Date   

Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Louie B. Hydrick
 

 
 
Greetings,

Suggest you try Harbor Freight, they had several regulators in the lower ranges to choose from, they also do web order.

Louie B. Hydrick
Associate Broker
RE/MAX Partners
4316 Washington Road
Evans GA 30809-3957

706-832-6263 Mobile
706-922-7355 Office
706-922-7356 Fax
706-922-7368 Direct

GA Lic. 207874 SC Lic. 14865

Or visit me on the web at:
www.csrahomesandland.com
or
www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

frograbbit602
 

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator. My bottle is only five pound so I have to exchange it or have it filled more often than your twenty pound.  The places I have it filled ( in MN Toll or Minneapolis Oxygen ) both sell various regulators ( I have  0 to 60 ) and can replace the one you have with another.  I am sure your CO2  suppliers can do the same.
Lester Breuer


Re: Mystery car

mwbauers
 

Thanks, thats a very interesting shot........

While your find has Andrews RB trucks, the HCMX still had friction bearing Barbers S2 ..... If I remember correctly the shots I was reviewing several hours ago on the other computer.

[I really want to put up a central server for this house and have everything together]

Best to ya...
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi, USA



On Apr 24, 2017, at 1:13 PM, Tim O'Connor  wrote:


Yep. I took many photos of a nearly identical ex-NYC car sitting in the
"relic collection" in Utica, New York ~14-15 years ago.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timboconnor/34089410612/

Tim O'Connor


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


Dennis those all appear to be significantly different looking rebuilds than
this car - and I could be wrong but they all appear to be 36 foot cars! (I know
the web site says they are 40 feet long but they sure don't look like it to me.
Maybe an optical illusion because the doors aren't as tall?)
=======================

Tim, I think you are correct. The original car in question has ten roof panels, plus the two panels with the hatches. The cars at IRM have nine plus two. By this time everyone's roof panels seem to have standardized at 41" wide (IIRC) and a few inches difference in each corner panel would make up the other seven or so inches. Sorry if I led anyone astray.

Dennis Storzek


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

rwitt_2000
 

I agree with Tim these cars, URTX 66219, 66221, 66234, and 66244, look shorter and appear to resembled those in the 15000 series and originally built for Swift per Roger's post.

Bob Witt


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Charles Peck
 

Andy, if you get in contact with an industrial gas distributor they should be able to modify your regulator
to better suit your needs. Replacing the 0-300 gauge with one reading 0-60 or 0-100 should help
quite a bit.  Most gas distributors either repair and maintain regulators or have contact with some firm
that does do that work.
Regards,
Chuck Peck in FL 

On Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 8:17 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi-
Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.

I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.

I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.

My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

You should be able to simply replace the 0-300 psi pressure gauge with a 0-50 psi gauge or something similar. You just need to take the current gauge to the hardware store and add any fittings needed to mate the new gauge to the existing connection. I’m guessing that the only potential problem is to not open the 2nd regulator too far that you exceed the capacity of the pressure gauge.



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, April 24, 2017 5:18 PM
To: STMFC YahooGroup
Subject: [STMFC] Pressure regulators for airbrushing








Hi-

Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.



I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.



I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.



My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.



Thanks,

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?

 

This is a tough one. All the choices made would be welcome to us modelers. I would probably go with an Rr-56 just because of the number built compared to the others.

Rich Christie

ps - I too have seen them in MOW colors. There was a pair used as buffer cars for a welded rail train traveling over Tehachapi back in the 80s. They would remove the roof and fill them with rebar, then reattach the roof.


On Monday, April 24, 2017 2:39 PM, "Charles Slater atsfcondr42@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Bob some of the Rr-56 cars went into M of W service also, I forgot to mention that on my last E-mail. Also I have many photos of these cars. 
Charlie Slater 

Sent from Outlook



From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 6:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?
 
 
I have a friend who is in the product development group at a major model manufacture. For many years I have been asking him (Read: begging) for a first generation mechanical refrigerator car.
 
This week he finally asked me what I would propose for an HO scale model (and possibly one in N scale as well). My personal preference is an Rr-56, however, I only speak for myself.
 
