Date   

Re: Underframe Ban

Randy Hees
 

As I understand the 50 year freight car rule, it was created because 1) freight cars were not as routinely updated and upgraded, so were more likely to have obsolete brake valves, draft gear and trucks, and 2) they can roam the North American railroad system, away from home for in some cases years...

There is a wavier program, which allows older cars to be used.  It is most commonly applied to cars in captive service on a single railroad, or on very special cars, like heavy duty cars for special service which are worth updating, and those updates, and history of inspection is used to support the waiver.

Your hopper is likely in captive service, on a single railroad or maybe a pair of railroads...

Randy Hees


Subscribe

John Holmes
 

I inadvertently sent an "unsubscribe" email. I do NOT want to unsubscribe. Please keep me on the mailing list. If I have re-subscribe, please advise how to do this.

Thanks.

John Holmes


Re: Underframe Ban

William Dale
 

As I have been following along on this topic, I photographed a covered hopper in 10-7-2013.  Now I AM FULLY AWARE, that this car exceeds the scope of this group, but it was in service after the "40" years being built in August 1971.  The car in question is PC / CR 888854 (PS-2CD) still wearing its original green paint and trust stencil.  There was a stencil painted on the side, "50 Year Life AAR Rule 88-EXS".  This car was clearly in active interchange delivering ammonium nitrate to the Zehners siding on the Reading & Northern.  Now said, this clearly violates the dates above, I'm no expert by any means, any thoughts, further input would be appreciated.

Bill


Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :


As a note, backhaul would have been arranged by the reefer's owner, PFE, SFRD, FGE, etc... LCL would have been arranged by the railroad. Wouldn't a car being used for LCL need to be owned or leased by the railroad from the refrigerator car company?

========================


Depends... keep in mind some railroads did own their own reefers, Santa Fe, for one, NP...


The Soo Line leased reefers from URTX, but owned their own milk cars (ten). When there was no milk to move, the cars could be found being used a storage mail, LCL, or company material service.

========================

And then there is the strange case of the ex-SFRD RR-23, lettered for the PRR and used for ice service for cabin cars and yard locomotives in Jersey City, New Jersey. 

========================


Very likely a case of a damaged car written off the owner's books, re-purposed by the railroad that paid for it.


Dennis Storzek


Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

I think it might be in order here to note the difference between backhaul, as described by Steve and LCL as described by Jared.  


LCL would have been on-line pickup at multiple stops. Backhaul is would have been a single source carload, usually from somewhere near there the reefer had delivered a refrigerated or "protected" cargo, and would often be interchanged across multiple railroads.  I was well aware of backhaul traffic in reefers but LCL seems like it would be much more unusual, as it really wouldn't fit the traffic pattern of a reefer.  I could see LCL assignments for reefers during off seasons, or after the car was removed from regular service.  


As a note, backhaul would have been arranged by the reefer's owner, PFE, SFRD, FGE, etc... LCL would have been arranged by the railroad. Wouldn't a car being used for LCL need to be owned or leased by the railroad from the refrigerator car company?


And then there is the strange case of the ex-SFRD RR-23, lettered for the PRR and used for ice service for cabin cars and yard locomotives in Jersey City, New Jersey. 


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of harperandbrown@... [STMFC]
Sent: Friday, March 17, 2017 5:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] re: Santa Fe reefer questions
 



A former brakeman/baggageman on Alma branch trains 95/96 said in an interview that a reefer was sometimes used as an LCL car.  Like other cars used for LCL on the Alma branch it was kept spotted near the depot to be loaded or unloaded from a Santa Fe Trailways truck.  Except for this one reference from a former Alma branch train crew member I have no other information on the use of reefers in LCL service.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

---In STMFC@..., wrote :

Reefers were often used in LCL service.

 

Out of season, they were common on branch lines where the LCL was pretty light. You needed a car to carry LCL, but not much of it. The only problem was the 5' door (ATSF) and higher inside floor.

 

On the main line, most reefer traffic was from west to east, so LCL was a way to use the cars headed back west if they were not needed in a big hurry. Magazines and paper product were heavy and needed a clean dry car. Folks like Sears, Montgomery Ward, etc. liked them because they received two for the price of one box car and could load them for specific markets, bypassing regional freight houses.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 9:49 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] re: Santa Fe reefer questions

 

 

I have an image of SFRD 10356, an Rr-46 with the old "backwards"
SFRD hatches, still in service. Also a 1969 image of SFRD 9040, an
Rr-43 with its original hatches - But this particular car carries a
recently applied "MDSE SERVICE RETURN TO AGENT SAN ANGELO TEXAS"
stencil. Merchandise service!

