Date   
Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Tim O'Connor
 


A "barrel of oil" (unit of measurement) is 42 gallons. So perhaps that is
the size of the barrels.

Tim O'Connor



Something caught my eye in the photos of those gentlemen loading those barrels.  I rolled a few of the 55 gallon petroleum barrels back in my day during a stint in the Air Force  in the 60s and the barrels in the photo seam to be shorter then the 55 gal type. Perhaps about 3/4 the size of a standard 55 gallon size.. Just saying...
 
G A Jerry Golembowski
Grandy NC

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Donald B. Valentine
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.

Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?

And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?

Schuyler



   Take another look at the photo, Schuyler. What you have identified as a  false floor is on top of the first layer of barrels which makes it closer to what 40 inches or so about the real floor, or the height of a 55 gal. drum. Note that there is a board placed vertically along the outside of the car on the floor which was probably to keep the rings and ends of the barrels from damaging the interior lining if any rough car handling occured. Another vertical board has been nailed to the interior sheathing, again in a vertical position, at the top of the first layer of drums as well, the distance between them being what made you think the "false floor" was only 2 ft. above the real floor. I really don't think there is any false floor involved here, only two boards installed vertically to protect the interior sheathing as these cars were used to transport grain, with some additional boards laid on top of the first layer of drums to provide and even flat surface to keep the second layer of drums from tipping. I'll wager 
that two more vertical boards to protect the interior sheathing for the second layer were added before things
became too tight to do so as well. That at least is the way I would have loaded the car were I in charge of doing so.

Kind of a neat lifting mechanism to lift the drums and note how the workmen in the car is bent over so he does
not hit his head on the underside of the roof supports. That alone indicates the height of the drums in the lower layer of them. The interior height of these cars was only 8 ft. 4 in. and out of the original 1,000 cars in the series (126000 - 125999) there were still 109 of them listed as still in service in my April 1949 ORER. Has
anyone ever offered a model of these fairly common cars? They were seen fairly often in New England.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Germain Golembowski <golembo@...>
 

Reply to all:
 
Something caught my eye in the photos of those gentlemen loading those barrels.  I rolled a few of the 55 gallon petroleum barrels back in my day during a stint in the Air Force  in the 60s and the barrels in the photo seam to be shorter then the 55 gal type. Perhaps about 3/4 the size of a standard 55 gallon size.. Just saying...
 
G A Jerry Golembowski
Grandy NC 

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Bruce Smith
 

Schuyler,

I would disagree with your assessment of the floor. Magnify the image and you can see barrels under the floorwork. At first I thought that the second layer was not high enough, but again, careful perusal of the image shows that the barrels under the floor are upright. It would appear that at least one more layer could be added over the layer currently being loaded.

As for the weight... it's stenciled on the top :)
G (gross) - 360
T (tare) - 10
X (net) - 350

I'll assume that is in pounds, as the Chemical Engineering Catalog of 1922 indicated that a barrel of alkali was between 300 and 400 lbs depending on the formulation.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:04 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.



Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?



And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar





Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.



Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.



<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505



A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?



Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Greg Martin
 

Schuyler and all,
 
This is a typical AAR barrel loading diagram with a second layer. It would be nice to have a shot of the bracing and blocking to show the way it was done in the AAR diagrams. We can't forget that the cars were loaded for weight first and then cubic capacity.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 3/12/2017 12:04:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.

Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?

And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?

Schuyler

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Mark Stamm
 

My guess would be that it secured the barrels in transit. The SLSF boxcar is from series 126000-126999 it has an IH of 8'4". Assuming 55 gallon drums have not changed significantly in height since the 1940's, two drums of approximately 33" in height plus a 2' riser and a layer in between would fill the car to the roofline. 

Mark

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On Mar 12, 2017, at 2:04 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.

Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?

And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.

Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.

<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505

A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?

Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Kadee grabs for early IMWX (nee Red Caboose) kits?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I have a set of IMWX kits representing the 1937 AAR box car for the Southern Railway.  These were early kits and had a nicely representative, but severely oversized grab iron.  It has the staggered holes on the boxcar side for the grab iron bracket to be inserted. Can the Kadee bracket grabs be substituted using the holes in the IMWX/Red Caboose kit?  I know the Kadee grab irons look very similar and are much finer (Yarmouth Model Works’ site even sells a template for drilling holes to use these since Pierre calls the Kadee grabs “superb” http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/Products/YMW-502 ).  I think it would be nice if they

 

I don’t know if it is worth the difference in look to plug the IMWX holes in the kit and use the Yarmouth Works template to add the Kadees.  If I can use the existing holes though, that indeed would be “superb.”   Has anyone tried?  I have 7 kits to build and I don’t currently have Kadee brackets to test.  I’d order the brackets if I knew they would be a simple fit.  I may stick with the oversized for now if I have to plug and drill to use the Kadees.

