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Black Southern Pacific 3-Bay Covered Hoppers?

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

You probably were not paying attention Tony, so let me help you -

  "I have a friend who is doing a mid to late 1950's Espee three bay covered hopper for someone else.
      It was already partially finished in black, and he's hoping not to have to strip and repaint it. "


I provided information for someone who models the SP who does not want to strip and repaint
a model, but the model would still be completely appropriate for an SP modeler. Sorry for trying to
actually help someone, rather than regurgitating information that is widely available.

Tim O'Connor




  There were black CB&Q Pullman Standard 2893's assigned to loading on the SP in Luning, Nevada.
    Series 85050-85064. Athearn produced a model of these cars in one of their early 2893 runs.

I
think the question was about black SP hoppers, not black CB&Q hoppers.
Tony Thompson


Re: Black Southern Pacific 3-Bay Covered Hoppers?

George Courtney
 

Perhaps if the guy doesn't want to strip the paint, then he could letter it for the CB&Q and run it on an Espee layout?  Just reflecting.

George Courtney


Re: Black Southern Pacific 3-Bay Covered Hoppers?

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 

There were black CB&Q Pullman Standard 2893's assigned to loading on the SP in Luning, Nevada.
Series 85050-85064. Athearn produced a model of these cars in one of their early 2893 runs.


    I think the question was about black SP hoppers, not black CB&Q hoppers.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II

Tim O'Connor
 

I've actually never sprayed SC II so I can't speak to what happens with it.
I routinely have used combinations of SC I, AP/TP/Star, Floquil and water base
acrylics and have never had any weird problems. I think I mentioned before that
AP/TP/Star always dissolves in its own thinner (it never polymerizes) so one has
to take care when doing multiple coats, especially one coat over another. Now I
wonder from Schuyler's description whether SC II also has this feature of never
polymerizing.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widt hs?

Bill Welch
 

Yes, a friend sent me message about a similar if not identical tool from Micro-Mark.

Bill Welch


Re: Black Southern Pacific 3-Bay Covered Hoppers?

Tim O'Connor
 


There were black CB&Q Pullman Standard 2893's assigned to loading on the SP in Luning, Nevada.
Series 85050-85064. Athearn produced a model of these cars in one of their early 2893 runs.

Tim O'Connor


I have a friend who is doing a mid to late 1950's Espee three bay covered hopper for someone else. It was already partially finished in black, and he's hoping not to have to strip and repaint it.
The person he's doing the car for is not a serious modelers such as the members of this group, so the model is intended only to be representative of an SP car, not an exact model, however, my friend doesn't want to letter it SP if they didn't have any black cars.

Any and all assistance would be greatly appreciated.

     No black triple covered hoppers.

Tony Thompson


Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widt hs?

Mark Stamm
 

Bill

This might work for your propose. 


Mark

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On Jan 30, 2017, at 12:32 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Actually what I am thinking is to glue down two parallel pieces of of .100 x .100 styrene using a piece of 6-inch wood to keep these parallel. Then I would initially push then pull the wood past a razor blade secured to remove one scale inch of wood. Still trying to sort out how to secure the blade. I may build a structure from styrene to hold the blade and glue the structure into place but still allow me to change blades.


I am sure an idea will come to me in the shower.

Bill Welch


Re: Real Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widths

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Schuyler,

So do do tell - “How did you do that”.

Care to pass along any specifics for the rest of us to try out? Inquiring minds want to know.

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 1:09 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Real Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widths


I agree with Andy, though I also have used wood to model wood, for running boards especially. However, I used scribed styrene to model the wood floor in my DT&I Shake’n’Take model several years ago, using acrylic paints to do so. No scratching at all, no sandpaper to start, just right on the shiny white plastic – and I have received many compliments and inquiries about “How did you do that” ever since.



Schuyler



Hi-

At risk of being a contrarian: but any thoughts of using Evergreen Styrene strips? 0.060" is only 0.003" off from 5 inches. Tichy Trains has instructions for good weathering for plastic flat car decks in their instructions. Decades ago, Narrow gauge & Shortline Gazette featured an article where the best technique (in my opinion) for simulating miniature weathered wood was with layered paint on styrene; with scratching down to lower layers with a fiberglass erasure pen. I think real wood always looks like model wood--it lacks realism and I don't think that it scales down well. I have heard forever that "you can't beat real wood" for weathering. I disagree.



-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA



_____

From: "destorzek@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widt hs?









