Date   

Re: Tangent GATC tank cars

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

I agree

Dale Florence



From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, February 3, 2017 1:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tangent GATC tank cars



Cannot wait for AB brake versions earlier than 1957-58. These are gorgeous models.

Bill Welch





Re: Tangent GATC tank cars

Bill Welch
 

Cannot wait for AB brake versions earlier than 1957-58. These are gorgeous models.

Bill Welch


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

Bill Welch
 

It also attacks their plating as I understand it.

Bill Welch


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

Aley, Jeff A
 

Bill,

 

                Why not?  Should I infer that ammonia is potentially harmful to airbrushes (for the reasons that Tim O’Connor cited – that it attacks metals such as brass)?

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 1:37 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

 

 

FYI NONE of the Airbrush manufacturers recommend getting ammonia anywhere near one of their airbrushes.

 

Bill Welch


Re: Canadian grain in the USA?

George LaPray
 

Yes, some Canadian grain did make it to the US during your time period.  Most of it via lake boat to places like Buffalo.  Canadian imports were often driven by shortages of US grain as a result of drought or other crop problems in the US.  I believe the two most common grains imported were barley (for malting...beer) and specialty wheat like durum (for milling into semolina flour for pasta).

During the period of prohibition in the US there was a marked uptick in imports of single carlots of Canadian grain.  I have talked to old timers in the US grain trade who would tell stories of having their buddies at terminal elevators in Canada load a hundred or so cases of Canadian liquor in the ends of the car and then load the bulk grain completely covering the contraband.  When the car got to its US destination it was usually set aside and unloaded by "management" on weekends when the bulk of the elevator employees were off.

George,
old railroad grain guy


Tangent GATC tank cars

Eric Hansmann
 

Take a closer look at the details of the new Tangent GATC tank cars on the DesignBuildOP blog. Dave Parker offers his observations and prototype info on these new models. 

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2017/02/03/tangent-scale-models-general-american-1917-design-tank-cars/



Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


Re: Canadian grain in the USA?

np328
 

I have got to lean with John,

        I have read in the past * that large amounts of grains came south into the Twin Ports of Duluth and Superior via the DW&P in the early 1900's give or take.

       Have I ever read that some of this grain ever made it down to the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul? No - however I must add that absence of proof is not proof of the contrary.

       Given the large amounts that came into the Twin ports from Canada via the DW&P, I cannot lightly dismiss that some Canadian grain came south to the Twin Cities. Yes, some went out via water and the DSS&A, however grain was in the top six commodities going southbound as per later. 

     Why do I believe Canadian?

    The Northern Pacific Railway sorted eastbound grain from areas west of Staples, (ND, MT) at Staples, MN breaking the grain into train movements east to Twin Ports or Twin Cities. To think they would ship grain to the Twin Ports only to divert it to the Twin Cities strikes me as illogical.

     And northern MN is good for growing lumber, iron ore, and walleyes, however not grain. 

     Looking further, I do find grain as a southbound, and a northbound commodity between the Twin Cities and Twin Ports. It is not specifically listed as Canadian, however I cannot dismiss it as not Canadian.

     Both from NP records from 1926 (NP vs MILW overhead traffic) and a later 1941 letter listing traffic movements support the above. 

      In June of 1926, 202 cars of grain went southbound from the Twin Ports to the Twin Cities on the NP, 58 cars of grain on the CMStP&P. 

      No numbers off the 1941 letter, only in the listings of commodities southbound, it is listed earlier in the six primary shipments as opposed to later.

      As I am modeling this stretch of track in 1953, I am so darn glad this all moved in boxcars as opposed to all the open top cars I need for the lake coal coming south.

                                                                 Hope this helps.    Jim Dick - Roseville, MN

    * NP Rwy Corporate records at the MN Historical Society, Railway Age.


Re: Canadian grain in the USA?

John Riddell
 

I cant find anything specially about supplying Canadian wheat to the mills in Minneapolis but vast quantities of Canadian wheat were shipped by rail through the USA for export from US ports including New York, Boston, Portland Maine, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Norfolk Virginia.
 
Similarly US grain travelled by rail and was exported via Canadian ports such as Montreal, Quebec, St. John and Halifax.
For example, during five crop years (1922-23 to 1926-27) an average of 135 million bushels of Canadian grains annually were exported from US ports against 53 million bushels of American grains were handled through Canadian ports.
 
