Date   

Also One Of The Last Shipments To Cuba

thecitrusbelt@...
 

OK, last photo link from the Chicago and North Western Railway Archives Art Collections.

 

The sign on the reefer proclaims this is the first export shipment of seed potatoes to Cuba. The caption dates the photo as 1959. I'll bet it also was one of the last export shipments of seed potatoes to Cuba.


https://pixels.com/featured/historic-seed-potato-export-to-cuba-1959-chicago-and-north-western-historical-society.html

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


REA Express Reefer In Freight Train

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This is another photo link from the Chicago and North Western Railway Archives Art Collections.

 

It shows an REA express reefer mixed in with non-express reefers. Assuming this express reefer was loaded, how often would such reefers appear in freight trains rather than in passenger trains?

 

https://pixels.com/featured/freight-train-crosses-high-bridge-1959-chicago-and-north-western-historical-society.html

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Running Boards Replacements (Sorry, No Ladder Talk In This Post)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This photo link is from the Chicago and North Western Railway Archives Art Collections.

 

It shows running boards that have been replaced over time. I'm sure it has been noted here previously but this would be a good detail to model.

 

https://pixels.com/featured/freight-train-headed-away-from-navy-pier-chicago-and-north-western-historical-society.html

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

John Barry
 

Extra STYLE points for using STILES?
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, April 6, 2017 3:08 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 
Yeah, sure, but there IS a difference between stiles and styles. That was my main point.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 11:57 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....

Tom Madden

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

gary laakso
 

Perhaps, it needs a “don’t tread on me” sticker attached to it.

 

Gary Laakso

south of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 6, 2017 2:36 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 

 

It’s still early in 2017 but I have no reservations about nominating Tom’s post as The Post of the Year.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 8:57 AM
To:
STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 

 

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....

Tom Madden





Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Yeah, sure, but there IS a difference between stiles and styles. That was my main point.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 11:57 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia





And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....



Tom Madden


Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Dave Nelson
 

It’s still early in 2017 but I have no reservations about nominating Tom’s post as The Post of the Year.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 8:57 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 

 

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....

Tom Madden




Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Jeff Coleman
 

The FRA also refers ladders as stiles and treads made of wood, iron or steel.

Jeff Coleman


On Apr 6, 2017 12:47 PM, "rwitt_2000@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

The 1912 CBD has the following definitions:

Ladder Round: A round cross bar or step of a ladder.

Ladder Side Rails: The vertical side pieces to which the ladders rounds are attached.

In the definition of a ladder it states that "The individual bars, whether of wood or iron, and whether round or square, are termed ladder rounds."

Bob Witt



Re: A NEW EPIPHANY ON YARMOUTH LADDERS

Bill Vaughn
 

Thanks for the suggestion, I have many to bend but have had little success.  Hopefully will have time to try soon.

Bill Vaughn


On Wednesday, April 5, 2017 2:01 PM, "WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 

I have been a big fan of Pierre's ladders since they came out. At first (like many) I had some difficulty executing the bends. With practice I mastered this procedure. Properly placing the styles in the bending machine has also proven to be a challenge. Recently I am using Pierre's styles to improve the appearance of the ends of some USRA box cars.
I use the bent style over the cast on style on the outboard side. I shear off half of the style for the inner part. I use the bending tol for this clamping ithe half with the holes inboard and using the Micor Mark small saw to shear off the outer half.

This morning I learned that placing toe etching in the tool was easier if I did not remove it from the overall fret. You guys probably knew this all the time but kept this to yourself.

Sometmes a simple solution makes life so much easier

Bill Pardie



Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

rwitt_2000
 

The 1912 CBD has the following definitions:

Ladder Round: A round cross bar or step of a ladder.

Ladder Side Rails: The vertical side pieces to which the ladders rounds are attached.

In the definition of a ladder it states that "The individual bars, whether of wood or iron, and whether round or square, are termed ladder rounds."

Bob Witt


Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Tom Madden
 

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....


Tom Madden


Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Dave Parker
 

FWIW, there is an American Ladder Institute.  They only seem to use the term (side) rail.  I did not see stringer or stile in their list of recognized terms.




Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Thursday, April 6, 2017 7:51 AM, "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Dennis opines:

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Well, yes, that’s correct about DOORS, but we’re talking about ladders. But I do agree about using stiles for the vertical parts of a ladder. And ladders have rungs.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:26 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

---In STMFC@..., wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles. That’s not what they are called. The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

Schuyler

============

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Dennis Storzek

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Jeff Coleman
 

AAR Field Manual
Rule 79
Lists Ladder Treads.
Ladders complete, includes two side rails or stiles and treads.

Rule 83
Qualifer PE, Ladder Tread
Qualifer PD, Ladder Stile Bracket

Jeff Coleman


On Apr 6, 2017 10:55 AM, "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Dennis opines:

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Well, yes, that’s correct about DOORS, but we’re talking about ladders. But I do agree about using stiles for the vertical parts of a ladder. And ladders have rungs.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:26 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

---In STMFC@..., wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles. That’s not what they are called. The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

Schuyler

============

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Dennis Storzek

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Canada Southern Brake Wheel

Gary Wildung
 

Building a Westerfield Canada Southern box car for the 1950 time frame and can not find  any information on the right type brake wheel. Thanks for any information to help on this.

Gary


Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Dennis opines:

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Well, yes, that’s correct about DOORS, but we’re talking about ladders. But I do agree about using stiles for the vertical parts of a ladder. And ladders have rungs.





Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:26 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia









---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).



Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles. That’s not what they are called. The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.



The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”



Schuyler

============



I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.



Dennis Storzek







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

 

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles.  That’s not what they are called.  The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

 

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

 

Schuyler

============


I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.


Dennis Storzek

 


Re: new Speedwitch reefer book

Paul Doggett <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Yes i got mine yesterday a superb publication.

On Thu, 6 Apr 2017 at 3:10, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]
wrote:
 

     Just got mine today. I echo everyone's praise, it's a terrific resource. And thanks for the better paper, Ted. 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

Greg Martin
 

Schuyler/
 
 
They will let you go in and edit it. I agree I have never heard them called stringers and actually I have only ever heard them called stiles.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 4/5/2017 3:34:37 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles.  That’s not what they are called.  The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

Schuyler


Re: new Speedwitch reefer book

Tony Thompson
 

     Just got mine today. I echo everyone's praise, it's a terrific resource. And thanks for the better paper, Ted. 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Solid Bearings vs. Roller Bearings

Tony Thompson
 

Todd Horton wrote:

 
Here's a video (may be old news to some) about grain elevators in Canada.  The guy working the elevator is able to start moving, what appears to be plain bearing trucks under a box car, with the help of a lever and then push it into place by hand.   Even after the car is loaded he still is capable of moving the car by hand. 

      I have seen video of  the same done with plain bearings, moving the car a couple of inches with a pry bar, then further rolling by hand.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





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