If you were to propose that a manufacturer invest in the tooling and production of a first generation Santa Fe mechanical refrigerator car, which class would you suggest?
 
Keep in mind, a manufacturer wants to be able to produce cars that would sell based on the number of prototypes built, paint scheme variations and re-numberings that would allow for multiple production runs over the years.
 
In the case of mechanical reefers, later conversions to insulated boxcars and MOW service also are positive factors.
 
So, what are your candidate mechanical reefers (Santa Fe ONLY) and why? And I assume most everyone on this group wants separately applied details or a design that makes such upgrades relatively easy.
 
Thanks.
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Re: Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?

Bill Vaughn
 

The Rr-56 would be a great car and so would the Rr-69

Bill Vaughn



On Monday, April 24, 2017 12:39 PM, "Charles Slater atsfcondr42@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Bob some of the Rr-56 cars went into M of W service also, I forgot to mention that on my last E-mail. Also I have many photos of these cars. 
Charlie Slater 

Sent from Outlook



From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 6:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?
 
 
I have a friend who is in the product development group at a major model manufacture. For many years I have been asking him (Read: begging) for a first generation mechanical refrigerator car.
 
This week he finally asked me what I would propose for an HO scale model (and possibly one in N scale as well). My personal preference is an Rr-56, however, I only speak for myself.
 
If you were to propose that a manufacturer invest in the tooling and production of a first generation Santa Fe mechanical refrigerator car, which class would you suggest?
 
Keep in mind, a manufacturer wants to be able to produce cars that would sell based on the number of prototypes built, paint scheme variations and re-numberings that would allow for multiple production runs over the years.
 
In the case of mechanical reefers, later conversions to insulated boxcars and MOW service also are positive factors.
 
So, what are your candidate mechanical reefers (Santa Fe ONLY) and why? And I assume most everyone on this group wants separately applied details or a design that makes such upgrades relatively easy.
 
Thanks.
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Re: Coal Country RPM: April 20-21, 2018

Michael Gross
 

Guess they have to start in what most think of as "coal country," but appreciate Tony's comment as regards Illinois, as I was always fascinated by Coal City on the AT&SF's Illinois Division.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA
--
Michael Gross
Facebook.com/ActorMichaelGross
Twitter.com/MichaelGrossBiz
Instagram:  ActorMichaelGross
Kerner Management Associates


Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Andy Carlson
 

Hi-
Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.

I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.

I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.

My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

ROGER HINMAN
 

There were two different types of cars built by GA in 1954. A fairly large order of 15000 series cars for Swift which were meant to replace the little red wooden cars and had a similar IL of 29" and change. There was a smaller lot of forty foot plus cars built for URTX with plug doors. Almost all of the post WW2 GA cars I have seen at museums have had the tabbed side sills replaced with a full length side sill. 

Roger Hinman


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Apr 24, 2017 2:37 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

 

Dennis those all appear to be significantly different looking rebuilds than
this car - and I could be wrong but they all appear to be 36 foot cars! (I know
the web site says they are 40 feet long but they sure don't look like it to me.
Maybe an optical illusion because the doors aren't as tall?)

I sent Bob Witt a photo of URTX 63648, a Dubuque meat reefer that appears to
be identical to URTX 67806 except that 63648 has side sill tabs. The draft gear
on both cars appears to extend out from the end sill - just as it would on any
car with a Duryea underframe.

Tim O'




I looked in the photos I have for a similar URTX reefers and cannot find any. Reefer similar to this one were probably built new in the 1950s with 3-3 dart naught ends and horizontal side seams and Duryea underframes and poorly modeled by Walthers ~20 years ago. However, URTX 67806 doesn't appear to have a Duryea underframe.
====================

The Illinois Railway Museum has these cars on the property: URTX 66219, 66221, 66234, and 66244, all of which appear to match the car we are talking about. Their roster claims they were built bu General American in 1954. Some still show visages of the Oscar Meyer logo. These cars are not part of the collection, but were acquired as parts storage space. More info here:

http://www.irm.org/roster/freight.html

Dennis Storzek


http://www.railgiants.org/images/explore/ice%20cooled/001.jpg


Re: Hinges - Swift Refrigerator Cars

ROGER HINMAN
 

This was a General American design from 1934 that they first used on the URTX 89000 series refrigerators. They were used off and on in General American designs for the next couple of decades.