John Riddell


Re: High Detail semi-scale wheel sets by IMRC

Tim O'Connor
 

approx 1.015

Not a purchase question.

What are the axle length of Intermountain's standard and high detail wheel sets (if different)?

Thanks.

Matt Goodman


Re: High Detail semi-scale wheel sets by IMRC

 

Not a purchase question. 

What are the axle length of Intermountain's standard and high detail wheel sets (if different)? 

Thanks. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Jan 31, 2017, at 7:45 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 
Hello-
The new HO wheel sets from Intermountain, their "High Detail" semi-scale code 88 33" wheels, have arrived.

These sell for a premium (Retail $18/12 pack vs $14/12 pack for their current line). I am offering these at a substantial discount. These are close to fit many trucks, such as TMW, Intermountain, Branchline, P2K and many others.
MSRP of $18/12 pack, purchase from me for $11/12 pack. This is very close to wholesale. I also have the regular 33" semi-scale wheel sets for $9/12 pack. Shipping of $2.85 and up will apply. I accept checks and money orders. I also accept PayPal with a modest fee.
Contact me off-list (Please) at <midcentury@...> Thanks,-Andy Carlson Ojai CA



Re: Canadian grain in the USA?

Tim O'Connor
 

Not all wheat grain is the same. And crop yields obviously differ from year
to year. Which is just my way of saying that if some quantity at some price
that is needed at a US mill were not available in the US, then surely they would
try to buy it from a Canadian source - and vice versa.

Tim O'Connor

I have been researching the flour industry and grain shipping by rail. Did Canadian grain ever make it to the mills of Minneapolis in the pre WW2 era? My research seems to say NO. American flour wasn't competitive in Canada because of tariffs and Canadian grain seems to have exported to the UK or gone to mills in Eastern Canada .Does anyone have different information on this subject? Thanks.

Richard Stallworth


Peddler Cars

thecitrusbelt@...
 

A few questions about peddler cars.

 

Is the term "peddler car" synonymous with the terms "route car" and trap car"?

 

Does a peddler car differ from a generic LCL car by having only one consignor?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Canadian grain in the USA?

richard_stallworth
 

I have been researching the flour industry and grain shipping by rail.  Did Canadian grain ever make it to the mills of Minneapolis in the pre WW2 era?  My research seems to say NO.  American flour wasn't competitive in Canada because of tariffs and Canadian grain seems to have exported to the UK or gone to mills in Eastern Canada .Does anyone have different information on this subject?  Thanks.


Richard Stallworth


Re: Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II

Tim O'Connor
 

Wow, Bill, well if it works for you...

I have a large Branson. The two main hobby cleaners from Branson are an akaline cleanser
"EC" (Monoethanolamine, Morpholine) which smells slightly like ammonia (an ammonia reaction
creates the monoethanolamine) but contains no ammonia, and an acidic formula "OR" that
contains only Citric Acid. The "OR" is good to remove oxides from brass. The "EC" is better
for removing oils, thumbprints, stuff like that. This document lists their cleaners and has
a table showing what effects they have on different materials. There is no ammonia in their
products. As I said in another post I use the cleaner for cleaning only, never stripping.

www.bransonic.com/sites/default/files/Solutions-Overview-pgs.pdf

Metal by the way heats up in an ultrasonic cleaner. I once mistakenly forgot I'd left a
brass car in the cleaner and when I remembered it the next day, the car had become a kit!

Tim O'Connor




Many, many years ago one of the earliest custom painters was a company called Terry Industries.
In correspondence with them I learned that their recommended formula for stripping model paint was
1/3 Ammonia, 1/3 Cleaning liquid (Mr. Clean) and 1/3 Hot Water. I have continually used this formula
over the years.  It is extremely successful on model paints (in an ultrasonic cleaner).

Factory Paint jobs from Korea take a bit more work but this is a good start.  I have not encountered any damage to the brass models.

Bill Pardie


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

Tim O'Connor
 


Most WW fluid is a dilute of ethylene glycol and methanol, both fluids with low
freezing points and both quite poisonous. Methanol is a mild solvent. WW fluid is
an easy way to wash brake fluid off a model if you use that to strip it.

Tim O'



Could you comment please on using a 50/50 mix of windshield washer fluid and distilled water?
Thanks, Spen Kellogg


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

Tim O'Connor
 


Windex contains ammonia. Ammonia weakens brass, and is often used to put
a dark patina onto brass. Brass bullet cartridges exposed to ammonia become
brittle and crack.

