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Re: Table Saw

qmp211
 

The Dremel 580 Table Saw Blades & Accessory Replacements

Ed & Others,

The Dremel saws are readily available used on ebay.

Slotting saws - ground round, flat and no set. As a result, you can push them too hard and overheat them. Common sense applies. These are precision tools, not framing blades for a chop saw. 
4" slotting saw, .025", 300 tooth blade
4" slotting saw, .032", 220 tooth blade

Carbide blade - the only one I have personal experience still available is the Japanese manufactured 4" 40 tooth carbide blade from Micro-Mark. Be wary of cheap blades, carbide blades can throw the carbide tips, the cheaper the quicker.
http://www.micromark.com/40-Tooth-Saw-Blade-4-Inch-Dia-1-2-Inch-Hole

Aftermarket manufacturers now offer great accessories for the Dremel saw. Originally, I improved the original miter gauge by adding a Lexan fence and added a piece of molding to the fence. I clamp the fence at the rear of the table with a "C" clamp. All of this was after using a dial indicator, machinist square and steel rule to align the blade perpendicular to the table top and then aligning the blade/arbor/motor assembly perpendicular to the miter gauge slots, IF you can. You need to check that the fence is parallel to the blade infeed and outfeed. I run the saw most often close to max height. 80% of what I normally cut is a 90 so my machinist square gets used for every set-up. 

You will find 2 ebay sellers that offer Dremel saw replacement accessories.
aclrails1965 offers fence, miter gauge, sled and backplate with dust collection. Fence and miter gauge are nice stuff. 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/aclrails1965/m.html?item=252900782796&hash=item3ae20fb2cc%3Am%3Am18DMfN-8PCCfRd1-lx4vNg&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

back plate with dust collection
http://www.ebay.com/itm/DREMEL-580-TABLE-SAW-BACK-DUST-PLATE-W-BLADE-LOCK-/252900782796?hash=item3ae20fb2cc:m:m18DMfN-8PCCfRd1-lx4vNg

adjustable rip fence
http://www.ebay.com/itm/DREMEL-580-TABLE-SAW-CUSTOM-MADE-POLISHED-ALUM-ADJ-RIP-FENCE-NICE-ITEM-/262956145424?hash=item3d39685b10:g:hUkAAOSw2xRYUsjs

replacement aluminum throat plate blanks are no longer available
use styrene to make your own filler for the Dremel throat plate. Don't be afraid to flatten the original throat plate high spots with a hammer. Dremel's punch press quality wasn't so hot.

Speed control - about 1/3 - 1/2 speed, depends on material and thickness
Dremel model 219 or any other universal motor speed controller. A good dimmer switch will work.

Watch some youtube table saw tuneup videos or get a tablesaw tuneup book. You can apply most techniques to the Dremel saw.

Some might opine that after spending all this money why not spend more and buy a Byrnes?  The Byrnes is a very nice saw. The Dremel will cut thicker material. You decide, what are my goals? I am very fortunate to have the Dremel, Micro-Mark tilt arbor and the Byrnes, the last 2 bought used off ebay after selling some never-to-be-used kits. I use the Dremel the most. Don't know why, just do.

This will get you started.

Randy Danniel







Re: Table Saw

qmp211
 

Ed,

I'm confused, I'm old.....

Hobby mill or larger?

Use a boxcar with roof, no floor as an example.

How is it clamped to the mill table?

Are you following a path up one side, across the roof and down the other? Or what?

How do you prevent the car sides from flappin' in the wind like a plastic banshee?

Thanks.

Randy Danniel


BLI Tank cars

hubert mask
 

For those that are looking for BLI tank cars.  Visit my web site at maskislanddecals.com  scroll to the bottom of the page under product categories, Broad Way Limited Imports.  I have 3 four packs left priced right and includes shipping.


Hubert Mask


Mask Island Decals inc.