Other 1960's photos with the "normal" ice hatches are all from the
later Rr-5x classes.

Tim O'




Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

Jared Harper
 


A former brakeman/baggageman on Alma branch trains 95/96 said in an interview that a reefer was sometimes used as an LCL car.  Like other cars used for LCL on the Alma branch it was kept spotted near the depot to be loaded or unloaded from a Santa Fe Trailways truck.  Except for this one reference from a former Alma branch train crew member I have no other information on the use of reefers in LCL service.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

---In STMFC@..., <steve.sandifer@...> wrote :

Reefers were often used in LCL service.

 

Out of season, they were common on branch lines where the LCL was pretty light. You needed a car to carry LCL, but not much of it. The only problem was the 5' door (ATSF) and higher inside floor.

 

On the main line, most reefer traffic was from west to east, so LCL was a way to use the cars headed back west if they were not needed in a big hurry. Magazines and paper product were heavy and needed a clean dry car. Folks like Sears, Montgomery Ward, etc. liked them because they received two for the price of one box car and could load them for specific markets, bypassing regional freight houses.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 9:49 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] re: Santa Fe reefer questions

 

 

I have an image of SFRD 10356, an Rr-46 with the old "backwards"
SFRD hatches, still in service. Also a 1969 image of SFRD 9040, an
Rr-43 with its original hatches - But this particular car carries a
recently applied "MDSE SERVICE RETURN TO AGENT SAN ANGELO TEXAS"
stencil. Merchandise service!

Other 1960's photos with the "normal" ice hatches are all from the
later Rr-5x classes.

Tim O'


Re: Santa Fe reefer questions (LCL)

Steve SANDIFER
 

One of the Corwith freight houses had one track 7" lower than the others. Reefers had a floor 14" high than box cars because of insulation. That lower track could be used for either box or reefer with loading grades either 7" up or down, much better than 14" up!

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 17, 2017 4:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] re: Santa Fe reefer questions (LCL)

 

 

As for Santa Fe, in non-peak times Santa Fe was not eager to run their produce reefers back home empty unless they were in great demand for another trip east. In the less busy periods, common dry loads headed west would include newspapers and magazines from East Coast publishers, film, tires, furniture, various clean items, such as canned goods, candy and boxed items, or LCL shipments from companies like the mail order houses in Chicago or Kansas City. 

 

Santa Fe developed the Mahoney transload facility at their Argentine Yard in Kansas City. Box cars of LCL goods were brought to Mahoney where they were transloaded into reefers for various western destinations.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Santa Fe reefer questions (LCL)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

As for Santa Fe, in non-peak times Santa Fe was not eager to run their produce reefers back home empty unless they were in great demand for another trip east. In the less busy periods, common dry loads headed west would include newspapers and magazines from East Coast publishers, film, tires, furniture, various clean items, such as canned goods, candy and boxed items, or LCL shipments from companies like the mail order houses in Chicago or Kansas City. 

 

Santa Fe developed the Mahoney transload facility at their Argentine Yard in Kansas City. Box cars of LCL goods were brought to Mahoney where they were transloaded into reefers for various western destinations.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

Tony Thompson
 

Steve Sandifer wrote:

 
On the main line, most reefer traffic was from west to east, so LCL was a way to use the cars headed back west if they were not needed in a big hurry. Magazines and paper product were heavy and needed a clean dry car. Folks like Sears, Montgomery Ward, etc. liked them because they received two for the price of one box car and could load them for specific markets, bypassing regional freight houses.

    One thing an unloaded ice reefer was NOT was dry inside. The retired PFE guys I interviewed said that the cars were damp inside all their lives. But cargo like magazines and other printed matter was wrapped in bundles with heavy paper if moved in reefers. There was plenty of that traffic, as Steve says.
Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

charles slater
 

Tim I have 2 cars in my collection that still had reverse hatches after the mid 1950's. They are;

Rr-23 32432 in L.A. coach yard Dec. 1981 Think it was used to store Ice

Rr-48 11334 Painted at SB 11-64 and condemned at Argentine in 7-1973 this was one of the three white painted reefers and it lasted a long time.

Charlie Slater

Bakersfield, Ca.


Sent from Outlook




From: STMFC@... on behalf of Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:52 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Santa Fe reefer questions
 
 


I have an image of SFRD 10356, an Rr-46 with the old "backwards"
SFRD hatches, still in service. Also a 1969 image of SFRD 9040, an
Rr-43 with its original hatches - But this particular car carries a
recently applied "MDSE SERVICE RETURN TO AGENT SAN ANGELO TEXAS"
stencil. Merchandise service!

Other 1960's photos with the "normal" ice hatches are all from the
later Rr-5x classes.

Tim O'


Boomer operator

Eric Hansmann
 

I was out on the road visiting a fellow modeling friends recently. One friend models 1905 and had the layout ready to operate for my visit. Check out the details on the DesignBuildOp blog.

 

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2017/03/17/boomer-operator-bay-point-northern/

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

Steve SANDIFER
 

Reefers were often used in LCL service.

 

Out of season, they were common on branch lines where the LCL was pretty light. You needed a car to carry LCL, but not much of it. The only problem was the 5' door (ATSF) and higher inside floor.

 

On the main line, most reefer traffic was from west to east, so LCL was a way to use the cars headed back west if they were not needed in a big hurry. Magazines and paper product were heavy and needed a clean dry car. Folks like Sears, Montgomery Ward, etc. liked them because they received two for the price of one box car and could load them for specific markets, bypassing regional freight houses.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 9:49 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] re: Santa Fe reefer questions

 

 

I have an image of SFRD 10356, an Rr-46 with the old "backwards"
SFRD hatches, still in service. Also a 1969 image of SFRD 9040, an
Rr-43 with its original hatches - But this particular car carries a
recently applied "MDSE SERVICE RETURN TO AGENT SAN ANGELO TEXAS"
stencil. Merchandise service!

Other 1960's photos with the "normal" ice hatches are all from the
later Rr-5x classes.

Tim O'


Re: Underframe Ban

Greg Martin
 

Bob,
 
Minor correction to your post in RED
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 3/15/2017 10:33:16 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I've consulted several sources on the banning of older freight car underframes. For the year 1974 I found two conflicting notes:

 

1974 - No underframes over 40 years if built before July 1, 1974.

 

1974 - No underframes over 50 years if built  AFTER  July 1, 1974.

 

So is 40 or 50 years?

 

And was this a ban from interchange initiated by the industry or did the federal government outlaw such older underframes?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Sand Loads in HO?

Michael Gross
 

Dear Jim,

This is an awfully late reply to our post of March 6, but I have been out of the country and away from my photo stash.

The sand load for my Intermountain Caswell gon was made from a piece of carved balsa sprinkled with fine locomotive sand that I found along the BNSF right-of-way.  Though not true HO "scale," it looked good enough to me.  The raw sand appeared bland so I dry brushed it with off-white acrylic and and sprayed it with a final coat of matte.  I forget if I used an initial wash, but as I usually add both contrasts and highlights, I suspect I did.

I added two photos of the Caswell to my photo file, "Completed Models" so you can see the car for yourself.  If you can't access the file, email me at ActorMichaelGross AT gmail DOT com, and I will send you the pictures directly.

Cheers!

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA



Re: Santa Fe reefer questions

Tim O'Connor
 

I have an image of SFRD 10356, an Rr-46 with the old "backwards"
SFRD hatches, still in service. Also a 1969 image of SFRD 9040, an
Rr-43 with its original hatches - But this particular car carries a
recently applied "MDSE SERVICE RETURN TO AGENT SAN ANGELO TEXAS"
stencil. Merchandise service!

Other 1960's photos with the "normal" ice hatches are all from the
later Rr-5x classes.

Tim O'


Re: New file uploaded to STMFC

riverman_vt@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <STMFC@...> wrote :

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /60-year-old box cars.xlsx
Uploaded by : r_eric_lombard <elombard@...>
Description : Spreadsheet listing 29 series that had 60-year-old cars in service along with their physical characteristics and service history

You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/60-year-old%20box%20cars.xlsx

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398

Regards,

r_eric_lombard <elombard@...>


A great bit of information to have! 

Thanks very much for posting this Eric.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Santa Fe cars in 1934?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Thanks John, great, helpful information!

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Mar 16, 2017, at 6:40 PM, John Barry northbaylines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Dave,

The 66122 would have been one of 500 Fe-S built in 1926.  All of the cars would have had A.T.&S.F. reporting marks.  The Fe-R likely had one inch lines above the reporting mark and below the car number, the others likely not unless repainted in 1925-6.  Most likely all were in the 3' herald on the left of the door above the reporting marks, ARA data on the right scheme that came into place in 1925.  Pre 1919 cars had 4' heralds on the right side of the door and MCB data.  In 1919 the 4' herald swapped to the left side and the data was USRA standard stencilling.  The Fe's had AUTOMOBILE and FURNITURE opposite the herald until 1928 when it reduced to AUTOMOBILE.  Santa Fe tended to repaint its cars regularly, so 1910 paint was unlikely.  The Society Auto car book has an Otto Perry photo of an Fe-R still in original paint circa 1935 with the lines and the Auto & Furn as built paint.

The table below shows some features
  

Class Built Capacity IL IW IH Underframe Sides Ends EndDoor Roof Side doors Trucks
Bx-W 1910 80000 36'0 8'6 8'0 Stl Center+6TR DS DS Outside Flex Metal 1 -6' Wood Andrews  545
Bx-X 1912 80000 36'0 8'6 8'0 Stl Center+6TR DS DS Outside Flex Metal 1 -6' Wood Andrews  539
Fe-M 1910 80000 50'0 9'0 10'0 4 Fishbelly Stl DS DS Plate Stl Outside Flex Metal 1 1/2 - 10' Wood Andrews L1
Fe-M 1910 80000 50'0 9'0 10'0 4 Fishbelly Stl DS DS Plate Stl Outside Flex Metal 1 1/2 - 10' Wood Andrews L1
Fe-Q 1924 80000 50'0 8'10 10'0 2 Fishbelly Stl Sec S 7/5/5 Murphy Outside Flex Metal 1 1/2 - 10' Panel Stl Andrews U
Fe-R 1926 80000 50'0 8'10 10'1 2 Fishbelly Stl Sec S 7/5/5 Murphy Radial Steel 1 1/2 - 10' Panel Stl ARA
Fe-S 1928 100000 50'6 9'2 10'0 ARA Steel DS 4-5 R Dn Radial Steel 2 - 12' Cor Steel Dahlman 2 lvl
Bx-9 100000 40'6 8'7 8'7 ARA Steel DS 3-3 R Dn Radial Steel 1 -6' Cor Stl Dahlman 2 lvl
Bx-15 1910 R1930 70000 36'0 8'6 8'0 Stl Center+6TR DS DS Outside Flex Metal 1 -6' Wood Archbar


Nice find!

 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "'David Bott' dbott@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 11:57 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Santa Fe cars in 1934?

 
I believe there are Santa Fe historians and fans here.  Could you please help me further identify the following freight cars from a 1934 wheel report?  Photos of said cars as near to ’34 as possible (or notes on the lettering for that time period) would also be appreciated.
 
Road
No.
Contents
Destination
Tons
Notes
AT&SF
44428
Beans
Greensboro
91
36' DS box: Bx-W
AT&SF
48955
Hides
N Wilkesboro
45
36' DS box: Bx-X
AT&SF
64284
Furn
Strassburg
23
50' DS DD box: Fe-M
AT&SF
64700
Autos
N Wilkesboro
15
50' DS DD box: Fe-M
AT&SF
64752 !
Co Meal
N&W
5
50' DS DD box: Fe-Q
AT&SF
65411
Autos
Elkin
14
50' DS DD box: Fe-R
AT&SF
66122
Mty
Atlanta
0
?
AT&SF
122250
Mty
Meridian
0
‘24 ARA DS box: Bx-9
AT&SF
243885
Mf Tob
Inman Yds
7
36' DS box: Bx-15
 
 
 
Any help appreciated. 
 
Thanks,
 
Dave Bott



Re: Santa Fe cars in 1934?

John Barry
 

Dave,

The 66122 would have been one of 500 Fe-S built in 1926.  All of the cars would have had A.T.&S.F. reporting marks.  The Fe-R likely had one inch lines above the reporting mark and below the car number, the others likely not unless repainted in 1925-6.  Most likely all were in the 3' herald on the left of the door above the reporting marks, ARA data on the right scheme that came into place in 1925.  Pre 1919 cars had 4' heralds on the right side of the door and MCB data.  In 1919 the 4' herald swapped to the left side and the data was USRA standard stencilling.  The Fe's had AUTOMOBILE and FURNITURE opposite the herald until 1928 when it reduced to AUTOMOBILE.  Santa Fe tended to repaint its cars regularly, so 1910 paint was unlikely.  The Society Auto car book has an Otto Perry photo of an Fe-R still in original paint circa 1935 with the lines and the Auto & Furn as built paint.

The table below shows some features
  

Class Built Capacity IL IW IH Underframe Sides Ends EndDoor Roof Side doors Trucks
Bx-W 1910 80000 36'0 8'6 8'0 Stl Center+6TR DS DS Outside Flex Metal 1 -6' Wood Andrews  545
Bx-X 1912 80000 36'0 8'6 8'0 Stl Center+6TR DS DS Outside Flex Metal 1 -6' Wood Andrews  539
Fe-M 1910 80000 50'0 9'0 10'0 4 Fishbelly Stl DS DS Plate Stl Outside Flex Metal 1 1/2 - 10' Wood Andrews L1
Fe-M 1910 80000 50'0 9'0 10'0 4 Fishbelly Stl DS DS Plate Stl Outside Flex Metal 1 1/2 - 10' Wood Andrews L1
Fe-Q 1924 80000 50'0 8'10 10'0 2 Fishbelly Stl Sec S 7/5/5 Murphy Outside Flex Metal 1 1/2 - 10' Panel Stl Andrews U
Fe-R 1926 80000 50'0 8'10 10'1 2 Fishbelly Stl Sec S 7/5/5 Murphy Radial Steel 1 1/2 - 10' Panel Stl ARA
Fe-S 1928 100000 50'6 9'2 10'0 ARA Steel DS 4-5 R Dn Radial Steel 2 - 12' Cor Steel Dahlman 2 lvl
Bx-9 100000 40'6 8'7 8'7 ARA Steel DS 3-3 R Dn Radial Steel 1 -6' Cor Stl Dahlman 2 lvl
Bx-15 1910 R1930 70000 36'0 8'6 8'0 Stl Center+6TR DS DS Outside Flex Metal 1 -6' Wood Archbar


Nice find!

 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "'David Bott' dbott@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 11:57 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Santa Fe cars in 1934?

 
I believe there are Santa Fe historians and fans here.  Could you please help me further identify the following freight cars from a 1934 wheel report?  Photos of said cars as near to ’34 as possible (or notes on the lettering for that time period) would also be appreciated.
 
Road
No.
Contents
Destination
Tons
Notes
AT&SF
44428
Beans
Greensboro
91
36' DS box: Bx-W
AT&SF
48955
Hides
N Wilkesboro
45
36' DS box: Bx-X
AT&SF
64284
Furn
Strassburg
23
50' DS DD box: Fe-M
AT&SF
64700
Autos
N Wilkesboro
15
50' DS DD box: Fe-M
AT&SF
64752 !
Co Meal
N&W
5
50' DS DD box: Fe-Q
AT&SF
65411
Autos
Elkin
14
50' DS DD box: Fe-R
AT&SF
66122
Mty
Atlanta
0
?
AT&SF
122250
Mty
Meridian
0
‘24 ARA DS box: Bx-9
AT&SF
243885
Mf Tob
Inman Yds
7
36' DS box: Bx-15
 
 
 
Any help appreciated. 
 
Thanks,
 
Dave Bott



Re: ARA Standards - Stenciling Reporting Marks.

Eric Hansmann
 

Bob,

 

I replied to this on the 1941-1941 list earlier and several minutes ago, but Yahoo may be having issues. Here’s my response. My apologies for any repeated messages.

 

 

I highly recommend reading chapter 7 of Bob Karig’s “Coal Cars” book for insight on prototype freight car lettering. There is a wealth of information there that can affect how we letter our models for specific years in the early decades of the 20th century.

 

As I understand the situation as presented in Karig’s book, the ARA lettering guides were recommended practices, not true standards. They did become requirements but not until years after introduction. After USRA control ended, a new set of guidelines were approved. Sometime in early 1925, a change was made to alter the weight data. It had just been marked as Wt. and the new practice was to make this Lt. Wt. for the light weight of the car.

 

Change was in the air at that time as the ARA approved new recommended practices for car lettering in the spring of 1926 that seemed to take effect later in the year. The main change in these new lettering recommendations can be seen in the data presentation under the reporting marks. Load Limit is an added line while the cubic capacity is moved to the right end of the car side. Here’s a PDF file that illustrates the 1920 and the 1926 updates. Ignore the 1927 on the file. I created this when I thought the practices took effect in January 1927 but it was just a few months earlier.

http://hansmanns.org/ARA_lettering_guidelines_1920_+_1927.pdf

 

 

You can find builder images of new cars produced in 1925 and early 1926 with the earlier lettering style applied. And there are builder images of cars produced after mid-1926 that are wearing the updated lettering practices.

 

As per Karig, these 1926 guidelines did become required on all cars in interchange service on January 1, 1933. Even then, there were some roads that followed their own path. Use prototype photos to guide your work. I just completed a Westerfield D&RGW box car kit and the prototype data noted the road did not update the data presentation on their older cars until the late 1930s and early 1940s.

 

If you model the mid 1920s, there are many lettering nuances. Chapter 7 of the “Coal Cars” book offers the details needed as you make lettering decisions. While new guidelines were in place, it took years for railroads to update car lettering. Two million freight cars are not repainted and relettered overnight. Cars built in the 1920-1925 period may not have been repainted until the early 1930s so their original lettering would remain in place, with appropriate reweigh data updates. Here are some examples of older freight cars receiving some lettering upgrades as time marched onward.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/14/masking-tape-as-a-weathering-tool/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 


Re: ARA Standards - Stenciling Reporting Marks.

Eric Hansmann
 

Bob,

 

I replied to this on the 1941-1941 list earlier, but it has been lost to the ways of Yahoo. Here’s my response.

 

 

I highly recommend reading chapter 7 of Bob Karig’s “Coal Cars” book for insight on prototype freight car lettering. There is a wealth of information there that can affect how we letter our models for specific years in the early decades of the 20th century.

 

As I understand the situation as presented in Karig’s book, the ARA lettering guides were recommended practices, not true standards. They did become requirements but not until years after introduction. After USRA control ended, a new set of guidelines were approved. Sometime in early 1925, a change was made to alter the weight data. It had just been marked as Wt. and the new practice was to make this Lt. Wt. for the light weight of the car.

 

Change was in the air at that time as the ARA approved new recommended practices for car lettering in the spring of 1926 that seemed to take effect later in the year. The main change in these new lettering recommendations can be seen in the data presentation under the reporting marks. Load Limit is an added line while the cubic capacity is moved to the right end of the car side. Here’s a PDF file that illustrates the 1920 and the 1926 updates. Ignore the 1927 on the file. I created this when I thought the practices took effect in January 1927 but it was just a few months earlier.

http://hansmanns.org/ARA_lettering_guidelines_1920_+_1927.pdf

 

 

You can find builder images of new cars produced in 1925 and early 1926 with the earlier lettering style applied. And there are builder images of cars produced after mid-1926 that are wearing the updated lettering practices.

 

As per Karig, these 1926 guidelines did become required on all cars in interchange service on January 1, 1933. Even then, there were some roads that followed their own path. Use prototype photos to guide your work. I just completed a Westerfield D&RGW box car kit and the prototype data noted the road did not update the data presentation on their older cars until the late 1930s and early 1940s.

 

If you model the mid 1920s, there are many lettering nuances. Chapter 7 of the “Coal Cars” book offers the details needed as you make lettering decisions. While new guidelines were in place, it took years for railroads to update car lettering. Two million freight cars are not repainted and relettered overnight. Cars built in the 1920-1925 period may not have been repainted until the early 1930s so their original lettering would remain in place, with appropriate reweigh data updates. Here are some examples of older freight cars receiving some lettering upgrades as time marched onward.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/14/masking-tape-as-a-weathering-tool/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:06 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] ARA Standards - Stenciling Reporting Marks.

 




In 1920 the American Railroad Association issued standards for stenciling reporting marks. These possibly were standards recommended earlier by the Master Car Builders' Association.

 

Does anyone know what the standards actually said? Were they mandatory?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


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