Date   

Flat Car Load Pictures of International Bulldozers

twinstarcars
 

I am searching for pictures of International bulldozers loaded on flat cars. 

I need to know how far torn down the side arms and hydraulic assemblies are. 

How the blade is secured to the flatcar.

What is left attached.

Thanks in advance.


Ross Dando

Meridian, Idaho


Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I’d be concerned about squeezing the journal boxes “hard.”  The frames are flexible and you are doing more than just reaming out molding imperfections.   I do not think that even doing so you would end up with a consistent required axle length.

 

There is usually no easy, one-size fits all answer unless you keep changing the question until you get one.

 

To reduce variation, use the same manufacturer for all your truck side frames. It won’t eliminate variation, but it will reduce it.  If you only want one axle length, then only buy one truck type and throw out any that don’t meet your specs.

 

But if you want to have the correct trucks under your models, I think you’re going to need a variety of manufacturers and truck types.  That means variation in the axle length, even after reaming the side frames with the tool.

 

Choose your poison.

 

Dave Bott

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 6:10 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

 

 

Jeff and all,

When I use "The Tool" I hold the truck with the bearing
boxes of the axle I'm reaming between my fingers and
squeeze them - hard - as I turn the tool.
If I put the same wheelset back into the same truck
after reaming I can feel that the axle is a bit looser
than it was before in terms of end play.
Some trucks are even noticeably spread out by the tool
itself when you first put the tool in. After reaming some
of that spreading is gone.

My conclusion is that the axle distance between the
side frames does change due to the tool (in addition
to the conical hole also being smoothed out).

I use one of the original "Exxact Tools" and I turn it
in the truck at least 10 full turns per hole (4 times
= 40 full turns total).
And I -always- see some plastic shavings/turnings
that come out of the truck when I remove the tool.
From both ends and about the same amount of
shavings for each end/side of the truck.

****

Let me ask the question differently - if I know the
length of the tool (point to point) is there a recommended
amount of difference (decrease) for the probable optimum
axle that will "fit" that distance?
- Jim B.


Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

The original version of “The Tool” was developed by REBOXX. I know two of the former employees of REBOXX who were involved in its development. I can’t comment on other purveyor’s versions, but the original Tool was not a “reamer.” It was not designed to remove material from the cone to make it deeper, resulting in a longer axle length being required. It was developed because they found that many plastic trucks had (words fail me) “stuff” in the journals, little balls of plastic, flash, essentially manufacturing issues, and The Tool was designed to remove those things so as to have a clean conical journal for the tip of the axle to ride in.



Incidentally, wanting to use one standard axle length is really understandable, but REBOXX also found that even among the same truck from the same manufacturer, the best axle length (based on free rolling characteristics) would vary, sometimes even to the extent that the two axles in a single truck would benefit from different, albeit probably closely related, axle lengths. That is why they offered a large range of axle lengths.



Axles should not fit the truck without any lateral slop. There should be a small amount of wiggle laterally, but minimal. The reason is that the best relationship between the conical end of the axle and the cone in the journal is such that the very tip of the axle is riding well into but not all the way into the cone, so that the very tip of the axle is what’s riding on the cone. The angle of the axle end cone is tighter (smaller cone) than that of the journal.



Some have wondered what the benefit of replacing wheelsets for a better fit and rolling characteristics. The real benefit is that the pulling power of your locomotives will appear to be very much enhanced, because you can pull a longer train of cars with properly adjusted trucks.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 2:20 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?





Hi all,



This group seems to be the best that I'm a member of that can answer

this question - although it isn't directly related to steam era freight cars

it is related to using models of same. Moderator/owner please indulge.



===> Does any one have an axle length that they like to use for

trucks you have used "The Tool" on (the truck ream that

is used to improve the rolling characteristics of plastic

freight car trucks).



For instance - have you found that a .998 axle works best

after you've reamed your trucks? Some other size? Does

it still depend upon the specific truck?