Roger Hinman



-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Apr 24, 2017 4:07 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Hinges - Swift Refrigerator Cars

 
I noticed that the three Swift swing door ice bunker refrigerator cars in the Illinois Railway Museum's collection all have two hinges per door. Here are the cars:
 
 
 
 
Most refrigerator cars I have seen have three hinges with very few having only two. Was this something particular to one or two car builders or was this simply something specified by the owner?
 
Thanks.
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Hinges - Swift Refrigerator Cars

thecitrusbelt@...
 

I noticed that the three Swift swing door ice bunker refrigerator cars in the Illinois Railway Museum's collection all have two hinges per door. Here are the cars:

 

http://www.irm.org/gallery/SRLX15030

 

http://www.irm.org/gallery/SRLX15802

 

http://www.irm.org/gallery/SRLX15833

 

Most refrigerator cars I have seen have three hinges with very few having only two. Was this something particular to one or two car builders or was this simply something specified by the owner?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?

charles slater
 

Bob some of the Rr-56 cars went into M of W service also, I forgot to mention that on my last E-mail. Also I have many photos of these cars. 

Charlie Slater 


Sent from Outlook




From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 6:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?
 
 

I have a friend who is in the product development group at a major model manufacture. For many years I have been asking him (Read: begging) for a first generation mechanical refrigerator car.

 

This week he finally asked me what I would propose for an HO scale model (and possibly one in N scale as well). My personal preference is an Rr-56, however, I only speak for myself.

 

If you were to propose that a manufacturer invest in the tooling and production of a first generation Santa Fe mechanical refrigerator car, which class would you suggest?

 

Keep in mind, a manufacturer wants to be able to produce cars that would sell based on the number of prototypes built, paint scheme variations and re-numberings that would allow for multiple production runs over the years.

 

In the case of mechanical reefers, later conversions to insulated boxcars and MOW service also are positive factors.

 

So, what are your candidate mechanical reefers (Santa Fe ONLY) and why? And I assume most everyone on this group wants separately applied details or a design that makes such upgrades relatively easy.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

Tim O'Connor
 


Dennis those all appear to be significantly different looking rebuilds than
this car - and I could be wrong but they all appear to be 36 foot cars! (I know
the web site says they are 40 feet long but they sure don't look like it to me.
Maybe an optical illusion because the doors aren't as tall?)

I sent Bob Witt a photo of URTX 63648, a Dubuque meat reefer that appears to
be identical to URTX 67806 except that 63648 has side sill tabs. The draft gear
on both cars appears to extend out from the end sill - just as it would on any
car with a Duryea underframe.

Tim O'




I looked in the photos I have for a similar URTX reefers and cannot find any. Reefer similar to this one were probably built new in the 1950s with 3-3 dart naught ends and horizontal side seams and Duryea underframes and poorly modeled by Walthers ~20 years ago. However, URTX 67806 doesn't appear to have a Duryea underframe.
====================

The Illinois Railway Museum has these cars on the property: URTX 66219, 66221, 66234, and 66244, all of which appear to match the car we are talking about. Their roster claims they were built bu General American in 1954. Some still show visages of the Oscar Meyer logo. These cars are not part of the collection, but were acquired as parts storage space. More info here:

http://www.irm.org/roster/freight.html

Dennis Storzek


http://www.railgiants.org/images/explore/ice%20cooled/001.jpg


Re: Mystery car

Tim O'Connor
 


Yep. I took many photos of a nearly identical ex-NYC car sitting in the
"relic collection" in Utica, New York ~14-15 years ago.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timboconnor/34089410612/

Tim O'Connor




Ya know, it's helpful to post an image or a link� and the funning thinng is, GOOGLE found it right away:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/419/19787279323_941656a809_b.jpg

That looks like a GSC 90 ton flat, similar to those used by the NH, NYC, SOUTHERN and  a number of other roads.

Regards

Bruce F. Smith           




Can someone look up the original RR that owned the about 36-foot cast drop bottom flatcar that spent its last years as HCMX-4403 in the Harnischfeger Milwaukee plant??

It was scrapped a few years ago and looked like it was maybe pre-war era.

I got lots of pictures of her with repair plates and a flood of cut off load supports on her. The weathering from that is a mind blower.

Harnischfeger must have used her for many years to ship the larger sections of their mining shovels to the customer.

I suspect it to be post WW-1 of one of the local RR's. The corporation is just to the south of the main Milwaukee Road shops and the CNW runs through the middle of the property.

Mike Bauers


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <rwitt_2000@...> wrote :

I looked in the photos I have for a similar URTX reefers and cannot find any. Reefer similar to this one were probably built new in the 1950s with 3-3 dart naught ends and horizontal side seams and Duryea underframes and poorly modeled by Walthers ~20 years ago. However, URTX 67806 doesn't appear to have a Duryea underframe.
====================

The Illinois Railway Museum has these cars on the property: URTX 66219, 66221, 66234, and 66244, all of which appear to match the car we are talking about. Their roster claims they were built bu General American in 1954. Some still show visages of the Oscar Meyer logo. These cars are not part of the collection, but were acquired as parts storage space. More info here:


Dennis Storzek


Re: What Class Boxcar Was This UP Caboose Converted From?

Allen Montgomery <sandbear75@...>
 

Jeff,
You forgot about the high prices that the life guard union was charging in those days.
Allen


On Monday, April 24, 2017 9:38 AM, "'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Jack,
 
                You wrote, “I kinda figured that the reason for this conversion was that with the beginning of pool cabooses, the large auto car body was needed to provide room for the pool table. < grinning and ducking>”
 
Actually                , that’s the wrong kind of “pool”.  UP did experiment with Pool cabooses converted from tank cars.  They scrapped the cars after several injuries caused by crews fitting unauthorized diving boards.
 
Regards,
 
-Jeff
 
(Only 23 days too late for April Fool’s Day).
 
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 2:53 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What Class Boxcar Was This UP Caboose Converted From?
 
 
It's not uncommon for boxcars that are converted to cabooses or MOW camp cars to have some of the side truss members removed or severed to accommodate windows. The new use doesn't require anything near the original load capacity, indeed it's much like an empty boxcar. But notice also that the severed ends of the diagonals terminate at new horizontal structural members: a Z above the window, and an angle below the window sill. These are connected to the posts on either side of the window, and this revised framing restores some of the lost shear strength. 
 
I kinda figured that the reason for this conversion was that with the beginning of pool cabooses, the large auto car body was needed to provide room for the pool table. < grinning and ducking>
 
Jack Mullen



Re: What Class Boxcar Was This UP Caboose Converted From?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Jack,

 

                You wrote, “I kinda figured that the reason for this conversion was that with the beginning of pool cabooses, the large auto car body was needed to provide room for the pool table. < grinning and ducking>”

 

Actually                , that’s the wrong kind of “pool”.  UP did experiment with Pool cabooses converted from tank cars.  They scrapped the cars after several injuries caused by crews fitting unauthorized diving boards.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

(Only 23 days too late for April Fool’s Day).

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 2:53 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What Class Boxcar Was This UP Caboose Converted From?

 

 

It's not uncommon for boxcars that are converted to cabooses or MOW camp cars to have some of the side truss members removed or severed to accommodate windows. The new use doesn't require anything near the original load capacity, indeed it's much like an empty boxcar. But notice also that the severed ends of the diagonals terminate at new horizontal structural members: a Z above the window, and an angle below the window sill. These are connected to the posts on either side of the window, and this revised framing restores some of the lost shear strength. 

 

I kinda figured that the reason for this conversion was that with the beginning of pool cabooses, the large auto car body was needed to provide room for the pool table. < grinning and ducking>

 

Jack Mullen

46381 - 46400 of 195450