I soak brass in lacquer thinner (all "undec" brass models are actually painted
with clear lacquer) and then wash them in warm water with detergent. Stubborn
bits of lacquer are removed with the grit blaster.

Tim O'Connor


I used the ultrasonic cleaner with Windex to clean the BRASS MODELS. They are then rinsed well in distilled water. I never said anything about using Windex with paint or airbrush. Please be careful in reading what I wrote!
Dave


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I used the ultrasonic cleaner with Windex to clean the BRASS MODELS.  They are then rinsed well in distilled water.

 

I never said anything about using Windex with paint or airbrush.  Please be careful in reading what I wrote!

 

Dave

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 4:37 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

 

 

FYI NONE of the Airbrush manufacturers recommend getting ammonia anywhere near one of their airbrushes.

 

Bill Welch


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

Bill Welch
 

Sorry Spen, I could not even venture a guess. Are you thinking windshield washer contains ammonia? If so, I would steer clear. For those wanting to clean airbrushes and using water based Acrylic paints, go with 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. Very effective cleaner with acrylics.

Bill Welch


Re: Ammonia: was Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II and seemingly everything else under the sun

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 2/1/2017 2:37 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

FYI NONE of the Airbrush manufacturers recommend getting ammonia anywhere near one of their airbrushes.


Bill,

Could you comment please on using a 50/50 mix of windshield washer fluid and distilled water?

Thanks, Spen Kellogg


Re: Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Many, many years ago one of the earliest custom painters was a company called Terry Industries.  Among their claims
to fame was that they produced the FBI shield for the TV program with Efferin Zimbalast Jr.  They Also sold and promoted the Bronsen line of ultra sonic cleaners.  In correspondence with them I learned that their recommended
formula for stripping model paint was 1/3 Ammonia, 1/3 Cleaning liquid (Mr. Clean) and 1/3 Hot Water.  I have continually used this formula over the years.  It is extremely successful on model paints (in an ultrasonic cleaner).
Factory Paint jobs from Korea take a bit more work but this is a good start.  I have not encountered any damage
to the brass models.

Bill Pardie

On Feb 1, 2017, at 10:16 AM, 'Bill Baker' bill_baker@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Dave,
 
You have my attention!  Particularly using the 50/50, water/Windex mix in your ultrasonic cleaner.  I wasn't aware of using Windex, much less in so strong a mix.  Please elaborate!  Thank you!
 
Bill Baker

Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 8:35 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II

Anyone with experience of airbrushing TruColor (solvent paint) over brass and other metals? Even with their gray TC primer as an undercoat I still manage to chip the paint off. Very frustrating. But I like the smoothness of TC which makes details  come alive.
Fred Jansz

 

Fred,

 

I’m experimenting with Tru Color paints on a couple of brass cabeese.  I accidentally got a thicker (8xx numbered) flat black, so I had to thin it.  Trust me here, you want the TC thinner as my attempts to use Tamiya or regular lacquer thinner did not work in tests.  Once I got the TC thinner, I was able to match the consistency of the airbrush ready caboose red color I had gotten.  I sprayed it on the brass without a primer and only after cleaning the brass in my ultrasonic cleaner with water and Windex mixed 50/50.  The Tru Color paint goes on in VERY light coats.  I also had to adjust my pressure to about 25 psi to get a smooth coat on some practice material.  So far, I’ve sprayed the trucks and the underbody, but have not gotten enough paint on to declare that I’m finished.   There are still some brass showing through in the area that will be covered by the body (which I tend not to focus upon).  The trucks have a healthy coat.  So far, just handling them very little as they dry, I do not see chipping.

 

Once I’m finished with the last coat of the flat black, I’ll let it dry sufficiently and see how it behaves.   I’m being extra patient (light coat, let dry at least two nights, then next coat) because this is a new paint and I am in no hurry. I’ll let you know if I feel the paint is strong enough.

 

I’ve used some organic solvent based paints before, although I’m very comfortable using Badger ModelFlex water based acrylics.

 

I’ve been thinking that for brass, I want thin, tough coats of paint because I don’t feel as comfortable taking brass models apart and putting them back together and I feel the metal edges are more likely to gouge or rub and wear paint off.  With plastic models for some reason, I don’t feel like the paint comes off as easy (whether organic solvent or water based).  Personal issue. Your mileage may vary.

 

Dave Bott





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