---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

Actually what I am thinking is to glue down two parallel pieces of of .100 x .100 styrene using a piece of 6-inch wood to keep these parallel. Then I would initially push then pull the wood past a razor blade secured to remove one scale inch of wood. Still trying to sort out how to secure the blade. I may build a structure from styrene to hold the blade and glue the structure into place but still allow me to change blades.



I am sure an idea will come to me in the shower.



Bill Welch
==============
Bill, I think sanding is better. When trying to slice real wood with a blade, the blade will tend to follow the grain. It will either dig too deeply until it eithet stalls the pushing action or cuts the strip in two diagonally, or, if the grain is running the other way, force the blade out of the wood. These are all the problems one sees when planing wood with a hand plane, but the cast iron sole of the plane prevents it. Anything you can build out of styrene will have nowhere near the rigidity of a plane,

Brings to mind a point... did you measure the stripwood? A lot of suppliers don't bother to cut "six inch" scale stripwood to an actual .069", figuring .0625" is close enough.

Dennis Storzek











------------------------------------
Posted by: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Schuyler and List Members,
 
Thanks from me as well Schuyler. I always kinda figured if you applied the paint properly, and waited for it to fully cure, that you could pretty much mix and match the sequence of paint coats with whatever brand you felt like using. Inside knowlege like this will help prevent a paint disaster from happening.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 12:42 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II

Thanks, Schuyler.  This is valuable information for a lot of us. 

I certainly hope your second attempt at painting these diesels is more successful than the first.

PS - I happen to use both acrylics and solvent-based paints, so I guess I'm a straddler.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board widt hs?

Mitchell Mercante
 

Bill,
Perhaps this tool from Micro-Mark may be of some interest to you.
Mitch Mercante

On Monday, January 30, 2017 3:09 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987 -- #yiv8518887987 .yiv8518887987ygrp-photo-title{clear:both;font-size:smaller;height:15px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;width:75px;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987ygrp-photo{background-position:center;background-repeat:no-repeat;background-color:white;border:1px solid black;height:62px;width:62px;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987photo-title a, #yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987photo-title a:active, #yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987photo-title a:hover, #yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987photo-title a:visited {text-decoration:none;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987attach-table div.yiv8518887987attach-row {clear:both;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987attach-table div.yiv8518887987attach-row div {float:left;}#yiv8518887987 p {clear:both;padding:15px 0 3px 0;overflow:hidden;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987ygrp-file {width:30px;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987attach-table div.yiv8518887987attach-row div div a {text-decoration:none;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987attach-table div.yiv8518887987attach-row div div span {font-weight:normal;}#yiv8518887987 div.yiv8518887987ygrp-file-title {font-weight:bold;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987 --#yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0 10px;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp hr {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp #yiv8518887987hd {color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px 0;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp #yiv8518887987ads {margin-bottom:10px;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp .yiv8518887987ad {padding:0 0;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp .yiv8518887987ad p {margin:0;}#yiv8518887987 #yiv8518887987ygrp-mkp .yiv8518887987ad a {color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}#yiv8518887987

I have not measured it but thank you for the reminder to do so Dennis as it may be undersized just enough. In all honesty I am leaning away from sanding because I am so bad at it.
Regarding stabilizing the blade, I know it is hard to picture w/o a picture but I am thinking that I would actually sort of sink the edge of the blade into the base I will create so it cannot move. Whatever I do I promise Rube Goldberg would be proud.
Bill Welch


Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board width?

Bill Welch
 

Amen Tom, Amen

Bill Welch


Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board width?

Tom Madden
 

---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :
>
> I think that most people who know will say I follow the path
> of most resistance, or in other words, why do something the
> easy way when there is a hard way, or . . .

..."Why build one when you can have two at twice the price?"
John Hurt in "Contact"

Tom Madden


Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board width?

Charles Peck
 

Bill, you really need those 6" boards. Not to cut down to 5", but by the time you get a proper ship lap on them,
the exposed surface will be close to 5".  I'm sure you will find a way to do ship lap, after all, just laying boards
side by side would almost be cheating, right?
Chuck Peck in FL

On Mon, Jan 30, 2017 at 5:19 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I think that most people who know will say I follow the path of most resistance, or in other words, why do something the easy way when there is a hard way, or . . .


. . .well you get point.

Bill Welch



Re: Wood Floors in Gondolas—Board width?

Bill Welch
 

I think that most people who know will say I follow the path of most resistance, or in other words, why do something the easy way when there is a hard way, or . . .

. . .well you get point.

Bill Welch

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