 

While awaiting an answer, I’ll go back to working on resin kits for my ’34 Southern Winston-Salem division / Atlantic & Yadkin home layout.  These ’37 kits are for my FCSME club trains (ca 1955).

 

Dave

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.



Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?



And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar





Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.



Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.



<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505



A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?



Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?

=========================


Specifically known as grain lines.


Dennis Storzek

Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. 

 

Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.

 

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505

 

A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?

 

Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Feeling Philosophical Toolwise: FWIW

Bill Welch
 

Last night as I was about to turn-in for the evening I realized the reason I like the Single Edge Razor Blade is because it is literally at my finger tips or said another way it is an extension of my fingers whereas trying to use a knife like an X-Acto is more an extension of my hand. My fingers can work finer than my hand.


Bill Welch


Re: Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

Eric Hansmann
 

I don’t know about retouched, but the car looks very clean.

 

There are no distinct chalk marks, but you can see some remnants between the weight data and the Dirt Collector lettering when you zoom in on the image. The trucks do not look grimy. I do not see any route cards remnants that are common on DS box car sides. Note there is one card in the bottom left corner and another on the door.

 

The car has a weigh date of 12-35 but the image data on the page indicates a 1937 photo.

 

The car has been upgraded since it was built in 1919. Note the two grabs on the left side and there is a rotary uncoupling rod on the end that replaced the original Carmer hardware. I see a hint of the K brake dirt collector in the shadows below the car.

 

Possibly the box car was scrubbed for the promotional image in order to look good for the customer.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 3:19 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

 




It also appears that the picture was airbrushed to create the pristine lettering.  Notice that the wood sides only have wood shown in the  appears upper left corner. 

 

Gary Laakso

South of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2017 11:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

 

 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Nice clear photo of Great Northern boxcar 24368 from the
Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. Taken in 1937.

Caption:
A Great Northern freight car advertises Columbia Breweries
"First Car Load Shipment of Canned Beer out of a Pacific Northwest
Brewery, Leadership, Alt Heidelberg Guest Beer". In 1936 the company
reported that they were the first of the Northwest brewers to introduce canned
beer in the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska.
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/35581/rec/1689 
Use the slider above the photo to enlarge it.
 
Is there anything remarkable about this car?"

 

GN 23494-24993, 1500 cars, USRA DS boxcar.

 

 

Ben Hom

 


Re: Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

I don't agree, Gary. When I magnified the image to full size, I was able to make out the stencil cuts, as well as see the grooves continue through the lettering. It's most likely that the car was recently repainted for this shipment.
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:18 AM, "'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
It also appears that the picture was airbrushed to create the pristine lettering.  Notice that the wood sides only have wood shown in the  appears upper left corner. 
 
Gary Laakso
South of Mike Brock
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2017 11:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368
 
 
Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Nice clear photo of Great Northern boxcar 24368 from the
Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. Taken in 1937.

Caption:
A Great Northern freight car advertises Columbia Breweries
"First Car Load Shipment of Canned Beer out of a Pacific Northwest
Brewery, Leadership, Alt Heidelberg Guest Beer". In 1936 the company
reported that they were the first of the Northwest brewers to introduce canned
beer in the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska.
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/35581/rec/1689 
Use the slider above the photo to enlarge it.
 
Is there anything remarkable about this car?"
 
GN 23494-24993, 1500 cars, USRA DS boxcar.
 
 
Ben Hom


Viking Roof- USRA DS Rebuilds

Scott H. Haycock
 

I'm working on a set of CAD drawings for the aforementioned roof, as shown in RPC 24. The drawings shown on page 71 are my reference. These drawings appear to be more suited for the railroad shop crews to use in the actual rebuilding, as they show no dimensions of the roof components themselves.


My questions are: does anyone know of drawings of the components used in these rebuilding kits? My particular interest at this time is the gauge of the steel used to stamp the panels used in this design. Knowing that, I can extrapolate some of the dimensions not on the drawing.


I have some of the viking roofs that are recommended for the Shake N Take projects of a few years ago, but they don't look right compared to the drawings. I'm aware of the fact that these roofs evolved over time, and the modeled roof may be of a different version.

 Does anyone know of a good overhead image of the roof used in the USRA DS rebuilds?


Thanks,


Scott Haycock  

      

Re: Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

gary laakso
 

It also appears that the picture was airbrushed to create the pristine lettering.  Notice that the wood sides only have wood shown in the  appears upper left corner. 