Re: BLI 6k tank cars

spsalso
 

I surely wouldn't mind buying some Hooker-Tacoma cars.  If they existed.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: BLI 6k tank cars

Tim O'Connor
 


It's good they sold out so fast, because that probably guarantees future releases.
Hopefully the next run will have paint schemes for people who model after 1950 ...
... and 1960 ...

Tim O'





Sorry, John.  They are gone and I checked with BLI the run is sold out.

Rich


Re: BLI 6k tank cars

SUVCWORR@...
 

Mea culpa for the reply to the whole list

Rich Orr


-----Original Message-----
From: SUVCWORR@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Apr 29, 2017 2:39 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: BLI 6k tank cars



Sorry, John.  They are gone and I checked with BLI the run is sold out.

Rich


-----Original Message-----
From: golden1014@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sat, Apr 29, 2017 2:34 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: BLI 6k tank cars



Hi Rich, got any of those cars left?  John Golden




Re: BLI 6k tank cars

SUVCWORR@...
 

Sorry, John.  They are gone and I checked with BLI the run is sold out.

Rich


-----Original Message-----
From: golden1014@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Apr 29, 2017 2:34 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: BLI 6k tank cars



Hi Rich, got any of those cars left?  John Golden


Re: Warren Tank Cars In-train in 1954

Tim O'Connor
 


Bill and everyone, FYI, you can see from the URL Bill posted that the photos
are all actually HOSTED on Flickr (owned by Yahoo, now part of Verizon)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/28005007790/

Also, downloading them is trivial if you use Firefox (in spite of the "disabled"
notices from the web sites). Rule #1 on web photos - if you can see them, then you
can download them.

Tim O'Connor







Re: Table Saw

spsalso
 

Randy,

I have not milled resin; I have milled styrene.

I typically use a 1/8" diameter 3x (length--3/8") cutter.  Mostly because it's common and convenient (two handwheel revolutions give a nice overlap when cutting on the vertical).  Of course, I have many other cutters for specific uses.  Right now, I'm using 4 flute.    I don't see much difference when working with either a 4 or a 2; but I'm not doing production work, so I'm not pushing things at all.

Spindle speed--I don't know.  I don't have a tachometer, though I do believe I'll get one, now that I think on it.  I don't much care, as long as things work.  I will say, though, that the cutter is spinning briskly. 

My feeds for styrene tend to be in the .01-.02 range.  When I've pushed that by much, melting starts.  Again, since it's not production work, I just take baby steps.

My general setup for doing something like a typical one-piece house car casting in HO:

Do a rough cut and discard the excess piece, or save for later.
Clamp down on table--piece running parallel with table--use spacers underneath for clearance--add an internal spacer/spreader at the "open" end of the work (either glued in or clamped)--affirm that the piece is adequately square with the table

For a cutter I recommend a 1/4" 10x cutter with stub flutes.  In particular, a Harvey Tool PN 982216-C3. 

How I enter and exit the work is in the horizontal mode.

One could also mount the work vertically on an angle plate.  Then "any old cutter" could be used.  

As I think I mentioned before, the work is time consuming.  But the mill is my favorite machine.  And, as I also said, nothing can go wrong if the worker does his part.



I've shown you mine, Randy.  Let's see yours.  I suspect more folks out there will want to go the saw route, so detailed information on your methods will be even more important to the group.

How do you do this kind of thing with a small table saw:  what blade diameter, what speed, what tooth count?
And, in particular, how do you do the setup so that the cut is both square with the work and consistent across it?  And how do you assure yourself the blade won't grab?  Do you use a sled or a moving table?  And, since your recommended table saw is out of production and may be difficult to find, what saw that is readily available would you recommend?

I use various wood saws, both table and miter, and I would not mind finding something that would match the perfection of the mill but get the job done faster.  I love using the mill, but I must confess that, if I wanted to batch out a dozen cars, I would get THOROUGHLY bored.  So I am looking forward to new information on using saws for things like this.

And, also, thanks in advance for sharing.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Warren Tank Cars In-train in 1954

richard glueck
 

The steam alone makes this worthwhile viewing, but then ALCO PA's and FA's in a variety of road schemes.  Wow!  What a historical bonanza!

R. Glueck


Warren Tank Cars In-train in 1954

Bill Welch
 


IC & Southern Yard Shot very much in Transition

Bill Welch
 


Re: New Accurail 36-foot box cars

hayden_tom@...
 

Eric,


Thanks for the review. These cars are just on the edge of my era, but looked so neat I bought the NKP one. I cannot figure out how you were able to attach the small styrene strips to the roofwalk ends, or the brake platform. So I used 0.010" x 0.018 brass stock, drilled holes for one end into the body and applied CA from inside. Actually I used 0.015" brass wire I flattened, but if I were doing several I would get the flat stock.


Tom Hayden


Re: Reefers in plaster service

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Randy,

Were you award that David F. Myrick's RAILROADS OF NEVADA AND EASTERN CALIFORNIA (v. 2) has a brief history of the Arden Plaster Company with one photo? It is on page 760 (I said it was brief!). There are other references to the company in accounts of other industrial operations around the area, as U.S. Gypsum purchased other properties nearby, and the locomotives moved around. One of their former locomotives is shown on page [836] near Amboy.

Thanks for sharing some very interesting history.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 4/29/17 12:17 AM, randyhees@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

I made an unexpected research find today.   I have been researching Arden Plaster Company, located in the south end of the Las Vegas Valley.  They operated from 1907 to about 1930.  I was drawn to them because they operated a 3’ gauge haul railroad (using at least 5 locomotives over the life of the company)  to bring the gypsum from the mines to the plant.


Today at the Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas, I was looking at what was thought to be Arden Plaster records, but turned out to be LA&SL (Union Pacific) Arden Station records including daily cash reports, records of shipments with car numbers.  The largest customer by far was the plaster factory.  The surprise was that most of the plaster which was mostly shipped to Southern California was shipped in PFE refrigerator cars.  The shipments headed east were in box cars, either LA&SL or eastern owned.  A photograph of the plant shows only refrigerator cars on the loading track.  I can only assume that plaster is considered a clean cargo, and that using them such service between LA and Las Vegas was keeping them close to the shipping points in Southern California, but keeping them in active revenue service.  We noted that in Oct the reefers disappeared and boxcars were used instead.  On at least one occasion a Santa Fe refrigerator showed up in this service.


Other shipments noted were regular shipments in of fuel oil, both for the narrow gauge locomotives, but also for the plaster factory, as well as food and other supplies for the company store. 


The next largest shipper was the Potosi Zinc and Lead Company, owned by the Mahoney Brothers… They shipped a car or two at a time… but received some interesting loads including a steam tractor.  The Mahoney Brothers are believed to be road contractors from San Francisco, who built street railroads and as a result are credited with construction of at least two orders of cable cars and possible one order of electric street cars, which were supplied under construction contracts, but were likely sub-contracted to others.


Randy Hees



Re: BLI 6k tank cars

golden1014
 

Hi Rich, got any of those cars left?  John Golden


Re: Table Saw

qmp211
 

Ed,

I’m always interested in alternative solutions as are the members of this group from the thorough discussions I see posted.

We’d all be real interested in the techniques you've used to successfully mill styrene and resin and whether those techniques will work for model freight cars. Can you share the type of mill, length, diameter, # of flutes, spindle speed, type of fixtures you have used and how you enter/exit the workpiece are some things I’d really appreciate learning about.

Thanks in advance for sharing.

Randy Danniel


Reefers in plaster service

Randy Hees
 

I made an unexpected research find today.   I have been researching Arden Plaster Company, located in the south end of the Las Vegas Valley.  They operated from 1907 to about 1930.  I was drawn to them because they operated a 3’ gauge haul railroad (using at least 5 locomotives over the life of the company)  to bring the gypsum from the mines to the plant.


Today at the Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas, I was looking at what was thought to be Arden Plaster records, but turned out to be LA&SL (Union Pacific) Arden Station records including daily cash reports, records of shipments with car numbers.  The largest customer by far was the plaster factory.  The surprise was that most of the plaster which was mostly shipped to Southern California was shipped in PFE refrigerator cars.  The shipments headed east were in box cars, either LA&SL or eastern owned.  A photograph of the plant shows only refrigerator cars on the loading track.  I can only assume that plaster is considered a clean cargo, and that using them such service between LA and Las Vegas was keeping them close to the shipping points in Southern California, but keeping them in active revenue service.  We noted that in Oct the reefers disappeared and boxcars were used instead.  On at least one occasion a Santa Fe refrigerator showed up in this service.


Other shipments noted were regular shipments in of fuel oil, both for the narrow gauge locomotives, but also for the plaster factory, as well as food and other supplies for the company store. 


The next largest shipper was the Potosi Zinc and Lead Company, owned by the Mahoney Brothers… They shipped a car or two at a time… but received some interesting loads including a steam tractor.  The Mahoney Brothers are believed to be road contractors from San Francisco, who built street railroads and as a result are credited with construction of at least two orders of cable cars and possible one order of electric street cars, which were supplied under construction contracts, but were likely sub-contracted to others.


Randy Hees



BLI 6k tank car

SUVCWORR@...
 

All of the cars are gone except the Niagara Smelting

Thanks

Rich Orr


Re: Work bench/table height?

Eric Bergh
 

My bench top is 30" with a chair height of 19"... but I have a pullout tray at 27"h using a pair of keyboard suspensions that lock open at 14-1/2' extended. The tray is actually an inexpensive cork bulletin board that I use to lay down drawings/templates with wax paper, for glue ups, etc and for light cutting etc. While things are drying, they can slide back underneath the formica countertop. For close work I do have a small 4" raised stand that I set out on top of the countertop. Here is a poor iPhone pic w/ relative dimensions, I hope:  http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q70/ebergh/untitled%20image.jpg

  

BTW, my modules-in-progress are above the bench - bottom is 50"h, Railtop = 57". I am 6'-4", at least in the morning...

-eb


Re: Work bench/table height?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I have two benches. One is the usual 30” height, and is where I work on detail things, decaling, weathering, and it’s also where my computer screens are, with a pull-out slide for the keyboard. I began developing carpal tunnel issues and the pull-out slide ended that pretty quickly. Your forearms should be level from your elbow to the keyboard when typing.



The other bench is 38” high, and has a Panavise mounted on it. This is where I do more heavy work, sawing and carving and filing things. I also have a miniature drill press, and when I’m using that, I set it up on that bench. Dirty work, with dust or filings and so on I do there, because the plastic laminate top abets cleanup considerably.



You warded off issues of lighting, but I’m going to offer this anyway: I have Luxo lamps, the adjustable arm incandescent (changing to LED) lamps. I have three on the low desk, two on the tall desk, all with 100W (or equivalent) lamps in them. I move them all around all the time, to get a LOT of light on whatever I’m working on.



Oh, yeah, I also have another desk, normal 30” height, which is where I do oversize projects, like the 6’ long trolley track loop I built for my model railroad club. But that’s generally covered with “stuff.” Fancy term would be my staging area.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, April 28, 2017 12:17 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Work bench/table height?





Hi,



I'm going to move/rebuild/redefine my workbench. Is there some kind of 'standard'

for how high a workbench surface should be relative to either the height of the chair

you are sitting on or the height of your elbow?

Although this topic is off topic - I do intend to use the new workspace to build

steam era freight cars ... is that good enough for the moderator? (Yes, that's a

real question and I will "take it somewhere else" if the moderator says "not

here, please".



===> Although some of you will be tempted to discuss "related topics" to

my question such as lighting, size, tools, storage methods, etc.

I am not really interested in answers of that type and politely request

that you not reply to this post with those answers (start your own

off topic, please).

- Jim B.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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