I have been using truck reams for a long time. I'm going to

be replacing some (a lot?) of my wheelsets with Code 88

and would like to be able to purchase "mostly just one size".

- Jim B.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

Brian Carlson
 

Frankly, The easiest way to deal with this is to buy at least one package of several Rebox wheel sets. I find that every truck is different even sometimes from the same manufacture. I've even had some trucks that were so whacked that I had two different length axles in one truck. Normally I would try to replace a truck like that but sometimes they're the only game in town. I have a small parts box with drawers by each Rebox axle length. I also have used branchline or Intermountain axles and I just put them in the corresponding axle length drawer. If you buy a few at a time this isn't that expensive especially if you have a fleet of cars

Brian J. Carlson 

On Mar 29, 2017, at 6:09 PM, jimbetz jimbetz@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Jeff and all,

When I use "The Tool" I hold the truck with the bearing
boxes of the axle I'm reaming between my fingers and
squeeze them - hard - as I turn the tool.
If I put the same wheelset back into the same truck
after reaming I can feel that the axle is a bit looser
than it was before in terms of end play.
Some trucks are even noticeably spread out by the tool
itself when you first put the tool in. After reaming some
of that spreading is gone.

My conclusion is that the axle distance between the
side frames does change due to the tool (in addition
to the conical hole also being smoothed out).

I use one of the original "Exxact Tools" and I turn it
in the truck at least 10 full turns per hole (4 times
= 40 full turns total).
And I -always- see some plastic shavings/turnings
that come out of the truck when I remove the tool.
From both ends and about the same amount of
shavings for each end/side of the truck.

****

Let me ask the question differently - if I know the
length of the tool (point to point) is there a recommended
amount of difference (decrease) for the probable optimum
axle that will "fit" that distance?
- Jim B.


Caboose Cupola Roof Railings

Paul Hillman
 

I'm working on rebuilding an HO, Atlas, Magor caboose to a C&EI rebuilt type, with the different steps and a few other proper details. The cupola roof handrails were molded on & I removed them to put on wire handrails.


The cupola handrails appear in all photos that I've seen as a continuous railing, with no visible break or joining fitting. How did they make a continuous handrail ? It has to connect together somehow. Was it screwed together like a turn-buckle with left & right hand threads, or what ?


I've seen other road's cabooses also with continuous handrails, but no clues yet.


Thanks, Paul Hillman


USRA Composite Gons Cut Levers

Paul Hillman
 

I'm building some Intermountain USRA Composite Drop Bottom Gons. Nice kits, but there are no uncoupling cut levers in the kit or reference to them. I've searched for photos of the prototypes but found none showing them.

Anybody know about them?


Thanks, Paul Hillman

 


Re: If Dave Lehlbach is watching can you please. . .

Andy Cich
 

Bill,

 

The difference is in the end of the bolster, visible right above the truck. Look at the straight on, right side close-up photos for the Hooker and Diamond cars. You should spot the difference. The picture used for the unlettered cars is taken too far away to spot the difference, and may be the same photo.

 

Andy Cich

 

 

 

 

 

. . .explain the differences between the two painted but undecorated versions on the website?

 

Bill Welch


Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

Jim Betz
 

Jeff and all,

When I use "The Tool" I hold the truck with the bearing
boxes of the axle I'm reaming between my fingers and
squeeze them - hard - as I turn the tool.
If I put the same wheelset back into the same truck
after reaming I can feel that the axle is a bit looser
than it was before in terms of end play.
Some trucks are even noticeably spread out by the tool
itself when you first put the tool in. After reaming some
of that spreading is gone.

My conclusion is that the axle distance between the
side frames does change due to the tool (in addition
to the conical hole also being smoothed out).

I use one of the original "Exxact Tools" and I turn it
in the truck at least 10 full turns per hole (4 times
= 40 full turns total).
And I -always- see some plastic shavings/turnings
that come out of the truck when I remove the tool.
From both ends and about the same amount of
shavings for each end/side of the truck.

****

Let me ask the question differently - if I know the
length of the tool (point to point) is there a recommended
amount of difference (decrease) for the probable optimum
axle that will "fit" that distance?
- Jim B.


Re: NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

Ian Cranstone
 

Great pics.  Small correction, Canadian National Railways records show this car as being built in June 1908.  It would later be assigned CN 316672 in 1920, and was likely renumbered during the next few years.

Ian Cranstone

Osgoode, Ontario, Canada

lamontc@...

http://freightcars.nakina.net


On 2017-03-29, at 2:34 PM, Richard Brennan rbrennan@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

More box car photos on the ErieLack archive site...
part of the NPS Steamtown collection posted by Historian/Archivist
Pat (Richard) McKnight;

Today: Multiple views of CNR 45432,
a 36ft double-sheathed box car built by Rhodes & Curry at Amherst.
Nova Scotia, Jun 1903[?]
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1556.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1557.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1558.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1559.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1560.jpg

Daily index page at: http://lists.railfan.net/listthumb.cgi?erielack-03-29-17


If Dave Lehlbach is watching can you please. . .

Bill Welch
 

. . .explain the differences between the two painted but undecorated versions on the website?


Bill Welch


Re: Refrigerator Details

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <louisvwin@...> wrote :

Hi,


I am hand painting details and weathering some G gauge USA Trains refrigerator cars with wood sides and truss rods. One car, Oconto Brewing, came with a built date of 1930. That seems quite late for a truss rod type car. When were truss rod cars last commonly built? Was truss rod construction ever outlawed?

===================


Truss rods weren't "outlawed" per se, but steel sills were required that had sufficient strength to not buckle under the forces transmitted through the train. Since these new, stronger sills were sufficiently strong to keep the car from sagging, the truss rods became superfluous. Some cars kept their rods when rebuilt with steel sills during the twenties, and some very few cars were built new with both just after WWI.


==================

Another question; I have been painting the hinges on the icing hatches "old silver"  to represent hot dipped galvanized steel. Was that finish actually used on reefer icing hatch parts? Or was the steel just painted?

==================

Most door hardware was cast malleable iron, a material that holds up quite well on its own, and was not galvanized.

Dennis Storzek


Re: NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

Douglas Harding
 

And notice the chain around the axle in the firsts image, no doubt used to tow the car into the yard after the drawbar failed.

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 3:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

 

 

You'll notice the draft sills and drawbar are laying inside the car, visible through the open door.

Dennis Storzek


Re: NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <vasa0vasa@...> wrote :

Richard, thank you very much for sharing these really fine pictures.  I do like the 3rd picture featuring the wood piece added on the outside of the end of the car.

 

Gary Laakso

South of Mike Brock

 =====================


That's the buffer block, the predecessor to the striker casting. It's purpose was to catch the coupler horn and transmit the buffing forces to the car frame if the coupler was hit so hard that the draft gear was completely compressed. As you can see, the one on the other end didn't work, and the draft gear tore the draft sills completely off the car.


Dennis Storzek


Re: NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

Dennis Storzek
 

You'll notice the draft sills and drawbar are laying inside the car, visible through the open door.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

Douglas Harding
 

Jim I’ve been using the tool for years, and I have used Intermountain metal wheel sets since they came out. While axle lengths have been discussed at length, in my experience I have found it is not an issue in the major of the HO trucks I use. And for the few it is a problem, usually a better truck is available. Yes some slop back and forth a bit, but that adds to the character of the car, but does not add to rollability issues.

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 1:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

 

 

It’s truck-dependent.  See http://www.reboxx.com/Documents/Wheelsets/33%20Application%20Chart.pdf .

 

I don’t think The Tool changes the required axle length enough to require a different size.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:20 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

 

 

Hi all,

 

  This group seems to be the best that I'm a member of that can answer

this question - although it isn't directly related to steam era freight cars

it is related to using models of same.  Moderator/owner please indulge.

 

  ===> Does any one have an axle length that they like to use for

           trucks you have used "The Tool" on (the truck ream that

           is used to improve the rolling characteristics of plastic

           freight car trucks).

 

  For instance - have you found that a .998 axle works best

after you've reamed your trucks?  Some other size?  Does

it still depend upon the specific truck?

 

  I have been using truck reams for a long time.  I'm going to

be replacing some (a lot?) of my wheelsets with Code 88

and would like to be able to purchase "mostly just one size".

                                                                                  - Jim B.


Re: NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

gary laakso
 

Richard, thank you very much for sharing these really fine pictures.  I do like the 3rd picture featuring the wood piece added on the outside of the end of the car.

 

Gary Laakso

South of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 2:34 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

 

 

More box car photos on the ErieLack archive site...
part of the NPS Steamtown collection posted by Historian/Archivist
Pat (Richard) McKnight;

Today: Multiple views of CNR 45432,
a 36ft double-sheathed box car built by Rhodes & Curry at Amherst.
Nova Scotia, Jun 1903[?]
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1556.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1557.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1558.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1559.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1560.jpg

Daily index page at: http://lists.railfan.net/listthumb.cgi?erielack-03-29-17

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


NPS photos: Canadian National CNR - double-sheathed box car

Richard Brennan
 

More box car photos on the ErieLack archive site...
part of the NPS Steamtown collection posted by Historian/Archivist Pat (Richard) McKnight;

Today: Multiple views of CNR 45432,
a 36ft double-sheathed box car built by Rhodes & Curry at Amherst. Nova Scotia, Jun 1903[?]
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1556.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1557.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1558.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1559.jpg
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-29-17/X1560.jpg

Daily index page at: http://lists.railfan.net/listthumb.cgi?erielack-03-29-17


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

Aley, Jeff A
 

It’s truck-dependent.  See http://www.reboxx.com/Documents/Wheelsets/33%20Application%20Chart.pdf .

 

I don’t think The Tool changes the required axle length enough to require a different size.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:20 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

 

 

Hi all,

 

  This group seems to be the best that I'm a member of that can answer

this question - although it isn't directly related to steam era freight cars

it is related to using models of same.  Moderator/owner please indulge.

 

  ===> Does any one have an axle length that they like to use for

           trucks you have used "The Tool" on (the truck ream that

           is used to improve the rolling characteristics of plastic

           freight car trucks).

 

  For instance - have you found that a .998 axle works best

after you've reamed your trucks?  Some other size?  Does

it still depend upon the specific truck?

 

  I have been using truck reams for a long time.  I'm going to

be replacing some (a lot?) of my wheelsets with Code 88

and would like to be able to purchase "mostly just one size".

                                                                                  - Jim B.


Using "The Tool" (truck ream)?

Jim Betz
 

Hi all,


  This group seems to be the best that I'm a member of that can answer

this question - although it isn't directly related to steam era freight cars

it is related to using models of same.  Moderator/owner please indulge.


  ===> Does any one have an axle length that they like to use for

           trucks you have used "The Tool" on (the truck ream that

           is used to improve the rolling characteristics of plastic

           freight car trucks).


  For instance - have you found that a .998 axle works best

after you've reamed your trucks?  Some other size?  Does

it still depend upon the specific truck?


  I have been using truck reams for a long time.  I'm going to

be replacing some (a lot?) of my wheelsets with Code 88

and would like to be able to purchase "mostly just one size".

                                                                                  - Jim B.


Re: Refrigerator Details

Tony Thompson
 

Another question; I have been painting the hinges on the icing hatches "old silver"  to represent hot dipped galvanized steel. Was that finish actually used on reefer icing hatch parts? Or was the steel just painted?


     For many years, iron parts on reefers were painted black. I would doubt any were unpainted.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





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