 

Gary Laakso

South of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2017 11:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

 

 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Nice clear photo of Great Northern boxcar 24368 from the
Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. Taken in 1937.

Caption:
A Great Northern freight car advertises Columbia Breweries
"First Car Load Shipment of Canned Beer out of a Pacific Northwest
Brewery, Leadership, Alt Heidelberg Guest Beer". In 1936 the company
reported that they were the first of the Northwest brewers to introduce canned
beer in the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska.
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/35581/rec/1689 
Use the slider above the photo to enlarge it.
 
Is there anything remarkable about this car?"

 

GN 23494-24993, 1500 cars, USRA DS boxcar.

 

 

Ben Hom

Re: PRR Boxcar: Number, Please

pennsylvania1954
 

Ahhhh, truth. PRR class X31a included both cars with single doors and cars with double doors. Series 69000-69499, which included subject 69203, were double door general service boxcars.

Class X31b (and X31c) had a different roof design than X31 or X31a necessitating the subclass change.

This doesn't account for Tim's image of 69245 stenciled as a X31b, which clearly should be a X31a.

I don't think it was the railroad's indifference; certainly the drawings are clear and determinative. More likely it was that the "b" stencil was right next to the "a" stencil, and it was hot that day, and it was Friday afternoon, and the fumes were heavy.....  When you have a lot of cars...a lot of cars...there are bound to be mistakes.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

Re: Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Nice clear photo of Great Northern boxcar 24368 from the
Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. Taken in 1937.

Caption:
A Great Northern freight car advertises Columbia Breweries
"First Car Load Shipment of Canned Beer out of a Pacific Northwest
Brewery, Leadership, Alt Heidelberg Guest Beer". In 1936 the company
reported that they were the first of the Northwest brewers to introduce canned
beer in the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska.
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/35581/rec/1689 
Use the slider above the photo to enlarge it.
 
Is there anything remarkable about this car?"

GN 23494-24993, 1500 cars, USRA DS boxcar.


Ben Hom

Greatest Idea Since Canned Beer...A Clear Photo Of GN 24368

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Nice clear photo of Great Northern boxcar 24368 from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. Taken in 1937.


Caption:

A Great Northern freight car advertises Columbia Breweries "First Car Load Shipment of Canned Beer out of a Pacific Northwest Brewery, Leadership, Alt Heidelberg Guest Beer". In 1936 the company reported that they were the first of the Northwest brewers to introduce canned beer in the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska.

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/35581/rec/1689

Use the slider above the photo to enlarge it.

 

Is there anything remarkable about this car?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Reefer With Butter Load (Misspelled Word)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Yes...misspelled, of all things! You are only the second person among three Yahoo groups totaling over 4,300 members to have caught this.

 

My wife also caught it and caught it immediately but she thought it was a boxcar so I took off points for that.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

SAL '37 AAR enhanced kits

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-

Seaboard Air Line had 100's of class B9 40' boxcars built to the AAR 1937 standard design in 1945. Ajax handbrakes and Apex metal running boards were the most common components. Both even spacing 7 panel Superior doors and 5/6/5 pre-war Youngstown Steel Doors were used.


SAL 19700-19749; built 9-45, 7 panel Superior doors, AAR spring plank 50-ton trucks, Ajax brakes and Apex running boards.
SAL 19750-19799; built 9-45, 7 panel Superior doors, AAR spring plank trucks, Ajax power hand brake and US Gypsum running boards.
SAL 19800-19849; built  9 -45, 5/6/5 pre-war YSD, AAR spring plank, Ajax brake, US Gypsum running board
SAL 19950-19999, built  10-45,  7 panel Superior door, AAR spring plank truck, Ajax brake, US Gypsum running board 
SAL 22200-22499, built  9-45, 5/6/5 pre-war Youngstown Steel Door, AAR spring plank truck, Ajax brake, Apex running board

I am offering some enhanced kits for these SAL '37 AAR box cars.

 SAL B9 #1:  $37, 1st class shipping included
Red Caboose #8002 undec 40' '37 AAR box car kit. Has both 7 panel and YSD.
IMRC Apex running board
Tahoe Model Works Buckeye spring Plank truck, less wheels
4 axles of IMRC High Detail semi-scale code 88 wheel sets with larger axles and accurate back profiled wheels

 SAL B9 #2:  $38, 1st class shipping included
Same, except substitute Yarmouth Models US Gypsum running boards

I accept checks and money orders. With a small fee I also accept PayPal. Contact me off-list (Please) at
Special thanks to Ed Hawkins for his comprehensive 1937 AAR box car owners list.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA